PipeChat Digest #4927 - Thursday, November 25, 2004
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #4925 - 11/25/04
  by "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es>
RE: PipeChat Digest #4925 - 11/25/04
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
RE: Birmingham, etc
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Colin & Composers
  by "Staffan Thuringer" <staffan_thuringer@yahoo.com.au>
RE: Birmingham, etc
  by "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk>
RE: Birmingham, etc
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
the 19th century
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Birmingham, etc
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Birmingham, etc
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Birmingham, etc
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
RE: Birmingham, etc
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Re: BBC News: Church air is "threat to health"
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: CONTACT INFORMATION FOR BOB WALKER
  by "Christopher J. Howerter" <christophhowerter@sbcglobal.net>
Thanksgiving Service Webcast
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Thanksgiving Service Webcast
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Briggs' health
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
stop list competition
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
RE: Birmingham, etc
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4925 - 11/25/04 From: "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 11:04:53 +0100   Quoting Bob Conway:   > All the same, they have a fantastic organ in Symphony Hall, - you > should try to hear it sometime!   Isn't this the organ mentioned in Audsley in which the builders held a party inside one of the big open wood pipes (presumably while it was still horizontal), toasting its health in beer?   Talking of beer and organs reminds me of my Unfortunate Experience years ago in the Anglican Cathedral in Gibraltar. I bought a supposedly duty-free digital camera and retired to a pub to enjoy a modest amount of real English beer while reading the instructions.   I then entered the cathedral to take a photo of the organ (Bryceson Bros & Ellis, 1880). While so engaged, I was approached by a member of the Cathedral's clergy who asked me if I'd like to play it. Now I have zero pretentions of being an organist but I can play 2 or 3 tunes from memory, so I ascended to the loft to have a go.   I launched impetuously into BWV 565 but after a few bars my mind went totally blank, leaving me no option but to stop suddenly. At this point I became aware of sounds from below. I turned and peered down to discover to my horror that about 500 bus loads of tourists had entered the Cathedral and were standing there looking up at me, expectantly. Some had even taken seats, clearly settling in to enjoy the recital...   Moral: Beer and Bach don't mix (even though he used to pop out for a stein or two during the sermon).   Peter.    
(back) Subject: RE: PipeChat Digest #4925 - 11/25/04 From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 10:08:19 -0000   I don't know, but that sounds as if it was probably the Town Hall organ. = The Klais in Symphony Hall dates from 2001   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Peter Rodwell Sent: 25 November 2004 10:05 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4925 - 11/25/04   Quoting Bob Conway:   > All the same, they have a fantastic organ in Symphony Hall, - you > should try to hear it sometime!   Isn't this the organ mentioned in Audsley in which the builders held a party inside one of the big open wood pipes (presumably while it was still horizontal), toasting its health in beer?   Talking of beer and organs reminds me of my Unfortunate Experience years ago in the Anglican Cathedral in Gibraltar. I bought a supposedly duty-free digital camera and retired to a pub to enjoy a modest amount of real English beer while reading the instructions.   I then entered the cathedral to take a photo of the organ (Bryceson Bros & Ellis, 1880). While so engaged, I was approached by a member of the Cathedral's clergy who asked me if I'd like to play it. Now I have zero pretentions of being an organist but I can play 2 or 3 tunes from memory, so I ascended to the loft to have a go.   I launched impetuously into BWV 565 but after a few bars my mind went totally blank, leaving me no option but to stop suddenly. At this point I became aware of sounds from below. I turned and peered down to discover to my horror that about 500 bus loads of tourists had entered the Cathedral and were standing there looking up at me, expectantly. Some had even taken seats, clearly settling in to enjoy the recital...   Moral: Beer and Bach don't mix (even though he used to pop out for a stein or two during the sermon).   Peter.     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 05:39:43 -0500   At 04:32 AM 11/25/2004, Will Light wrote: >Actually you are both wrong! Birmingham is most definitely in THE = MIDLANDS.   Very much in the Midlands! The North is Yorkshire, just South of = Scotland, - you know, where the Black Watch come from!   Will's comments about Brum are right on the ball, the city has changed immensely over the past several years, and is well worth a visit.   His plug for Coventry is right on as well. My brother lives in a small village just outside Rugby, and his wife is from Coventry, so I get to see =   all of the area whenever I go to stay with them. I rather think that Rugby's only claim to fame is the famed Rugby School, there is not much else.   Coventry is always worth the trip, if only to renew acquaintance with the cathedral and its organ! But there a many other fine organs to be heard = in Coventry. Unfortunately, the demise of the British Motor Car has not helped the people who live there.   In my youth the Midlands was the centre of British manufacturing, - but now, I fear that it has all gone "offshore", - but don't knock it!   In fact, if you are a Shakespeare fan, Stratford is only just up the road! I am not, (very few English people are, too much stuffed down our throats at school) - but they have really good beer there!   End of plug!   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: Colin & Composers From: "Staffan Thuringer" <staffan_thuringer@yahoo.com.au> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 22:06:30 +1100 (EST)       "John F oss" wrote:   Cesar Franck is definitely top tier - despite his fairly small output....   - Tournmemire, Widor and others of the school continued where he left off. "...   Durufle's work is of the highest calibre, ...some may argue that Stanford = is as good as Mendelssohn, or C S lang the equal of Leon Boellmann - or whatever grabs you! =3D=3D=3D   Dear PipeChat list,   No one has mentioned Guilmant. He produced lots of organ music, and at = least the Sonatas and The Practical Organist are, in my opinion, very well = crafted.   Regards   Staffan Thuringer   http://users.bigpond.net.au/elteno/Staffan/stuindex.htm         --------------------------------- Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies.  
