PipeChat Digest #4918 - Monday, November 22, 2004
 
memorization
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Beethoven, Wanger, Russia, and the organ
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: What the...
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: today's selections (xpost)
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
playing with scores or not?
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Music List: First United Lutheran, Hammond, IN
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: today's selections
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: What the...hoist by his own petard!
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: What the...topic at hand!
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: playing with scores or not?
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
My post...
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Music for voice and organ or v.v.
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: My post...
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Reader's Digest Organ Collection
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: My post...
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Music for voice and organ or v.v.
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: What the...hoist by his own petard!
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Virgil's playing
  by "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@charter.net>
Tactile memory
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Pipechat IRC tonight!
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4917 - 11/22/04
  by <Quentsmith@aol.com>
learning repertory (was: memorization)
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
RE: learning repertory (was: memorization)
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
 

(back) Subject: memorization From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 06:59:48 -0800   First of all, as has already been pointed out, working church organists do just that: WORK (grin). I have OFTEN told younger people, "Learn your repertoire in undergraduate school; you won't have TIME after that."   Second, if I'm not mistaken, Franz Liszt was the first person to perform ANY kind of recital in public from memory, and it was quite a scandal at the time.   So ... why apply a 19th century innovation to a discipline whose music is MOSTLY from BEFORE the 19th century? Isn't that mixing performance practices?   Yes, the French play without scores, but I have MORE than a suspicion (borne out by things like the story of how Dupre's Stations of the Cross came to be written) that the VAST majority of French organ music of ALL centuries started life as improvisations; to this day one seldom hears composed pieces played at Mass in Parisian churches.   Unlike many of my colleagues, I see no value in memorization of organ literature. And yes, I have done it, and played successful recitals in public from memory. I don't LIKE it; it adds an extra-musical layer of tension that shouldn't be there. When I played my last required degree recital, I announced to all and sundry in the green room afterwards, "That's the LAST time I'm EVER doing THAT!"   And went on to have a long, happy life and a reasonably successful career as a church musician without memorizing a single additional measure of music, aside from the Chant, which, after fifty years, I could probably sing in my SLEEP (grin).   Few of us actually READ the score of a big Bach or Messiaen piece in performance, but it's there as a reference point if we need it.   Memorization isn't required of other players ... some orchestral soloists do, some don't; certainly the members of an orchestra don't. Vocal soloists in an oratorio don't; solo vocal recitals are on the decline (at least in these parts) ... but yes, they DO memorize; they have TEXT to help them, and only ONE line to be concerned with, not two hands, two feet, and registration, swell box(es), etc.   Cheers,   Bud   Alicia Zeilenga wrote:   > Why is it that organists don't have to perform from memory? It forces > one to learn his or her music to a much fuller extent. > > Anyway, I haven't managed to get to a professional organ recital all > semester. Every time I wanted to go something came up and I couldn't > get out of town, but my studio colleagues who had gone, would come back > complaining about everything. > > Friday in my lesson my prof commented that when he went to a > professional piano recital it could be anywhere from ho hum to fabulous, =   > but with professional organ recitals, it was anywhere from ho hum to > terrible. > > Alicia Zeilenga > > P.S. Monty, I do not have spell check with this email account, so > please pardon any typos. ;-) > > > -----Original Message----- > From: "Andy Lawrence" > <<<Snip>>> > >>It does seem to true, though, that organ performers do not have the >>same >>expectation on them as pianists, for example. I've never seen a >>pianist >>perform with sheet music, yet organists do it regularly. And I have >>heard a >>few sloppy organ recitals... but not too many really. All the ones >>that >>have been sloppy really were being performed by organists who were >>technically professional (because they had paid church jobs) but really >>were >>more of a glorified amateur (I fall in this category, except I don't >>even >>get paid. I just do it cuz I love it, gasp!). But in these cases, the >>organist never passed him/herself off as anything more than that > > <<<Snip>>> > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Beethoven, Wanger, Russia, and the organ From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 09:59:04 EST     In a message dated 11/22/04 8:46:15 AM, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk (Colin Mitchell) writes:   <<Are you surprised that we operate in a closed society? Look at the composers who wrote for the organ......the various Bachs, Pachelbel, = Handel, Purcell, Kodaly, Dvorak, Glasunov, Mozart, Brahms, Reger, Mendelssohn, Elgar, = Messaien etc etc. Who's missing? Beethoven, most of the Russian composers, Ravel, Debussy and all those, like Wagner, who wrote opera music by and large. Regards, Colin Mitchell UK>>   I have absolutely no idea what all of that means. Can you provide to the list a coherent explanation, and preferable any conclusion you might have intended to draw from these remarks?   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..    
