PipeChat Digest #4919 - Monday, November 22, 2004
 
Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been designated as a
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re: learning repertory
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has beendesignated a
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
RE: learning repertory
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been	designated 
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been  designated
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Memorization
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
RE: Christmas Eve Musical Plans
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Memorization
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Regina pacis
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Regina pacis
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Regina pacis
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Regina pacis
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Regina pacis
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Regina pacis
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Regina pacis
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Da Pacem
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been designated as an Historical Building? From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 16:19:35 -0500   Hello! There is a building in my area which has been designated as = an "historical Building" or whatever the official term is. And I suppose = that there are even different degrees of this designation. There is an out of repair pipe organ in the building. Of course the current owners don't = know anything about pipe organs. They would like the organ removed so that = they can renovate the building. They realize that the building has to be restored to it's original condition but does this include the pipe organ?   Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been designated = as an Historical Building?   Thanks.       Jerry       Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Bat Arhonious Software ! Edirol R-1: high quality portable stereo Compact Flash audio recorder = with USB, $400.00, www.chirpingbat.com/edirol.shtml ! Native Instruments Elektrik Piano: $199.00 ! Try Edirol for professional audio capture, audio playback and low = latency MIDI applications: http://www.chirpingbat.com/edirol.shtml ! BA Software is a full fledged Tascam / Teac dealer: http://www.ChirpingBat.Com/tascam.shtml ! Delta 66: $190 includes delivery in the USA, $220 outside, www.ChirpingBat.Com/delta.shtml ! Sound Forge 7.0 with Noise Reduction 2.0 and CD Architect 5.0: $299, includes delivery in the USA, www.ChirpingBat.Com/soundforge.shtml ! Giga Studio 96: $300 includes delivery in the USA, $330 outside, www.ChirpingBat.Com/gigastudio.shtml ! Sonar: 4.0: Studio $299, Producer $599, includes delivery in the USA, = add $30 outside, www.ChirpingBat.Com/sonar.shtml ! We take PayPal, Visa, Mastercard, checks, wire transfers, etc. We ship Internationally. Click to convert our prices into your currency = at: www.xe.com/ucc/full.shtml   Reach BA Software in the United States at: Phone: 1-518-572-6092 weekdays, 1-518-359-8538 other, Email: Bat@ChirpingBat.Com, WWW: www.ChirpingBat.Com    
(back) Subject: Re: learning repertory From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 13:26:34 -0800   I should have made that statement more clear: one only has time to learn the MAJORITY of one's repertoire while in college or conservatory; after that, unless one has the luxury of a full-time organist/only position, it's very difficult to find the time to learn new LARGE pieces.   Most of my positions (all except one, in fact) were 90% choirmaster and 10% organist; the skills REQUIRED were choir-training, service-playing, and improvisation; whatever literature I chose to play for voluntaries was fine with my congregations ... the largest (average attendance 1000 people on a Sunday) could still empty out of the church in five minutes MAX, so I had no practical USE for long pieces. And, as I've said, I'm not a recitalist; never was, never wanted to be. And again, ALL of my positions have had multiple Masses and tight schedules.   Cheers,   Bud (Just A Simple Village Organist)   Robert Lind wrote:   > I continue STRONGLY to disagree with this foolish notion. One finds time = to > do that which one truly wants to do, and one should never stop learning = new > literature. > > Robert Lind > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Liquescent <quilisma@cox.net> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 8:59 AM > Subject: memorization > > > >>First of all, as has already been pointed out, working church organists >>do just that: WORK (grin). I have OFTEN told younger people, "Learn your >>repertoire in undergraduate school; you won't have TIME after that." > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: RE: Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has beendesignated as an Historical Building? From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 15:37:27 -0600     Jerry wrote: >Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been designate= d as an Historical Building?   