PipeChat Digest #4922 - Tuesday, November 23, 2004
 
music for Epiphany
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Elgar
  by "Eric James McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu>
Two-Organ Concert in Allentown PA (X-posted)
  by "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net>
[LONG] David Briggs and some Presbyterians in Birmingham, part 2 of 2
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Helmsley
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: Helmsley
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: [LONG] David Briggs and some Presbyterians in Birmingham, part 2 of 2
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Helmsley
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
RE: Helmsley
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Colin & Composers
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Colin & Composers
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
RE: Colin & Composers
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Candles
  by "bgsx" <bgsx52@sympatico.ca>
Re: Colin & Composers
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Howells, memory, WAS ...some Presbyterians in Birmingham, part 2 of 2
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Howells, memory, WAS ...OOPS!
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Helmsley
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Helmsley
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: music for Epiphany From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 16:16:03 -0800   HYMNS, ANTHEMS, RESPONSORIES, ETC.       We Have Seen His Star In The East - C. Grassi - SAB   All They From Saba Shall Come - C. Grassi - SAB   The Kings of Tharsis - C. Grass - SAB       N.B. - These are anthems, NOT the complete texts of the Propers       Hymn - The Son of God To Jordan Came - Parry - unison (set to Jerusalem with the full accompaniment, not the watered-down one from the Episcopal Hymnal 1982)   Hymn - O Christ, Thou Wast For Us Baptized - David McK. Williams - unison (set to "Georgetown")   Hymn - Why, Cruel Herod, Shouldst Thou Fear - the chant + Victoria's SATB fauxbourdons       PROPERS FOR THE EUCHARIST       Feast of the Epiphany   3-Part Gospel for the Epiphany for three deacons, or soloists and ad lib percussions, handbells and choir   Epiphany 1 - In Excelso Throno   Epiphany 1 - Feast of the Holy Family   Epiphany 2   Epiphany 3       FEAST OF THE PURIFICATION       Antiphon - Thou Shalt Purge Me (Asperges) - SATB fauxbourdon   Antiphon - To Be A Light To Lighten The Gentiles - the chant + SATB fauxbourdons for Nunc dimittis   Responsory - O Lord, Arise, Help Us - SATB fauxbourdon   Responsory - Make Ready Thy Bridal Chamber, O Sion - SATB fauxbourdon   Responsory - It Was Revealed Unto Simeon By The Holy Ghost - SATB fauxbourdon   Responsory - They Offered For Him Unto the Lord       PROPERS FOR THE EUCHARIST - Introit, Gradual, Alleluia, Offertory, Communion + Psalm 111 - no Rossini for this one (grin)       Final Antiphon BVM - Hail, Queen of Heaven, Enthroned - SAB - C. Rossini       I ask a donation of US $1 per page for the masters of the things you actually USE; make all the copies you like; download them and LOOK at them for free. They're available as PDFs, Sibelius 1.4 files, or Scorch HTML files (Scorch is a free download from Sibelius' website, and allows you to play and transpose the pieces, but not edit them).   PLEASE SPECIFY WHICH YOU'D LIKE.   DONATION INFO:   Checks or money orders by snail mail:   Raymond H. Clark 3344 32nd St. San Diego CA 92104-4738   Checks or credit cards via PayPal:   beejayusa@cox.net (NOTE: different from MY e-mail address. It's the family account)   Sorry, I can only accept donations from outside the US via PayPal; otherwise the bank charges US $35 to process checks.   Lenten music next ....       Cheers,       Bud                                              
(back) Subject: Re: Elgar From: "Eric James McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 16:30:49 -0800   Alan, believe me, among such an esteemed group as PipeChat (and I mean that!), I am pleased just to finally have something intelligent to contribute!   Eric -- I figure one intelligent contribution per year is just about my speed       ------------------- > On 11/23/04 12:06 AM, "Eric McKirdy" <emckirdy@gladstone.uoregon.edu> wrote: >=20 > > Despite a veritable list of compositions for just about every combination of > > instruments you might imagine, Elgar only wrote two intended for unaccompanied > > organ =8B eleven vesper voluntaries and a sonata. At age 14, he was appointed to > > be the assistant organist at some Jesuit church where his father was the > > organist, and most of his musical training was self-inflicted. >=20 > Without THIS LIST, and people like Eric McKirdy, where/how would one LEARN > things like this? For better or worse, even his syntax follows the Brit > models. =20 >=20 > Thank you! >=20 > Alan=20 >=20 Re  
