PipeChat Digest #4917 - Monday, November 22, 2004
 
Re: What the...
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: What the...
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: What the...hoist by his own petard!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: What the...
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: What the...
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: What the...
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Virgil Fox
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Re: What the...
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: What the...
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: What the...
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: What the...
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: What the...
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Reader's Digest Organ Collection
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: What the...
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
Re: What the...
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: What the...
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: What the...
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: What the...
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 02:27:54 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Writing as a non-American, I can probably just about get away with this.   Virgil Fox was NEVER out of control.   Virgil Fox was totally IN control, and quite happy to virtually re-compose anything which came his way. I get the distinct impression, that in the unlikely event of J S Bach turning up in the audience, Fox would have told him how he SHOULD have played his own works!!   It takes an extraordinary egotism to drive oneself so hard as to achieve technical proficiency beyond the norm, and then draw attention to it in such a flamboyant way.....but that's entertainment gaining the upper arm over artistry.   I am sure this is a very personal view, but when I listen to almost anything played by Virgil Fox, I do not hear true emotion or tenderness. I certainly hear virtuosity in super-abundance, but I also sense a tortured soul who had deep flaws and an almost manic desire to show that, inspite of them, he was the best there ever was. Almost every crescendo or diminuendo seems, to me, to be mere affectation.   Other people have puished the technical limits to dizzy heights......Simon Preston played the Barber "Festive Toccata" at the BBC proms this year, but with a controlled, fluid elegance which set a standard. Germani's "Toccata" is a work written by an absolute virtuoso, whilst Dupre's recordings are often rather sloppy but "Oh! So musical!"   Don't misundertsand me, I LOVE the Fox recordings, but for all the wrong reasons; none of which are really musical. It's the "will he or won't he" mentality; like watching Houdini escape or the high-wire walker crossing Niagra.   Like them, Fox showed what COULD be done, and that is important from a technical point of view.   In music, technique is terribly important, but it must always be the servant to musical artistry, and never the master.   So it begs the question:-   Was Fox a true artist or merely a first class circus act?   Please forward all poison replies, parcel bombs and death-threats to my agent, who is now currently hiding somewhere in a Brazilian rain-forest!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell - somewhere in Europe ;-)             --- Andy Lawrence <andy@ablorgans.com> wrote:   > Ok, ok, I know I'm the only one around here for whom > this is news... I was 5 > when Virgil died. I was just surfing around > virgilfoxlegacy.com and > listening to a few things. Just heard Bach's > Tocatta, Adagio, and Fugue in > C (Riverside). That guy was out of control!     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! - Get yours free! http://my.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 07:08:26 EST   <snip> >Just heard Bach's Tocatta, Adagio, and Fugue in >C (Riverside). That guy was out of control! And the Tocatta from T&F = in d >(also Riverside) just made me laugh... but in a good way. Never thought =   I'd >hear someone use 5 manuals and 10 pistons just in the Tocatta. <snip> ARRRRGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!! In English, it's "toccata." There are some variants in other languages, = such as "tokkata", but they all derive from the Italian feminine past = particple of the word "toccare", which means to touch, and which derives from the = Latin. (note the double c's) Here we are professional musicians, but we can't spell the titles of types of keyboard compositions properly. It's one of = my biggest pet peeves, but please people, if we organists are going to be = taken seriously, we all need to work on little things like these. Call me persnickity, or obsessive/compulsive, (maybe I am!), or bitchy, even, = but things like this drive me batty. A couple of weeks ago, the