I'm an architect with an interest in historical buildings (esp. old churc= hes with organs in them!) It comes as a surprise to most people that eve= n though a building is placed on the National Register of Historic Places= , it can still be modified, and even torn down. More stringent qualifica= tions might be placed on a building, were it to be deemed in a historic d= istrict, tho' even that might only affect the exterior appearance. =20   If indeed the building under question actually is designated so that it c= an't be torn down or modified, (inside or out), it is dubious that any su= ch designation would apply to the organ, save maybe the fa=E7ade, in a si= tuation where the interior was deemed of value (Consider the organ in Fra= nk Lloyd Wright's Unitarian Church in Oak Park Illinois--speakers for a d= igital organ reside behind the original wooden fa=E7ade.) Unfortunate, p= erhaps!   Here's what being listed on the register does do for a building (http://w= ww.cr.nps.gov/nr/results.htm):   "Listing in the National Register honors a historic place by recognizing = its importance to its community, State or the Nation. Under Federal law, = owners of private property listed in the National Register are free to ma= intain, manage, or dispose of their property as they choose provided that= there is no Federal involvement. Owners have no obligation to open their= properties to the public, to restore them or even to maintain them, if t= hey choose not to do so."   States and communities may have localized restrictions on what can be don= e to buildings that are placed on the Register.   "In addition to honorific recognition, listing in the National Register r= esults in the following for historic properties:=20   1. Consideration in planning for Federal, federally licensed, and federal= ly assisted projects;   2. Eligibility for certain tax provisions;   3. Consideration of historic values in the decision to issue a surface mi= ning permit where coal is located in accordance with the Surface Mining C= ontrol Act of 1977; and   4. Qualification for Federal grants for historic preservation, when funds= are available."   All of which doesn't do much to help the old organ out, I'm afraid. Chec= k on local regulations, and find out if indeed the building is on the Nat= ional Register of Historic Buildings.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: RE: learning repertory From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 15:38:45 -0600   >I should have made that statement more clear: one only has time to learn=20 the MAJORITY of one's repertoire while in college or conservatory; after   that, unless one has the luxury of a full-time organist/only position,=20 it's very difficult to find the time to learn new LARGE pieces.     Bud,=20   I suspected that's what you meant!   Daniel  
(back) Subject: Re: Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been designated as an Historical Building? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 17:40:43 -0500   On 11/22/04 4:19 PM, "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> wrote:   > Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been designated as a= n > Historical Building?   Find out who =B3designated=B2 the building an Historical Landmark. Federal? State? Municipal? Local historical society? American Institute of Architects? Some are landmarked exterior only; others far more comprehensively. Varies from case to case. It=B9s just a matter of homework to find out. Go for it; not unlikely there=B9s an organ in there to be had for the taking. =20   Alan          
(back) Subject: Re: Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been designated as an Historical Building? From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 15:54:07 -0600   To answer that question you would need to know how the historical building =   designation is written. Many buildings have a designation which applies only to the exterior structure and the owner can pretty much do what they wish inside. In the case of a theatre 'which has been designated a historical building, the functionality of the =   building and interior appointments must be restored however equipment such as heating and lighting can be updated with modern applications. In the case of a pipe organ it can be =   a confusing issue. Some authorities consider the organ to be part of the building and it must =   remain with the building. If the owners want to have the organ removed they will have to check with designating authority to determine the status of the organ under the historical designation. In the =   case of the Chicago Theatre, both the theatre building and the organ have separate historic designations which makes definite the status of the organ within the building. As you may suspect, the status of your particular organ could go either way. I once had the U.S. Navy pay for shipping of my pipe organ as it was considered a musical instrument and thus part of my household goods. It pretty much depends on the situation and who is doing the defining. Btw..since it didn't exceed my authorized weight allowance it worked out pretty well.   