(back) Subject: Re: What the... From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 10:01:01 -0500   John makes me recall another occasion when Marie-Clarie Alain got momentarily lost in the middle of a Bach fugue. Much in the manner John recalls, she improvised in the style of the piece, got herself back on again, and only organists who knew the piece were any the wiser.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   John L. Speller wrote:   >It is interesting to see what happens when good performers mess up. I >remember nearly forty years ago going to a recital given by Marie-Claire >Alain in Bristol, where she played "Wachet auf" from memory. In the = middle >she got a bit lost and forgot where she was, but nothing daunted = improvised >a short cadenza in the style of Bach until she could find a suitable way = to >get back into the original piece. It was very impressive! > >John Speller >      
(back) Subject: Re: today's selections (xpost) From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 10:11:41 -0500   On 11/21/04 9:42 PM, "Innkawgneeto@cs.com" <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> wrote:   > The congregation, however, was absolutely amazed at our Youth Choir. = They > said they hadn't heard them sound THAT good in years!! > Quoting only that sample, sounds altogether like a great Sunday morning = for you! Kudos!   Alan  
(back) Subject: playing with scores or not? From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 10:16:34 EST   Alicia and Andy both bring up good points about organists vs. pianists perorming with music. I know of some music schools that require their organ students to perform =   from memory, but most don't require it for some reason. I was taught to = have the music memorized, but to have the music on the rack marked with piston =   changes, stop changes, etc. That is the one thing that does make us = different from pianists, and in a long program I understand how we organists = benefit from the aid of scores. (I personally like having the score as a crutch.) = When pianists perform with orchestras, page turners would just be in the way = of the audience or in the line of sight with the concertmaster. Also, when performers are not tied to playing from a score, they are freer to make = music--it's more than just notes--they can become the music. Early on, I had an organ instructor who had me memorize works. This tied = in with my piano instruction, so I was used to memorizing. These days, I = will admit, I don't memorize organ works as much as I used to (or I should!), = but I will often play a prelude or postlude at church from memory. When I = do, the people seated in the front of the church or the choir members seated = near the organ console just go crazy because I've played something from = memory. I find it sort of funny. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Music List: First United Lutheran, Hammond, IN From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 09:21:22 -0600   Christ the King November 21, 2004 The Rev. Dr. Bassam J. Abdallah, Pastor and Presiding Minister Beau Surratt, Director of Music and Organist   Liturgy- LBW setting 1   Prelude- "Soon and Very Soon" arr. Jack Schrader (piano)   Processional Hymn- "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name" CORONATION Intro by Wayne Wold; Harmonization by Hal Hopson   Psalm 46 (LBW Tone 5)   Hymn of the Day- "Lord, Enthroned in Heavenly Splendor" BRYN CALFARIA (can't remember who's intro and harm I did- it was from the new "Sonus Novus" series published by Concordia)   Offertory- "Revelation 19" Lavalley/Schrader GREAT Gospel number- often sung by the Gospel choir of the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago   Distribution Music- "Beautiful Savior" ST ELIZABETH "Jesus, Remember Me" (Taize) Improvisation on KING'S WESTON (At the Name of Jesus)   Recessional Hymn- "Soon and Very Soon"   with CLAPPING on the last stanza and several repeats- YES! A BUNCH OF WHITE LUTHERANS WERE CLAPPING ALONG WITH A GOSPEL SONG IN WORSHIP!!!! :)   Postlude- "Trumpet Finale on CORONATION" Wayne Wold     Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324      
(back) Subject: Re: today's selections From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 10:22:56 -0500   On 11/21/04 11:10 PM, "RMB10@aol.com" <RMB10@aol.com> wrote:   > I know Alan meant this to be funny, but in all seriousness, why should th= e > 1,100+ who attend the 7:30AM service not get to hear the guest musicians = that > the other services do?   You are quite right, of course, Monty! The attendance figures you quote ar= e fanTAStic! =20   Surely it beats the common (high?) Anglican practice of two very musical services at 9:30 and 11, preceded by a totally SPOKEN service at 8 or so. (Well, unless you have people who prefer the earliest service because they genuinely don=B9t LIKE music!=8Bbut that=B9s not our kind of folks, anyway.)   Press on!   Alan  