(back) Subject: Two-Organ Concert in Allentown PA (X-posted) From: "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 19:50:33 -0500   On Friday, November 26 (the day after Thanksgiving), 7:30 p.m., Richard = van Auken and Stephen Williams will perform a holiday concert for two organs = at St. John's Lutheran Church in downtown Allentown, Pennsylvania. The = program was offered last year around this time, but the event was victim of a blizzard that began two hours prior and basically whited it out, as it = were. The decision was made to repeat the program this year, so here we go.   Voluntary and Air / Purcell Christmas Fantasy / Callahan The Nutcracker Suite / Tchaikovsky Dialogue Monastique / Purvis Christmas Suite for Two Organs / Brian Henklemann (composed for the = occasion last year) Ave Maria / Schubert Christmas Medley / Nielson and Young Concerto Gregoriano (complete) / Yon   The organs are the IV/87 1993 Reuter in St. John's, and a III/100+ instrument built by Walker Technical Company with a console by William Zeiler. The collective sound is not so overwhelming as you might imagine, but is rather warm and full, helped lots by the fairly gracious room. = It'll all be great fun, I'm sure. If you're in the area, and are interested, = drop on by.   Stephen Williams      
(back) Subject: [LONG] David Briggs and some Presbyterians in Birmingham, part 2 of 2 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 18:52:40 -0600   David Briggs and some Presbyterians in Birmingham Part 2 of 2     Please bear with me; my vernacular is somewhat subdued, and the pistons in my brain are not firing on all cylinders; the electronic ignition, like that on my stove, is erratic. I can=92t stick a butane torch in my ear, so sometimes I fill up with a gaseous substance that comes rolling out in pedestrian prose. I do find my powers of description quite lacking, and I apologize.   Anyway, I checked into my hotel and changed into suitable recital-going attire, then returned to the church, where I was shown the ins and outs of getting around for practice and the lesson the next day. The church is an intimate room with high ceilings, colorful windows flanking the sides, and lots of little galleries: one in the front, one in the back for congregation, and one on each side, sort of like =91royalty = boxes=92, filled with those who wished to see the organist while he played. Jeff had told how this congregation had broken from another Presbyterian church downtown in 1915, this group wanting to be more socially activist. So they worshipped in a Jewish temple until able to build their own church. =20   The organ was the typical dueling 2-chambered affair with matching flanking facing fa=E7ade towers. The program:   Sonata No. 2 in B-flat, Opus 87a =96 Elgar Scherzo Symphonique =96 Cochereau, transcr. by Briggs Rhapsody No. 1 in D-flat =96 Howells Marche Heroique =96 Brewer Symphonie en Improvisation =96 Briggs, based on 2 themes provided   This was a good-sized crowd, and they were fairly sophisticated. I had told Briggs at lunch I had not heard the Elgar before, but now think it was part of Tom Murray=92s program at the Mormon Tabernacle last summer. I could be wrong, because Murray instead may have transcribed the original Severn Suite, or that could have been the night I had award-winning dead cow and bought the temporary liquor license to drink at the restaurant before the recital (I loved that cow =96 even now, thoughts of her bring tears to my eyes. Then there was that tattoo parlour and biker pool hall =96 such lovely Mormon people). No, Murray did do Opus 87 Severn Suite there. Elgar wrote five movements: introduction, toccata, fugue, cadenza and coda. Briggs was very sure of himself and had left nothing to chance. The toccata was virtuosic; the fugue was extremely moving, very English, showcasing some nice sounds on this organ. Not that I like the piece that much better than the last time I heard it: I paid better attention to Briggs=92 rendering, but liked the MoTab organ better..   