Jon     At 03:19 PM 11/22/2004, you wrote: > Hello! There is a building in my area which has been designated as = an >"historical Building" or whatever the official term is. And I suppose = that >there are even different degrees of this designation. There is an out of >repair pipe organ in the building. Of course the current owners don't = know >anything about pipe organs. They would like the organ removed so that = they >can renovate the building. They realize that the building has to be >restored to it's original condition but does this include the pipe organ? > > Can a pipe organ be removed from a building that has been = designated as >an Historical Building? > > Thanks. > > > > Jerry > >      
(back) Subject: Memorization From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 16:59:02 -0800 (PST)   Dear List, My undergraduate teacher, Mildred Andrews, who was a pupil of Marcel = Dupre, required all music to be memorized. We weren't even allowed to = play in organ class from music. I can say that it certainly did keep one = honest, since there was no hiding behind the score. The only place I know = where that same tradition is upheld today is Curtis, or at least it was = until John Weaver retired a couple of years ago. I don't know whether or = not Alan Morrison requires it to the same extent. Ken Cowan and Paul = Jacobs are both products of that Curtis tradition; that's why they play = from memory in public today. Eastman also has memorization requirements, = though I don't think that they are quite as strict as at Curtis. On the = few occasions when I have attended the organ class at Eastman, the playing = was from memory. I also insist that my students memorize at least one piece per semester. = I believe that it is a very important discipline, and it increases powers = of concentration. That being said, there are some people who simply go to = pieces when they have to play from memory. I still believe that those = people should have to memorize as a discipline, but if they still can't do = it confidently after working very hard at it, they ought to be allowed to = play from the score. Organ class is a good place to practice playing from = memory; there is a little stress, but if the atmosphere is congenial and = not intimidating, the students aren't so afraid to try their hand at it. = If they get through unscathed, it's a great confidence builder; if they = fall apart and have a bad memory slip, then they learn to recover. I = emphatically believe that if the teacher is encouraging and takes memory = slips in organ class in good humor, that attitude really helps the = students' confidence. Playing in organ class is a great preparation for performing in public in recital. I believe that it = is an indispensable part of the students' education. My former student, Fred Teardo, whom some of you may have heard at the = OHS convention and at other times, prefers to play from memory. I = incorporated memorization into the learning process for Fred from his very = first lessons, and as a result his memory is rock solid. He also tells me = that he has a photographic element to his memory, which most people aren't = fortunate enough to have. I honestly believe that to play from memory = with real confidence, students have to begin to memorize early in their = studies. Students who are older than 20 or so who try to memorize for = the first time do so only with great difficulty in my experience. I still = think that memorization is a useful exercise even for students of that age = who don't plan to play from memory in public. The other thing that I tell = my students is if you want to continue to play from memory, don't ever = stop. I did, and now I just can't bring myself to play from memory in = public anymore. I honestly believe that one learns differently and much more thoroughly if one intends to play from memory. = One must learn to make use of all forms of memory-- motor, aural, visual, = and cognitive -- to be able to play from memory with confidence. It's a = separate skill unto itself. The French have always placed a great = emphasis on playing from memory, but I don't know of any German or = Austrian organist who plays from memory in concert. Perhaps others in this = forum do, but I can't think of any at the moment. Like anything else, = memorization can be a very useful exercise, if not carried to ridiculous = extremes. I'm still a believer in it. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT USA  