(back) Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc From: "alantaylor1" <alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 12:02:28 -0000   I wouldn't agree that the Klais has been an unmitigated success. It really depends on where you sit in the hall. Also, the pedal organ has to be coupled to the manuals to give enough power.   Ian Bell said, at the Royal Albert Hall last Saturday that it would seem that organ builders might have lost the art of being able to build such concert hall organs. Certainly Manchester has its problems as well.   Alan Taylor London   -   --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.801 / Virus Database: 544 - Release Date: 24/11/2004    
(back) Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 01:09:55 +1300   >Birmingham is the UK's second city in population terms   What's the difference between Glasgow and Birmingham, then? I know Glasgow fairly well and have not been to Birmingham, but I've often heard it said that Glasgow is the UK's second-biggest city. Got me curious, now.   Ross    
(back) Subject: the 19th century From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 04:30:28 -0800   Composers suffer from fashions as much as organs ... when I was at school in the early 1960s, one jumped straight from Franck to Messiaen and ignored everything and everybody in between, except Dupre. Guilmant, Tournemire, Widor, Mulet, and Vierne were all consigned to outer darkness; Mendelssohn's 2nd and 6th Sonatas were tolerated, but one "did not play the Fugue of the 2nd." Reger was the subject of much derision, both in organ class and in theory class. I don't think I knew that Liszt WROTE anything for organ until after I graduated <g>.   Guilmant's music IS well-crafted, "crafted" being the operative word. I don't think it rises to the level of greatness; The Liturgical Organist is more interesting than The Practical Organist, but that's an opinion = <g>.   The debt we owe Guilmant is for his massive "Le Maitres" series, which rescued a great body of early French organ music from oblivion. We have a new edition of Guilmant's own music; is anybody reprinting "Le Maitres"?   Cheers,   Bud       Staffan Thuringer wrote:   > > "John F oss" > wrote: > > Cesar Franck is definitely top tier - despite his fairly small > output.... > > - Tournmemire, Widor and others of the school > continued where he left off. "... > > Durufle's work is of the highest calibre, ...some may argue that > Stanford is as good as Mendelssohn, or C S lang the > equal of Leon Boellmann - or whatever grabs you! > =3D=3D=3D > > Dear PipeChat list, > > No one has mentioned Guilmant. He produced lots of organ music, and > at least the Sonatas and The Practical Organist are, in my opinion, > very well crafted. > > Regards > > Staffan Thuringer > > http://users.bigpond.net.au/elteno/Staffan/stuindex.htm > > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > Find local movie times and trailers on Yahoo! Movies. > <http://au.rd.yahoo.com/mail/tagline/*http://au.movies.yahoo.com>      
(back) Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 05:08:53 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   There is little difference Ross.   The people of Glasgow remain largely unintelligable due to the fact that they don't move their mouths and speak from the back of the throat and call everyone "Jimmy."   Everyone is drunk!   The best thing about Glasgow is Billy Connelly, who recently went to NZ.   Birmingham is the same without skirts.....   In Birmingham, they mumble at you. The technique of Brum-speak is to set the bottom lip like cement, and speak with just the top lip moving.   They don't wear skirts in Birmingham....not even the women!   Keeping this well on topic, both cities have some fine organs, including the Kelvingrove four-manual at Glasgow, built by Ross's favourite organ-builder, T C Lewis.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   > >Birmingham is the UK's second city in population > terms > > What's the difference between Glasgow and > Birmingham, then?     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Meet the all-new My Yahoo! - Try it today! http://my.yahoo.com    