The Cochereau concert improvisation was magical. I had never heard any of his recordings or others=92 transcriptions, and Briggs stated that it took about four hours to transcribe about each minute of Cochereau=92s improvisations. And I cannot understand why Colin does not like Howells =96 this rhapsody was mystical and lush, the best English stuff on the program. The Brewer was very Elgarish and British.   Briggs studied improvisation with Langlais, and there was a definite Langlais influence to his improvisation on =93Oh! Suzanna!=94 and = =93Lasst uns erfreuen=94, done as a four-part symphony of about 25 minutes, with introduction and allegro, scherzo, andante espressivo and final. If you like improvisation, this is the man to hear. The scherzo weaved the two themes together, before the artist introduced a Bolero-esque building to a climax. It was a hoot.   Sometimes when I listen to a recitalist, a particular organ piece will come to mind. While hearing Briggs play, for some reason I wondered if he had ever played the Bossi Etude Symphonique. Guess what =96 he has! = I bought a 2-CD set afterward of him at Gloucester, and there it was. I spoke to him and my new acquaintances briefly at the post-recital reception before finding my way back to my hotel. I dined alone on dead cow (a pitiful creature, no relation to the one in Salt Lake City) with a passable Manhattan, and listened to a guest and two waiters tell their tales of woe. I couldn=92t wait to pay the check and escape.   The next morning I awakened after a restless night, packed, checked out and made my way back to the church. I had the organ to myself for about an hour and a half, with only the janitorial crew bumping around, one complaining about all the music in minor keys he had heard that week. After about 40 minutes of warming up and examining the organ, I realized the need for morning caffeine, and made my way to a break room, where coffee and soft drinks were found. =20   Jeff came in and we plunged into the Mendelssohn Sonata No. 3. After I played through it the first time, I looked around to judge his reaction. He was genuinely pleasantly surprised, which was gratifying to know I was not as bad as he had feared. I had secretly worried about my proficiency, not wishing to make too big a fool out of myself. I had only had a little over a month with the music I had selected, during a time where lunch hours and time after work for practice had been severely infringed.   I had planned for us to play around with the Mendelssohn and the two Bach pieces. However, we spent two hours just analyzing and tearing apart the Mendelssohn, playing over phrases and sections, talking about breaks, breathing, sustaining, fingering, registration ideas. At first he didn=92t want to write all over the score, and I told him to have at it, taking the pencil from him from time to time to write down something he was saying. We finally realized that we hadn=92t touched the Bach, = and took an extra thirty minutes to hit the high spots of the third trio sonata and the E-flat major P&F before planning another meeting. =20   All in all it was a productive and entertaining weekend. Next time I shall be foolhardy enough to attempt the entire trip and lesson in one day =96 saints preserve us! I may be getting too old for this pace =96 organ crawling, lessons, salsa dancing, and lots of driving.   A lot more interesting things happened during the weekend events, but I=92m just too tired to fill you in. I have two marathon days at work, hitting the ends of two counties and several points in between; I have not planned anything for Thanksgiving, much less Christmas decorating. A day of trials awaits the following Monday. =20   Happy Thanksgiving and an interesting Advent to you all.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Helmsley From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 20:49:31 -0500       On 23 Nov 2004 at 11:51, M Fox expounded:   > There is a Rhapsody on Helmsley by William S. Lloyd Webber in the > Advent volume of Novello's Festal Voluntaries.   This arrangement is also in the Advent volume of the Augsburg Organ = Library.   In this volume is also a two-movement (Fanfare and Trio) arrangement by = Karl Osterland. Registration calls for a Solo Trumpet and a second manual set = up for 8, 4, 2, and Mixture, as well as pedal. "Freely, with majesty".   --Shirley    
(back) Subject: Re: Helmsley From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 20:57:06 EST   i'm surprised there hasn't been a leona joke made yet...   scot in spokane  