(back) Subject: RE: Christmas Eve Musical Plans From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 18:52:39 -0600   More later about B'ham, but I bought a recording made by David Briggs at Gloucester Cathedral in 2000. On it he has recorded a piece called "Berceuse-Paraphrase" by George Baker, about 8 1/2 minutes. The tune upon which this piece is based is the most familiar version of "Away in the Manger".   This would work very well for Eucharist at a large liturgical church where hymns aren't sung during communion - very soft and Frenchified without being too 'out there'. I know nothing about the publisher info - if someone has this, please inform me.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com        
(back) Subject: RE: Memorization From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 18:59:40 -0600   I would agree with requiring memorization, but I burned my memory out in law school. So if I had to play entirely from memory now, I just couldn't play.   Moral: dunno. I can afford organ lessons and trips to hear organs and organists, and don't have to worry about buying groceries on a musician's salary. As the Rolling Stones sang, "You can't always get what you want."   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Regina pacis From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 20:22:07 -0500   I'm thinking of playing Langlais' "Poem of Peace" (not to be confused with his "Song of Peace" [Chant de paix], which I'll probably play also) this coming Sunday. The anthem will be Stainer's "How Beautiful upon the Mountains," continuing the peace theme of the Old Testament reading, = though from a different chapter in Isaiah.   I am writing to ask if someone can supply the text to "Regina pacis..." a chant (I guess) on which Langlais' "Poem of Peace" is based and which he explicitly quotes, including those two words. I thought it would be a = piece of cake to google it, but nothing came up except churches and schools = called Regina Pacis. I know it means "Queen of Peace," but for a note in the bulletin I'd like to elaborate a bit on the text of the music Langlais is quoting.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Regina pacis From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 17:58:09 -0800   "Queen of Peace" is one of Mary's titles in the Litany of Loretto ... the melody for THAT is on p. 1857 of the "typical" edition of the Liber Usualis.   It's not listed as an Antiphon in either the Liber or the Antiphonale Monasticum; that means unless it's an Antiphon or a Responsory at Mattins (which is in a separate book that I don't have), it's probably the Litany he's referring to. What's the rest of the text? All the Litany says is "Regina pacis, ora pro nobis."   Cheers,   Bud   Randolph Runyon wrote:   > I'm thinking of playing Langlais' "Poem of Peace" (not to be confused = with > his "Song of Peace" [Chant de paix], which I'll probably play also) this > coming Sunday. The anthem will be Stainer's "How Beautiful upon the > Mountains," continuing the peace theme of the Old Testament reading, = though > from a different chapter in Isaiah. > > I am writing to ask if someone can supply the text to "Regina pacis..." = a > chant (I guess) on which Langlais' "Poem of Peace" is based and which he > explicitly quotes, including those two words. I thought it would be a = piece > of cake to google it, but nothing came up except churches and schools = called > Regina Pacis. I know it means "Queen of Peace," but for a note in the > bulletin I'd like to elaborate a bit on the text of the music Langlais = is > quoting. > > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Regina pacis From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 20:59:40 -0500   Thanks, Bud. The other fragments of text in the music are: "Pax Domini" and "Da pacem Domine." What little Latin I know is enough to translate those lines! Langlais doesn't quote the words "ora pro nobis." In all three instances, the words appear below the first few notes of the chant = (I term I bandy about loosely, I know), which then continues for a while without them.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu         on 11/22/04 8:58 PM, Liquescent at quilisma@cox.net wrote:   > "Queen of Peace" is one of Mary's titles in the Litany of Loretto ... > the melody for THAT is on p. 1857 of the "typical" edition of the Liber > Usualis. > > It's not listed as an Antiphon in either the Liber or the Antiphonale > Monasticum; that means unless it's an Antiphon or a Responsory at > Mattins (which is in a separate book that I don't have), it's probably > the Litany he's referring to. What's the rest of the text? All the > Litany says is "Regina pacis, ora pro nobis." > > Cheers, > > Bud >    