(back) Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 13:27:17 -0000   Well a little research gives the following figures:   POPULATION OF THE LARGER BRITISH CITIES (and some county areas too) London 7,074,265 Birmingham 1,020,589 Leeds 726,939 Glasgow 616,430 Sheffield 530,375 Bradford 483,422 Liverpool 467,995 Edinburgh 448,850 Manchester 430,818 Bristol 399,633 Kirklees 388,807 Fife 349,300 Wirral 329,179 North Lanarkshire 325,940 Wakefield 317,342 Cardiff 315,040 Dudley 312,194 Wigan 309,786 East Riding 308,689 South Lanarkshire 307,450 Coventry 306,503 Belfast 297,300 Leicester 294,830 Sunderland 294,261 Sandwell 292,196 Doncaster 291,804 Stockport 291,080 Sefton 289,739 Nottingham 283,969 Newcastle-upon-Tyne 282,338 Kingston-upon-Hull 266,775 Bolton 265,449 Walsall 262,593 Plymouth 255,826 Rotherham 255,342 Stoke-on-Trent 254,438 Wolverhampton 244,453 Rhondda, Cynon, Taff 240,117 South Gloucestershire 235,129 Derby 233,708 Swansea 230,180 Salford 229,179 Aberdeenshire 227,430 Barnsley 227,213 Tameside 220,722 Oldham 220,172 Trafford 218,893 Aberdeen 217,260 Southampton 214,859 Highland 208,700 Rochdale 207,563 Solihull 203,922 Gateshead 200,968 Milton Keynes 197,131 North Tyneside 193,619 Calderdale 192,844 Northampton 192,382 Portsmouth 190,370   So Glasgow comes fourth after London, Birmingham and Leeds.   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TheShieling Sent: 25 November 2004 12:10 To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc   >Birmingham is the UK's second city in population terms   What's the difference between Glasgow and Birmingham, then? I know Glasgow fairly well and have not been to Birmingham, but I've often heard it said that Glasgow is the UK's second-biggest city. Got me curious, now.   Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Birmingham, etc From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 07:25:45 -0600   It depends whether you count just the city within the city limits or = include the greater metropolitan area as well.   In the 2001 census the populations within the city limits were: Birmingham 503,821; Glasgow 577,869. But their metropolitan districts were: = Birmingham 1,311,270; Glasgow 1,099,400.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, November 25, 2004 6:09 AM Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc     > >Birmingham is the UK's second city in population > terms > > What's the difference between Glasgow and Birmingham, then? I know = Glasgow > fairly well and have not been to Birmingham, but I've often heard it = said > that Glasgow is the UK's second-biggest city. Got me curious, now.      
(back) Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 13:29:41 -0000   Er - correction Cities and Towns - only a select few of these are = Cities.   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Will Light Sent: 25 November 2004 13:27 To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc   Well a little research gives the following figures:   POPULATION OF THE LARGER BRITISH CITIES (and some county areas too) London 7,074,265 Birmingham 1,020,589=20 Leeds 726,939=20 Glasgow 616,430 =20 Sheffield 530,375=20 Bradford 483,422 =20 Liverpool 467,995=20 Edinburgh 448,850=20 Manchester 430,818=20 Bristol 399,633=20 Kirklees 388,807 =20 Fife 349,300 Wirral 329,179 North Lanarkshire 325,940 Wakefield 317,342 =20 Cardiff 315,040 =20 Dudley 312,194 =20 Wigan 309,786 =20 East Riding 308,689 =20 South Lanarkshire 307,450 =20 Coventry 306,503 =20 Belfast 297,300=20 Leicester 294,830 =20 Sunderland 294,261 =20 Sandwell 292,196 =20 Doncaster 291,804 =20 Stockport 291,080 =20 Sefton 289,739 =20 Nottingham 283,969 =20 Newcastle-upon-Tyne 282,338=20 Kingston-upon-Hull 266,775 =20 Bolton 265,449 =20 Walsall 262,593 =20 Plymouth 255,826 =20 Rotherham 255,342 =20 Stoke-on-Trent 254,438=20 Wolverhampton 244,453 =20 Rhondda, Cynon, Taff 240,117 =20 South Gloucestershire 235,129 =20 Derby 233,708 =20 Swansea 230,180 =20 Salford 229,179=20 Aberdeenshire 227,430 =20 Barnsley 227,213 =20 Tameside 220,722 =20 Oldham 220,172 =20 Trafford 218,893=20 Aberdeen 217,260=20 Southampton 214,859 =20 Highland 208,700 =20 Rochdale 207,563=20 Solihull 203,922=20 Gateshead 200,968 =20 Milton Keynes 197,131 =20 North Tyneside 193,619 =20 Calderdale 192,844 =20 Northampton 192,382 =20 Portsmouth 190,370   So Glasgow comes fourth after London, Birmingham and Leeds.   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TheShieling Sent: 25 November 2004 12:10 To: 'PipeChat' Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc   >Birmingham is the UK's second city in population terms=20   What's the difference between Glasgow and Birmingham, then? I know = Glasgow fairly well and have not been to Birmingham, but I've often heard it = said that Glasgow is the UK's second-biggest city. Got me curious, now.   Ross     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Re: BBC News: Church air is "threat to health" From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 21:33:09 +0800   Yes zinc is a hard metal. The pipe sounded about as good as a rolled zinc = 5" Diapason at 8 foot pitch (bottom C) will ever sound! Bob Elms.    