(back) Subject: RE: What the...hoist by his own petard! From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 04:39:43 +1300   >PS: Back to practising a Tocatta and Fudge     Dear me, deario, Colin, you don't play a Tocatta and Fudge. You should = know by now that the piece (always in d minor?) is called Tomato and Fudge. As punishment, you will stand in the corner imagining the flavour of those together.   Harumph, Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: What the...topic at hand! From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 07:37:02 -0800 (PST)     As I attempt to put us back on the track with the initial question...   Im suprised that Andy Lawrence had not heard Virgil until his appearantly = recent listening.   Virgilizing is not a bad thing. I think that's what made Virgil his money, = no? I have heard some organists in rectnt years play pieces as the Bach = 565 on large organs (4 and 5 manuals, as well as larger 3 manual) and use = many changes. I think we are able to do such while remaining musical.   And Monty does have a good point. Some people out there are persnickity, = and obsessive/compulsive (he acknowledges himself as having these traits). = There are some organists that question another's credibility simply = because they engage in a little musical word play. If it's not a true = musical term, they would ask from where such a word originated. I recall = once having a conversation with a friend. That friend told me that a = friend of his who had been associate organist at a larger church in = Florida asked why I used a particular phrase, and continued to say that he = did not know there was such. I meant, not, to create any discomfort by = using such a term, but this did mark a flag with this person.   So, back to the topic at hand...Andy's recent discovery of Virgils = playing.   FWIW   TDH         From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Meet the all-new My Yahoo! =96 Try it today!
(back) Subject: Re: playing with scores or not? From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:04:40 -0800 (PST)   To start, there are a few schools that require a lot of memory work from = its organ students. As a matter of fact, a friend and I were shring a = conversation after Church Music Summit on someone from a particular school = that needed music once. I mentioned that the person at the center of the = conversation should be able to perform several things from memory, simply = because of where they matriculated. One of my previous teachers required memorization of at least one piece a = semester. While I don't play a lot from memory, there are times, where I, = like Monty, do offer voluntaries at church from memory. It's also nice to = maybe open and close a concert from memory. I always have music as a = crutch, however. I may turn the score to the page where I feel there will = be "brain flatulence" ( IE the middle section of Widor's Toccata) just to = keep on point. There are sometimes where I sit at an organ, think about a = piece for a moment, pull stops, and play thru a piece from memory without = a fumble. Then there are times where there score would be helpful. There can also be a "way" to play from memory. Mark Miller who is a = wonderful organist in NYC, plays from memory. He often can be seen with = his eyes closed until he gets to a stop change.   FWIW TDH     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: My post... From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 08:42:41 -0800 (PST)   Was only to continue to talk about Andy Lawrence and his recentlly hearing = Virgil play. I think he is inviting conversation on this. As far as mentioning Monty's correction for the spelling of toccata, it is = only to say that simple things such as the mispelling of words such as = "toccata" and using terms that are not in a Music Dictionary make some = question credibility. That's all.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! =96 Get yours free!
(back) Subject: Re: Music for voice and organ or v.v. From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 11:48:14 EST   Five Psalm Settings for Mezzo Soprano and Organ Wilbur Held Publisher: White Harvest Music, Independence, MO   available through Wingert-Jones / J. W. Pepper - Kansas City, MO satisfaction@jwpepper.com   Dale Rider Independence, MO USA  
(back) Subject: Re: My post... From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 12:07:09 EST   Andy recently heard Virgil play????   Mystical!  