(back) Subject: Re: [LONG] David Briggs and some Presbyterians in Birmingham, part 2 of 2 From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 18:23:33 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Don't get me going Glenda!   You mentioned the "H" word again.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Glenda <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > And I cannot understand why Colin > does not like Howells > =96 this rhapsody was mystical and lush, the best > English stuff on the > program.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! - What will yours do? http://my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Helmsley From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 20:39:59 -0600   Darn! Concordia Pulishing House will be publishing a setting of mine on = Helmsley some time next year along with four other of my pieces: "Away = in a Manger" (using the 2 common tunes); Toccata on "Forest Green; "We = Three Kings"; and "Christ, unser Herr, zu Jordan kam."   Bob Lind =20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Travis L. Evans=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2004 12:36 PM Subject: Helmsley     I'm trying to find a good postlude on Lo, He Comes with Clouds = Descending, tune of Helmsley.   Any information would be greatly appreciated.   Travis Evans  
(back) Subject: RE: Helmsley From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 20:38:30 -0600   Well, Bob, that doesn=92t do us a lot of good THIS year!   Cheers,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (Cracker Barrel is looking more and more appealing come Thursday)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Robert Lind Sent: Tuesday, November 23, 2004 8:40 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Helmsley   Darn! Concordia Pulishing House will be publishing a setting of mine on Helmsley some time next year along with four other of my pieces: "Away in a Manger" (using the 2 common tunes); Toccata on "Forest Green; "We Three Kings"; and=A0"Christ, unser Herr,=A0zu Jordan kam."        
(back) Subject: Colin & Composers From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 21:05:59 -0600   Colin......I look at a list of the "major" western composers and draw the opposite conclusion you do. Of the whole bunch, only Bach is a major composer for organ. I think what hurts organists is that most of the = organ composers outside of Bach are second rate--by comparison--to Handel, = Mozart, Chopin, Beethoven, et. al. Flame away.   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: Colin & Composers From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 22:22:42 EST     In a message dated 11/23/04 9:09:02 PM, kzrev@rr1.net writes:     > Colin......I look at a list of the "major" western composers and draw the > opposite conclusion you do.=A0 Of the whole bunch, only Bach is a major > composer for organ.=A0 I think what hurts organists is that most of the or= gan > composers outside of Bach are second rate--by comparison--to Handel, Mozar= t, > Chopin, Beethoven, et. al.=A0 Flame away. >=20 > Dennis Steckley > Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines >=20 >=20   I guess Franck and Mendelssohn are totally second rate-oh, Messiaen and Rege= r=20 sucked too. I could go on and on...but its just not worth it. gfc-saddened       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: RE: Colin & Composers From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 16:32:18 +1300   >Colin......I look at a list of the "major" western composers and draw the opposite conclusion you do. Of the whole bunch, only Bach is a major composer for organ. I think what hurts organists is that most of the = organ composers outside of Bach are second rate--by comparison--to Handel, = Mozart, Chopin, Beethoven, et. al. Flame away.   You're right here, I'm sure. If only Vivaldi, Haydn and Mozart had written music for the organ: and don't remind me of the stuff we call their organ works.   Mind you, other great composers had their "gaps" also. Chopin wrote for = the piano, and that was it. He didn't write orchestral music, just as a bit of background for one or two piano works. As far as I'm aware he wrote no choral music. He wrote nothing for the organ. In spite of that, he's one = of my very favouritest mostest composers, as his piano music is supremely wonderful.   