(back) Subject: RE: CONTACT INFORMATION FOR BOB WALKER From: "Christopher J. Howerter" <christophhowerter@sbcglobal.net> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 09:42:55 -0500   Dear Scott,   To answer your question, the number for the Walker Technical Company is (610) 966-2515, and they can transfer you to his cell phone if necessary <wink>. They are in Zionsville, not Zion, which does not exist in PA. I should know as I grew up about 20 minutes away from his workshop in the = town of Emmaus (pronounced ee-may-us), which is just outside of Allentown (recognize this name?) <g>. The first church I ever worked in as organist had a brand new Walker. It was rather impeccable, as I recall it. It = sure knocks the socks off other digital builders whose names mention, except = for on a subliminal level. <g>   Sincerely, Christopher J. Howerter
(back) Subject: CONTACT INFORMATION FOR BOB WALKER (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 24 Nov 2004 23:42:42 EST   Does anyone have contact information for Bob Walker? A phone and email = are preferable, if possible.   Thanks very much in advance!   -Scott   Scott F. Foppiano Memphis, TN (scottfop@aol.com) Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.          
(back) Subject: Thanksgiving Service Webcast From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 09:00:23 -0600   There is a webcast, which I gather will be available all day, from Washington National Cathedral. Lots of good music although it does seem to have a bit of distortion to part of it.   The URL is: http://www.comeandgrow.org/thanksgiving_webcast.htm   Happy Thanksgiving!   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Thanksgiving Service Webcast From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 09:22:44 -0600   And the Service Leaflet is available at: http://www.cathedral.org/cathedral/pdfs/tgiving.pdf   David  
(back) Subject: Briggs' health From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 09:27:03 -0600   I get all those Brits mixed up, Mike.   But seriously, three organists I can never keep straight for some reason are Briggs, Higgs, and Farris. So I couldn't very well ask things like: Are you feeling better after your angina? Didn't you die a couple years back? Didn't I hear you play at so-and-so? Because I can never really be sure . . . . He looks like the same guy, but . . . .   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (who is lousy on names, and getting pretty bad on faces too)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of M Fox Another evocative account! And I'd gather from this that David is fully recovered from what I'm remembering as a fairly severe heart scare a year ago or so, particularly scary for someone so young? I sort of met him in the loft at Notre Dame back in 2002, and he seemed as unpretentious and pleasant as his records show him to be talented. Nice company!        
(back) Subject: stop list competition From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Thu, 25 Nov 2004 14:16:41 -0500   Dear list:   I have a customer with an electro pneumatic organ built in the early 70's. The customer is a school and the organ is located in the schools chapel. 5 years ago the organ was placed into a new, much larger chapel with acoustics that are not very good. The organ is well placed in a gallery = but unfortunately, nothing was done to change the dynamics of the instrument = and it is too "small" in sound to support robust hymn singing everyday at = chapel services. It's also used for weddings and funerals. It is not used for recitals.   The school wishes to get a bigger sound without enlarging the organ and without adding electronic stops, although they might consider some electronic 16's in the pedal.   The organ is two manual and pedal. One division is under expression. The great and pedal are exposed and the organ is mechanically in good shape.   There must be an 8' trumpet in the Swell. There are 6 stops in the swell and 6 in the Great. The pedal is not likely to be changed except for the possible addition of an electronic 16' flue = to help out the lone 16' Bourdon in place already.   Any suggested stop lists assuming the swell and great can be fitted with = all new pipes and bearing in mind the necessity of a new trumpet in the Swell?   Appreciatively AjMead        
(back) Subject: RE: Birmingham, etc From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 08:27:37 +1300   Colin,   You're displaying your Englishness too much :-)Hello,   >The people of Glasgow remain largely unintelligable due to the fact that they don't move their mouths and speak from the back of the throat and call everyone "Jimmy."   That would be "Jimmie", not "Jimmy".   >The best thing about Glasgow is Billy Connelly, who recently went to NZ.   Only temporarily, perhaps? and anyway, he's Connolly, not Connelly.   Keeping this well on topic, both cities have some fine organs, including the Kelvingrove four-manual at Glasgow, built by Ross's favourite organ-builder, T C Lewis.   This organ is not of 4 manuals, and is not even an especially large 3-manual. It certainly sings beautifully, but is not "classical" Lewis as some of the reeds are on higher pressure than the flues - it even has a separate high-pressure blower for them. It's a fun instrument to play, and marvellously situated in a marvellous building. I spent two hours on it 1992.   Ross