(back) Subject: Re: Reader's Digest Organ Collection From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 12:07:45 EST   "GOLDEN FAVORITES, disks 3 & 4 only"   Dale Rider Independence, MO USA  
(back) Subject: Re: My post... From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 09:12:56 -0800   I find my ability to spell correctly is leaving me ... after two strokes, and with advancing age (chuckle). I was rather harshly taken to task about this recently.   "Clicquot" is not in my spell-checker (grin).   A general comment: when one commonly sees misspellings on billboards and other places where the writers should know better, it's obvious that SOMETHING'S amiss.   I worked for a number of years for a regional newspaper where the editor was about ten years younger that Yr. Humble Servant <g> ... he was a brilliant writer, but his spelling was atrocious, and it fell to me to proofread his pieces. In conversation, we discovered that he'd been at school immediately after the teaching of phonics had been swept away by more "progressive" theories of spelling and reading; I'd received a thorough grounding in phonics.   Therein lies the difference, I think.   The Internet has spawned its own spelling and lexicon ... I'm not sure whether that's progress or not, even though "kewl" has crept into my own writing (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud   T.Desiree' Hines wrote: > Was only to continue to talk about Andy Lawrence and his recentlly > hearing Virgil play. I think he is inviting conversation on this. > > As far as mentioning Monty's correction for the spelling of toccata, it > is only to say that simple things such as the mispelling of words such > as "toccata" and using terms that are not in a Music Dictionary make > some question credibility. > > That's all. > > > From Desiree' > T. Desiree' Hines > Chicago, IL 60610 > ---------------------------- > For Compositions by Desiree' > Frog Music Press > www.frogmusic.com > ------------------------------- > FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' > http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > Do you Yahoo!? > The all-new My Yahoo! <http://my.yahoo.com> =96 Get yours free!      
(back) Subject: Re: Music for voice and organ or v.v. From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 09:21:58 -0800   Check Pepper Music's online catalog ... they have everything from the dreckdiculous to the sublime (grin) ... I found a copy of Eric Thiman's church solos there, and any number of other volumes of unfamiliar solos for voice and idiomatic organ accompaniment.   "Everything for the Church Soloist" has a fair amount of garbage in it, but there's also some good stuff.   Wasn't there a volume of "Everybody's Favorite Church Solos?" Probably out of print, but probably still in libraries.   Concordia also has a number of volumes, notably one of extracts from Bach cantatas for high voice with the accompaniments arranged for organ.   If you can make friends with a Christian Science organist and gain access to their file of solos, there's TONS of out of print stuff by Walford Davies, MacDermid (sp? I know it's not the usual spelling), etc. The texts are mostly scriptural, with a few Mary Baker Eddy poems thrown = in.   Cheers,   Bud   ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote:   > Five Psalm Settings for Mezzo Soprano and Organ > Wilbur Held > Publisher: White Harvest Music, Independence, MO > > available through Wingert-Jones / J. W. Pepper - Kansas City, MO > satisfaction@jwpepper.com <mailto:satisfaction@jwpepper.com> > > Dale Rider > Independence, MO > USA      
(back) Subject: RE: What the...hoist by his own petard! From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 01:24:29 +0800   On a well-tempered instrument you should be able to play it in any key or m= ode. (from memory)   ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: RE: What the...hoist by his own petard! Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 04:39:43 +1300   >=20 > >PS: Back to practising a Tocatta and Fudge >=20 >=20 > Dear me, deario, Colin, you don't play a Tocatta and Fudge. You should kn= ow > by now that the piece (always in d minor?) is called Tomato and Fudge. As > punishment, you will stand in the corner imagining the flavour of those > together.=20 >=20 > Harumph, > Ross -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Virgil's playing From: "Brent Johnson" <brentmj@charter.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 13:03:25 -0500   For those that aren't as familiar with the recordings of Virgil Fox = and his style of playing, there are currently 64 tracks recorded by him = playing on ORGANLive. These tracks are taken from the following albums:   Virgil Fox Encores Virgil Fox plays the John Wannamaker Organ Virgil Fox plays at Lincoln Center Organ Music From France   and From the Heavy organ series featuring an early 70s Rodgers organ:   Bach Live at Winterland Heavy Organ at Carnegie Hall   His comments to the audience (and their responses) have mostly been left = in on the Heavy Organ albums so you get to hear him explaining the music a = bit, too.   Like him or not, I think it's good to hear these recordings, especially = the differences from one album to another, if nothing else, to fuel the = discussion here on Pipechat. Anyone can listen, and it's all free. Just = go to ORGANLive.com to being listening. To find the Fox recordings, click = on "Live Requests" over on the right side, and type "Virgil" in the search = window. Make your requests, and then sit back and listen.   You'll also find all the tracks from the Memorial Concert, which is a = constant favorite at ORGANLive.   Brent Johnson ORGANLive - Music of the organ on demand http://www.organlive.com      