dean of an AGO chapter = did the same thing...a DEAN! If this is the type of leadership we have, it's = no wonder our organists are in such bad shape. Organists are already the = butt of musicians, it doesn't help when organists can't spell musical terms or = don't properly use musical terms. We've got to be musically literate to try to =   elevate ourselves in musical circles. People thing we are relegated to a = dark corner of a mortuary chapel playing a Hammond spinet (just = remember--there is nothing wrong with playing a Hammond when it's done properly!) because = we've done it to ourselves. If we continue to kill our educational credibility =   because we can't even spell musical terms or use proper musical = terminology, well...those are just more black marks against organists. It starts with = the small things before they start to escalate. Don't forget how many = people read these boards who are lurkers...you never know who might see a post = you have written. A minor spelling typo is one thing, but we need to be conscious = of who might be reading--it could be a future student, a future business client, a future professor, a future recital host. Who knows who lurks = out there... Off my soapbox now. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: What the...hoist by his own petard! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 04:40:12 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Two words spring to mind...."pot" and "kettle".   Try persnickety and participle Monty!!!!!!!   Hee hee!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   PS: Back to practising a Tocatta and Fudge     --- RMB10@aol.com wrote:   > In English, it's "toccata."   > Here we are professional > musicians, but we can't > spell the titles of types of keyboard compositions > properly. It's one of my > biggest pet peeves   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 07:51:39 EST   In a message dated 11/22/2004 7:09:20 AM Eastern Standard Time, = RMB10@aol.com writes:     > People thing we are relegated to a dark > corner of a mortuary chapel playing a Hammond spinet (just = remember--there > is > nothing wrong with playing a Hammond when it's done properly!) because > we've > done it to ourselves.   I guess "People thing" is a minor typo. Or is it indigenous usage in = certain sectors? And I thought "mortuary chapels" all had compact Wicks = instruments in a nearby closet. Haven't even seen a Hamond schpinette (I prefer the = German spelling myself) in a very, very long time.   Back to your corn flakes, kids!   Dudel (that's German spelling too and has nothing to do with the eponymous =   Yankee D.)   Miaow!  
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 07:58:29 -0500   Oh puhlease! Its a friggin chat room! Don't you know that all chat posts =   are legally required to have misspellings, sentences that start with lowercase letters, etc. ;)   When I sent off that post, it was late at night and I actually was looking =   at the word and thinking, "wait... how do you spell that again? But its just a chatroom post, it doesn't matter. I'll just send it."   If it was a recital program, newspaper article, magazine article, book, mailing, or anything that mattered in any way whatsoever, I would have = made sure every word was correct.   > > ARRRRGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!! > In English, it's "toccata." There are some variants in other > languages, such as "tokkata", but they all derive from the Italian > feminine past particple of the word "toccare", which means to touch, > and which derives from the Latin. > (note the double c's) Here we are professional musicians, but we > can't spell the titles of types of keyboard compositions properly. > It's one of my biggest pet peeves, but please people, if we > organists are going to be taken seriously, we all need to work on > little things like these. Call me persnickity, or > obsessive/compulsive, (maybe I am!), or bitchy, even, but things > like this drive me batty. A couple of weeks ago, the dean of an > AGO chapter did the same thing...a DEAN! If this is the type of > leadership we have, it's no wonder our organists are in such bad > shape. Organists are already the butt of musicians, it doesn't > help when organists can't spell musical terms or don't properly use > musical terms. We've got to be musically literate to try to > elevate ourselves in musical circles. People thing we are > relegated to a dark corner of a mortuary chapel playing a Hammond > spinet (just remember--there is nothing wrong with playing a > Hammond when it's done properly!) because we've done it to > ourselves. If we continue to kill our educational credibility > because we can't even spell musical terms or use proper musical > terminology, well...those are just more black marks against > organists. It starts with the small things before they start to > escalate. Don't forget how many people read these boards who are > lurkers...you never know who might see a