(back) Subject: Re: Regina pacis From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:16:43 -0500   Sorry for the typo. I meant to say "a term I bandy about loosely..."     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Regina pacis From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 18:26:00 -0800   "Da pacem, Domine" is a VERY familiar text, but I can't find the music ANYWHERE. Strange ... it was probably in "Cantus ad Processiones" which I no longer own ... I KNOW we sang it.   Cheers,   Bud   Randolph Runyon wrote:   > Thanks, Bud. The other fragments of text in the music are: "Pax = Domini" > and "Da pacem Domine." What little Latin I know is enough to translate > those lines! Langlais doesn't quote the words "ora pro nobis." In all > three instances, the words appear below the first few notes of the chant = (I > term I bandy about loosely, I know), which then continues for a while > without them. > > > Randy Runyon > Music Director > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.edu > > > > > on 11/22/04 8:58 PM, Liquescent at quilisma@cox.net wrote: > > >>"Queen of Peace" is one of Mary's titles in the Litany of Loretto ... >>the melody for THAT is on p. 1857 of the "typical" edition of the Liber >>Usualis. >> >>It's not listed as an Antiphon in either the Liber or the Antiphonale >>Monasticum; that means unless it's an Antiphon or a Responsory at >>Mattins (which is in a separate book that I don't have), it's probably >>the Litany he's referring to. What's the rest of the text? All the >>Litany says is "Regina pacis, ora pro nobis." >> >>Cheers, >> >>Bud >> > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Regina pacis From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:26:22 -0500   I found the Litany of Loretto at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/augustine/arch/bvm/loretto.html and thou it does have "Regina pacis" in it, it does not have "Pax Domini" = or "Da pacem Domine" in it. So I'm thinking maybe it's not from the Loretto Litany after all.   A google search with all the words in the music turned up nothing that had them all.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: Re: Regina pacis From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:39:16 -0500   I think now that Langlais may be quoting from three different sources. After all, as you indicate, "Da pacem, Domine" is a separate anthem (or chant?). I found the text at http://www.sfbach.org/repertoire/dapacemdomine.html =A0 Da pacem, Domine, in diebus nostris Quia non est alius Qui pugnet pro nobis Nisi tu Deus noster. Give peace, o Lord, in our time Because there is no one else Who will fight for us If not You, our God.   According to=20 http://www.sibeliusmusic.com/cgi-bin/show_score.pl?scoreid=3D59875 Pax Domini is a Gregorian chant.   Then at http://perso.wanadoo.fr/langlais/o-p-o.htm I discovered that in Langlais' collection Offrande =E0 Marie, which I do not have, one of the pieces bears the title Regina pacis. So that might be the same tune as the one that appears in the Poem of Peace.   The three musical phrases attached to these three texts in Langlais' Poem o= f Peace are all different from each other.   So the solution is: three different musical motifs, from three different sources. =20     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu       on 11/22/04 9:26 PM, Liquescent at quilisma@cox.net wrote:   > "Da pacem, Domine" is a VERY familiar text, but I can't find the music > ANYWHERE. Strange ... it was probably in "Cantus ad Processiones" which > I no longer own ... I KNOW we sang it. >=20 > Cheers, >=20 > Bud >=20 > Randolph Runyon wrote: >=20 >> Thanks, Bud. The other fragments of text in the music are: "Pax Domini= " >> and "Da pacem Domine." What little Latin I know is enough to translate >> those lines! Langlais doesn't quote the words "ora pro nobis." In all >> three instances, the words appear below the first few notes of the chant= (I >> term I bandy about loosely, I know), which then continues for a while >> without them. >>=20 >>=20 >> Randy Runyon >> Music Director >> Zion Lutheran Church >> Hamilton, Ohio >> runyonr@muohio.edu >>=20 >>=20 >>=20 >>=20 >> on 11/22/04 8:58 PM, Liquescent at quilisma@cox.net wrote: >>=20 >>=20 >>> "Queen of Peace" is one of Mary's titles in the Litany of Loretto ... >>> the melody for THAT is on p. 1857 of the "typical" edition of the Liber >>> Usualis. >>>=20 >>> It's not listed as an Antiphon in either the Liber or the Antiphonale >>> Monasticum; that means unless it's an Antiphon or a Responsory at >>> Mattins (which is in a separate book that I don't have), it's probably >>> the Litany he's referring to. What's the rest of the text? All the >>> Litany says is "Regina pacis, ora pro nobis." >>>=20 >>> Cheers, >>>=20 >>> Bud >>>=20 >>=20 >>=20 >>=20 >> ****************************************************************** >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >>=20 >>=20 >=20 >=20 >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20    
(back) Subject: Da Pacem From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 22 Nov 2004 18:47:14 -0800   The chant of the Introit is on p. 1056 of the Liber ... I was thinking it was a Short Responsory.   Cheers,   Bud