(back) Subject: Tactile memory From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 13:46:35 -0500   On 11/22/04 12:12 PM, "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > The Internet has spawned its own spelling and lexicon ...   Yes. With advancing age I find that there are more and more words that I cannot "spell" orally (though I=B9ve always won the spelling bees in school), but that my fingers can spell just fine; by happenstance, as I was reading Monty=B9s first post on the subject, a friend was sitting here composing a letter to be faxed, and asked how to spell =B3liaison.=B2 I had to admit that = I didn=B9t know how, but that if I typed it (even on a manual typewriter) I could LOOK at it and find out (whether by spellcheck by or what I call =B3tactile memory=B2). Words like =B3a cappella=B2 and =B3Khrushchev=B2 are other examples; I don=B9t know how to spell them, but my fingers do. Grey matter fades faster than finger muscles, I guess.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Pipechat IRC tonight! From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 14:59:43 -0500   We shall be gathering in the Pipechat IRC room again this evening. all = Pipe Chatters are invited to join in the sometimes lively banter that goes on Monday and Friday evenings beginning at 9.00 pm Eastern Time.   For assistance on how to join us go to the Pipechat Web page for detailed = help.   www.pipechat.org   I hope that we will see you there,   Bob Conway     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4917 - 11/22/04 From: <Quentsmith@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 14:59:52 EST   My wife and I attended a Virgil Fox concert many years back = courtesy of Ted Alan Worth. Karen had, at that time, many years studying with = Richard Purvis and had desires to play concerts, ala Virgil.   We met Virgil back stage with Ted that evening after a thrilling concert on the Rodgers Black Beauty. One piece encorporated smoke = enveloping the artist while coming to an end. He was just as flamboyant in real life.   Karen told Virgil that she wanted to follow in his footsteps and = play concerts around the country. She even had a Rodgers three manual at home = to practice on.   Virgil listened closely as she explained her thoughts and I offered =   that we had already come up with a "stage name" for her. He was further intrigued.   "Virgin Fox"...I offered. He and Ted just roared. Virgil came back "With a name like that...you cannot miss!!!"   Never will forget our times with Virgil and Ted over the years.   Quentin Smith Storey & Clyde, Inc. Classic Organs  
(back) Subject: learning repertory (was: memorization) From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 15:09:41 -0600   I continue STRONGLY to disagree with this foolish notion. One finds time = to do that which one truly wants to do, and one should never stop learning = new literature.   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Liquescent <quilisma@cox.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 8:59 AM Subject: memorization     > First of all, as has already been pointed out, working church organists > do just that: WORK (grin). I have OFTEN told younger people, "Learn your > repertoire in undergraduate school; you won't have TIME after that."    
(back) Subject: RE: learning repertory (was: memorization) From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 15:18:07 -0600   I find that I have to agree with both of these statements. Certainly studying the organ while in school affords one the opportunity learn a lot of literature. Those of us who have church jobs and/or other positions may not always have that kind of "free" time in which to always be extensively adding to our repertoires. But neither is the notion that we're stuck with what we've got (however good that might be) true, either! I'm always learning something new, and reconsidering interpretation on things I've already "learned." However, it's true for me that since being in school, I neither learn new music as quickly, or as much at one time. =20   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri     Robert Lind wrote: >I continue STRONGLY to disagree with this foolish notion. One finds time to >do that which one truly wants to do, and one should never stop learning new >literature.   Bud wrote: > First of all, as has already been pointed out, working church organists > do just that: WORK (grin). I have OFTEN told younger people, "Learn your > repertoire in undergraduate school; you won't have TIME after that."