post you have written. A > minor spelling typo is one thing, but we need to be conscious of > who might be reading--it could be a future student, a future > business client, a future professor, a future recital host. Who > knows who lurks out there... > > Off my soapbox now. > > Monty Bennett     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:02:05 -0500   ROFL!!! Thank you. :)     > RMB10@aol.com writes: > > > People thing we are relegated to a dark > > corner of a mortuary chapel playing a Hammond spinet (just remember-- > I guess "People thing" is a minor typo. Or is it indigenous usage in > certain sectors? And I thought "mortuary chapels" all had compact > Wicks instruments in a nearby closet. Haven't even seen a Hamond > schpinette (I prefer the German spelling myself) in a very, very > long time.     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Virgil Fox From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 07:05:40 -0600   HI, I once attended a concert of Virgil's and heard his "Black Beauty." I believe that is what he called his Rodgers? The lights went down and as they came up again, all that was seen was a light shining on his = rhinestone circled heels of his organ shoes. What a sight that was! lol More = lights and there he was sitting at the console with a black cape lined with red satin it looked like. I wondered if Dracula was playing or what? lol = He turned around and told us to put our seatbelts on because we were in for a wild ride, and what ride that was too! Pedal technique- we all know = that we are not to "slap" the pedals with our feet. Slap? He pounded all over the place, marching as to war sort-of-speak. The reed speakers etc were place behind the console, towards the rear of the stage and on each side. I thought I would go deaf but survived = somehow. It was truly an experience I shall never forget. How many times can we say that about most concerts? Gary    
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:19:56 -0500   This also brings up a good point about the state of the organ world. I would submit that our problem as organists is not that we are not persnickity enough, compulsive enough, high-brow enough, stuffy enough.   It does seem to true, though, that organ performers do not have the same expectation on them as pianists, for example. I've never seen a pianist perform with sheet music, yet organists do it regularly. And I have heard = a few sloppy organ recitals... but not too many really. All the ones that have been sloppy really were being performed by organists who were technically professional (because they had paid church jobs) but really = were more of a glorified amateur (I fall in this category, except I don't even get paid. I just do it cuz I love it, gasp!). But in these cases, the organist never passed him/herself off as anything more than that   Here's a problem I see with your theory: professional pianists seem to be =   respected enough, even though there are awful volunteer or even paid = church pianists out there, who have never even heard of a Toccata. I think we = have to look deeper than misspellings and bad usage to find the reason for our predicament. One thing I see is that we continue to program, play, and speak to each other, alienating even other musicians. Maybe Virgil could teach us a thing or two on this one.   Its probably safe to say, though, that I'll never mispell Toccata again, = and I do thank you for that! Really!   Andy     On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 07:58:29 -0500, Andy Lawrence wrote > Oh puhlease! Its a friggin chat room! Don't you know that all chat > posts are legally required to have misspellings, sentences that > start with lowercase letters, etc. ;) > > When I sent off that post, it was late at night and I actually was > looking at the word and thinking, "wait... how do you spell that > again? But its just a chatroom post, it doesn't matter. I'll just > send it." > > If it was a recital program, newspaper article, magazine article, > book, mailing, or anything that mattered in any way whatsoever, I > would have made sure every word was correct. > > > > > ARRRRGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH!!!!!!! > > In English, it's "toccata." There are some variants in other > > languages, such as "tokkata", but they all derive from the Italian > > feminine past particple of the word "toccare", which means to touch, > > and which derives from the Latin. > > (note the double c's) Here we are professional musicians, but we > > can't spell the titles of types of keyboard compositions properly. > > It's one of my biggest pet peeves, but please people, if we > > organists are going to be taken seriously, we all need to work on > > little things like these. Call me persnickity, or > > obsessive/compulsive, (maybe I am!), or bitchy, even, but things > > like this drive me batty. A couple of weeks ago, the dean of an > > AGO chapter did the same thing...a DEAN! If this is the type of > > leadership we have, it's no wonder our organists are in such bad > > shape. Organists are already the butt of musicians, it doesn't > > help when organists can't spell musical terms or don't properly use > > musical terms. We've got to be musically literate to try to > > elevate ourselves in musical circles. People thing we are > > relegated to a dark corner of a mortuary chapel playing a Hammond > > spinet (just remember--there is nothing wrong with playing a > > Hammond when it's done properly!) because we've done it to > > ourselves. If we continue to kill our educational credibility > > because we can't even spell musical terms or use proper musical > > terminology, well...those are just more black marks against > > organists. It starts with the small things before they start to > > escalate. Don't forget how many people read these boards who are > > lurkers...you never know who might see a post you have written. A > > minor spelling typo is one thing, but we need to be conscious of > > who might be reading--it could be a future student, a future > > business client, a future professor, a future recital host. Who > > knows who lurks out there... > > > > Off my soapbox now. > > > > Monty Bennett > > A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service > PO Box 111 > Burlington, VT 05402 > (802)578-3936 > Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com >     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 05:45:47 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Are you surprised that we operate in a closed society?   Look at the composers who wrote for the organ......the various Bachs, Pachelbel, Handel, Purcell, Kodaly, Dvorak, Glasunov, Mozart, Brahms, Reger, Mendelssohn, Elgar, Messaien etc etc.   Who's missing?   Beethoven (who did write some interesting Trios which have been transcribed for organ), most of the Russian composers, Ravel, Debussy and all those, like Wagner, who wrote opera music by and large.   If "the other side" don't understand organ-music, they can read books and listen to CD's. I'm sure we organists know A GREAT DEAL about THEIR music. God knows! We have transcribed enough of it.   If they can't appreciate our music, it's THEIR problem.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Andy Lawrence <andy@ablorgans.com> wrote:   One thing I see is that we continue to > program, play, and > speak to each other, alienating even other > musicians.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Meet the all-new My Yahoo! - Try it today! http://my.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:50:12 EST     In a message dated 11/22/04 7:20:22 AM, andy@ablorgans.com writes:     > Maybe Virgil could > teach us a thing or two on this one. >   Virgil Fox was no saint either. I remember reading a quote from All The Stops in which Fox compared Biggs' playing to dried owl sh*t. There is = also a recording on the internet of a Fox masterclass where he goes nuts on a kid =   for questioning his decision to use the swell pedal on a trio sonata. = Hmmmmm. As far as the issue of organists playing from memory goes, a few do. However, most do not because it is not practical. When you compare the = weekly duties of a pianist to an organist-you can see that the organist has to = cover a minimum of three solo works, several hymns/liturgical pieces, and choir = anthems (not to mention dealing with other church staff, conducting rehearsals, planning music, ETC). The pianist can channel most of their creative = energy on preparing and memorizing solo literature for long term concert plans. = Also-how many pianists can improvise? Food for thought-   Cheers, gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:56:05 EST     In a message dated 11/22/04 7:46:12 AM, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes:     > Look at the composers who wrote for the organ......the > various Bachs, Pachelbel, Handel, Purcell, Kodaly, > Dvorak, Glasunov, Mozart, Brahms, Reger, Mendelssohn, > Elgar, Messaien etc etc. >   Not only did they write for organ-they made a living playing the organ. = The organ certainly sharpened and influenced their compositions for other instruments too. Wagner studied with an organist-and I find it = interesting that he was responsible for extending the range of orchestral brass instruments downward! gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:58:49 -0500   Now this is more like it! Isn't this so much more fun than discussing how =   you pronounce Maranatha?   Ah... nothing like a little controversy ;)   Andy   hehe  
(back) Subject: Re: Reader's Digest Organ Collection From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:48:20 -0800   >Hi, Dale -- > >Do an eBay search on "Reader's Digest organ" and you should find >several available examples of the various RD sets. They appear >rather regularly...! > >--Tim > >At 12:42 AM 11/21/2004, Dale wrote: >>want to sell it? > > I have some extras of the sets available too. which set do you want?  