To me, someone who writes great melodies is wonderful, wherever those melodies are used. So, amongst my favourite composers I would list Scott-Skinner and Marshall who wrote endlessly musical Scots fiddle music; Johann Strauss, too, as the writer of wonderful lilting melodies but = nothing complicated or "serious" like a symphony. Maybe the songwriter Percy = French should be included, though little heard these days.   Against that, I've never even once heard anyone play Titelouze at an organ recital or as a voluntary, and only once heard Frescobaldi, yet I believe they wrote really great music. Small pieces can be sheer magic.   Sometimes, one composer can lead to another. For many years my wife = couldn't listen to classical mjusic apart from the great melodists like = Tchaikovsky. Then, while studying some 20 years ago she fell in love with Vivaldi, finding his work helped her study. Now, her favourite music of all is "The Four Season". Gradually, she said the other day, she's beginning to love what she calls the "courtly yet sweet elegance" of Mozart. I'm predicting she will fall for his work, then gradually learn to love Haydn as well, = and maybe eventually Beethoven. Since she developed a love for Vivaldi, she = has found, through being dragged to a "Messiah" performance, that she can love Handel as well. But my beloved J.S.Bach is still boring nothings to her. Maybe that'll change, maybe it won't, but I know for sure that her loving Johann Strauss lilting melodies is what taught her to love the orchestra = to begin with.   Rather than express regret for the lack of the "noted" composers' organ works, perhaps we should instead give thanks for what we do have. I've = been trying to do this in all kinds of areas of life. I'm even trying to = convince myself to quit moaning about the less-than-adequate 2m Allen we have in = the parish here, and give thanks for being allowed to play for services on an instrument that is at least mechanically reliable and does have 2m & P, = and is tolerable for some things. As I say, I'm trying to convince myself, though I haven't gotten there yet, despite 3 years of effort! :-)   If you don't know Scott-Skinner and Marshall, perhaps see if you can find = an old recording of someone like Ron Gonnella playing their music on his fabulous Amati fiddle.   Muddled, perhaps, but unrepentant, Ross    
(back) Subject: Candles From: "bgsx" <bgsx52@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 22:43:54 -0500     http://snipurl.com/auyc   "A visit to church may be good for the soul but not so good for the lungs, a new study shows."      
(back) Subject: Re: Colin & Composers From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 20:06:03 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I just "knew" someone would say something like this!   Here we go on a tour of the entire history of world music! I think I should have said, organist/composers, rather than composers for organ, but the point was, the organ was a part of their lives and had an important bearing on what they wrote.   First, a bit of machine-gun fire.....   Mozart played the organ.....he played St Bavvo, Haarlem at the age of 7, and got kicked out of church for playing something frivolous or other. Although technically written for a large flute clock, designed by Fr Primitivus Niamiche (try saying that after a few glasses of bourbon), many think that he had the Bavo organ in mind when he wrote those fabulous works which include the K608.   Chopin is regarded,(though I certainly do not share the view),as a poor composer by some people....a great poet, but a poor composer. Don't ask me to get embroiled in all that!   Brahms wrote for the organ....hardly second rate Dennis!   Franck was the father of French Romanticism, but I forgot to mention him in my list....he comes under etc etc   Elgar was a magnificent composer, a brillinat lyricist and, above all, a contrapuntal genius.   Of the early music schools, there are certain composers who are absolutely at the leading edge.....Bull, Byrd, Sweelinck, Scheidemann, Scheidt, Froberger, the Couperins, Clerembault, de Grigny, Rameau, Soler, Bruhns, Frescobaldi, Pachelbel, Gabrieli, Monterverdi....all of them organists so far as I am aware.   Reger hovered between Wagnerianism and the neo-classical; in fact achieving what Brahms failed to do. He was, as an organ composer, infinitely more productive then old J S Bach! (I "think" Reger's output for organ is the largest of all). Unfashionable perhaps, but certainly not second-rate!   