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 06:06:35 -0800 (PST)     --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote:   [snip] I remember reading > a quote from All The > Stops   Yes, that book, I must admit, was one I didn't want to put down until I finished it...   In that book mention was made of the fact that Virgil didn't have time to memorize the Poulenc concerto, correct?   At a later concert Virgil, because of his illness which lead to his passing, had to ask Ladd Thomas to play that concerto on his behalf...     Best wishes to all...     Morton Belcher fellow list member....       > Cheers, > gfc > > > > Gregory Ceurvorst > 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS > Evanston, IL 60201 > 847.332.2788 home/fax > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com > gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! - Get yours free! http://my.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:16:35 -0600   Why is it that organists don't have to perform from memory? It forces one to learn his or her music to a much fuller extent.   Anyway, I haven't managed to get to a professional organ recital all semester. Every time I wanted to go something came up and I couldn't get out of town, but my studio colleagues who had gone, would come back complaining about everything.   Friday in my lesson my prof commented that when he went to a professional piano recital it could be anywhere from ho hum to fabulous, but with professional organ recitals, it was anywhere from ho hum to terrible.   Alicia Zeilenga   P.S. Monty, I do not have spell check with this email account, so please pardon any typos. ;-)     -----Original Message----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <<<Snip>>> > It does seem to true, though, that organ performers do not have the > same > expectation on them as pianists, for example. I've never seen a > pianist > perform with sheet music, yet organists do it regularly. And I have > heard a > few sloppy organ recitals... but not too many really. All the ones > that > have been sloppy really were being performed by organists who were > technically professional (because they had paid church jobs) but really > were > more of a glorified amateur (I fall in this category, except I don't > even > get paid. I just do it cuz I love it, gasp!). But in these cases, the > organist never passed him/herself off as anything more than that <<<Snip>>>      
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:25:43 -0600   hee hee   NEVER play hymns from memory, at least that's a resolution I'm trying to make myself keep.   Yesterday I wanted my cantor to sing the third verse of the OCP "O Sacred Head Surrounded" which begins with the words "O Jesus, we adore you upon the cross our king" since it was Christ the King Sunday. Now, as well as I SHOULD know that hymn, I played the introduction for "O Sacrament Most Holy". My cantor tried to inform me of my mistake, but I didn't know what she was saying and made her sing the verse. Luckily, luckily, luckily, the verse form is the same for both hymns and she did a marvelous job adapting to the new melody.   Or how about the time I forgot the melody for "At the Cross" or the Alleluia chant...   Alicia Zeilenga     -----Original Message----- From: Gfc234@aol.com To: pipechat@pipechat.org Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:50:12 EST Subject: Re: What the...   > > In a message dated 11/22/04 7:20:22 AM, andy@ablorgans.com writes: > > > > Maybe Virgil could > > teach us a thing or two on this one. > > > > Virgil Fox was no saint either. I remember reading a quote from All > The > Stops in which Fox compared Biggs' playing to dried owl sh*t. There > is also a > recording on the internet of a Fox masterclass where he goes nuts on a > kid > for questioning his decision to use the swell pedal on a trio sonata. > Hmmmmm. > As far as the issue of organists playing from memory goes, a few do. > However, most do not because it is not practical. When you compare > the weekly > duties of a pianist to an organist-you can see that the organist has to > cover a > minimum of three solo works, several hymns/liturgical pieces, and choir > anthems > (not to mention dealing with other church staff, conducting rehearsals, > planning music, ETC). The pianist can channel most of their creative > energy on > preparing and memorizing solo literature for long term concert plans. > Also-how > many pianists can improvise? Food for thought- > > Cheers, > gfc > > > > Gregory Ceurvorst > 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS > Evanston, IL 60201 > 847.332.2788 home/fax > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com > gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net >      
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:29:17 -0600   I have been to quite a few recitals lately where the organist played everything from memory. Ken Cowan, David Goode and Joyce Jones, to = mention but three.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 8:16 AM Subject: Re: What the...     > Why is it that organists don't have to perform from memory? It forces > one to learn his or her music to a much fuller extent.      
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:37:20 -0600   It is interesting to see what happens when good performers mess up. I remember nearly forty years ago going to a recital given by Marie-Claire Alain in Bristol, where she played "Wachet auf" from memory. In the = middle she got a bit lost and forgot where she was, but nothing daunted = improvised a short cadenza in the style of Bach until she could find a suitable way = to get back into the original piece. It was very impressive!   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 8:25 AM Subject: Re: What the...     > hee hee > > NEVER play hymns from memory, at least that's a resolution I'm trying to > make myself keep.