Hindemith wrote for organ, and also inspired much that is modern U.S. music.   Dvorak, Janacek, Smetana.....think "Prague organ school.....Dvorak wrote for organ, as did Janacek.   Messaien is "regarded" as a front line composer, though frankly, I don't like his organ music by and large, but admire his piano music.   Mendelssohn was also a major force in romantic composition, and a superlative organist.   Glasunov is an interesting link between Parisian music and Russian music......weren't his P & F dedicated to Dupre? (I'd have to check this out to be certain) Glasunov was the tutor and mentor of Shostakovich.   Then there was Saint-Saens.....perhaps B+ grade as a composer, but he wrote a fairly notable organ symphony, the wonderful "Carnival of the animals", some magnificent salon pieces, was a superlative pianist/organist and wrote "Samson & Delilah" among other well known works.   Oooops! Musn't forget Schutz!   As Italian organs only had keyboards, I guess "every" Italian composer was an organist, and the same may be true of Scarlatti, but I cannot say for certain.   Let's not forget Palestrina and Victoria.   Musn't forget Liszt of course.   I could go on, but we'll be here until Christmas!!!   The $6,000,000 question is this........   If you had to choose between 9 Beethoven Symphonies (inspired of course by Bach) plus a handful of Russians (inspired by French organists) and all the works ever written by organists or organ-composers, which of them would you discard first?   Food for thought indeed!   Of course, I haven't started to include the organists who were outstanding teachers, mentors or academics.....that would take us to another Christmas!!   Then there are the "organist/composers" that we keep to ourselves...... Tournemire, Durufle, Dupre, Buxtehude etc etc.   Who knows, the world may get wise eventually.   Organists rule!! OK?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> wrote:   > Colin......I look at a list of the "major" western > composers and draw the > opposite conclusion you do. Of the whole bunch, > only Bach is a major > composer for organ. I think what hurts organists is > that most of the organ > composers outside of Bach are second rate--by > comparison--to Handel, Mozart, > Chopin, Beethoven, et. al. Flame away.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Howells, memory, WAS ...some Presbyterians in Birmingham, part 2 of 2 From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 20:21:37 -0800 (PST)   Just to quick bits on two posts:   Howells music is lovely! The Psalm Preludes are always enjoyable. The wonderful Stephen Roberts gave a long post on memory and organists. Does'nt the University of Michigan School of Music require extensive = memory work from its organ students? If incorrect, please accept a "mea = culpa" in advance. TDH     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! =96 What will yours do?
(back) Subject: Re: Howells, memory, WAS ...OOPS! From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 20:27:50 -0800 (PST)   Pardon the mispellin...Tis late and it was a long day!   Should read : "Just TWO quick bits on two posts:" TDH     --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Meet the all-new My Yahoo! =96 Try it today!
(back) Subject: Re: Helmsley From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 23 Nov 2004 22:48:12 -0600   Hi! I second the reccomendation of William Lloyd Weber's "Rhapsody on Helmsley" It is in the sort of English Romantic vein- very fitting for the hymntune. I used it in a hymn festival for the Fox Valley IL AGO Chapter and got some positive comments on it and I will be using it as the postlude at church this coming Sunday. I play it from the Augusburg Organ Library: Advent.   By the way, if you all play hymntune settings and don't own the Augsburg Volumes mentioned above, you should! They have tons of good quality hymn arrangements and other free pieces for every season of the year. The large part of all of the volumes is GOOD QUALITY SETTINGS!   And to Bob Lind, I CAN'T WAIT for your setting of Helmsley. I'm sure it will be wonderful- that is one of my favorite tunes. Do let us know when it comes out.     Blessings, Beau Surratt      
(back) Subject: Re: Helmsley From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 00:04:15 EST   Check out "After the Last Verse," by Malcolm Archer -- very short, but a great postlude, and a terrific starting point for your own improvisation. = Kevin Mayhew is publisher, I think, but I'm working by memory here.