PipeChat Digest #4931 - Friday, November 26, 2004
 
Re: stop list competition
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re:  stop list competition
  by "Tom Jones" <tomj@netpath.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #4925359460293845734 - 113/285/054
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: stop list "competition"
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: stop list competition
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: stop list "competition"
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
"stop list competition": serious questions
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re:  stop list competition
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
RE: stop list competition
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
stop-list competition
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
stop list competition
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Unsolicited tidbit
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Colin & Composers
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Disney Hall Organ on CNN
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
RE: stop list competition
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Disney Hall Organ on CNN
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: stop list competition From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 07:55:08 EST   Regarding this little organ in the school chapel, I am still confused... If there is no room for larger scales on the manual chests, and the chests = can't be replaced, why does the school want to replace the pipework? Why =   don't they just hire a voicer to come in and do major tonal refinishing? = If the pipework is decent, a skilled voicer can do some amazing things. Also, I =   understood that no more stopknobs could be added to the console, but = somewhere along the line in this thread, I thought I read that they would consider adding some digital pedal stops. That would require the addition of = extra stopknobs. I suggest that they go back to the original builder of the = instrument and get a quote for a revoicing for the new room, and then talk to a = couple of other tonal finishers. I'm sure it could be done for less that $150,000. = The only thing I would replace would be the 1/2 length Trumpet--I can't = stand 1/2 length chorus reeds. That stop could be mitered couldn't it? Talk to a builder and voicer, you'll be better off for it. Anyway, those are my thoughts. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: stop list competition From: "Tom Jones" <tomj@netpath.net> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 10:28:19 -0500   GREAT -- with six stops, as specified, but nine ranks: Bourdon 16' Principal 8' Chimney Flute 8' Octave 4' Super Octave 2' IV Mixture 1-1/3'     GREAT -- with six ranks and six stops Bourdon 16' Principal 8' Bourdon 8' (ext.) Octave 4' Super Octave 2' (Mxt.) III Mixture 2'     SWELL (encl.) Gedeckt 8' Recorder 4' Nasard 2-2/3' Piccolo 2' Tierce 1-3/5' Trumpet 8' Tremulant     PEDAL Resultant 32' (Gt. Bdn.) Sub Bass 16' Bourdon 16' (Gt.) Sub Bass 8' (ext.) Trumpet 16' (ext. Sw.)     Regards, Tom Jones  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4925359460293845734 - 113/285/054 From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 10:45:56 EST   Please expend the energy to put a subject heading on your posts, folks.  
(back) Subject: Re: stop list "competition" From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 10:52:59 EST   Should this not be a well-researched trialogue between the director of =   music, the consultant, and the firm's tonal director?  
(back) Subject: Re: stop list competition From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 11:03:27 -0500   Well, actually he said there _is_ plenty of room for larger scales on the existing chests, but otherwise amen... though he claims that voicers are telling him no. (??)   There is another question we also need to know... why the half length trumpet bass? Is it because of swell box height? This is important = because it affects what other stops can be placed in the swellbox as well. Considering what you are trying to do (get a big sound) I think it would = be useful to have a second open diapason in the swell, but if its a 5-foot = tall box, the basses won't fit. Though you could fill the basses with bourdons =   or haskell pipes (but haskell pipes are _really_ fat... I doubt they'd = fit. Probably need to build an offset chest for those, which still could be possible within budget probably, but finding room would be tricky to impossible.   The existing stoplist does not sound too bad. It would be hard to improve =   upon. Get the voicing and scaling for the existing stoplist and you'd be pretty well off.   Clearly the Great needs to have as big a principal chorus as possible. 8,4,2 at least of course. Right now it looks like the 2' is more "fluty" = so a real diapason here could help. Now, considering the organ's biggest problem is leading a lot of singers in a lot of room, i'm not sure a = mixture is so necessary. Mixtures are not really very useful for leading hymns... = I very rarely use them. Sometimes i do it to get that silvery sound that everyone likes, but only if the hymn is _very_ familiar, because you lose some clarity with the mixture on... its harder to tell which voice is = what. (I know mixtures have a reputation for increasing clarity... I don't know how they got it. They add sheen, brilliance, and all sorts of wonderful things, but if clarity is what you are after, push that knob back in, thankyou!) The swell probably needs to be designed to be a major contributor to full organ for hymn playing. So it will need a big chorus = of some sort too.   If the room really is so big that revoicing just won't cut it, this is a tricky problem indeed. You'll need some stops that _really_ carry, = without being harsh. Its time to look toward Cavaille-Coll, and maybe even Wurlitzer for advice! Big scales, high pressures, rich voicing.   I hesitate to draw a specific stoplist, but I'm throwing one up anyway. = If you could find space for them, an 8' Open Diapason in the swell could = help, maybe a harmonic flute somewhere (an 8' and a 4' would be great, but holy cow these things gobble up space in a hurry). Perhaps a 4' Clarion in addition to this 8' trumpet. A 16' stop somewhere could help.   Hmmm... I'll be bold:   Great: 16' Bourdon or Diapason 8' Open Diapason 8' Bourdon 4' Octave 2' Superoctave Mixture or Twelfth (I'd vote for the twelfth) (Cavaille-Coll cetainly wouldn't have a mixture on an organ this small)   Swell:   8' Geigen Diapason 8' Harmonic Flute or at least a melodia 4' Principal (violin diapason or whatever) 4' Harmonic Flute 2' Something (or how about a 4' Clarion?) 8' Trumpet   The only problem is, I'd be very surprised if you have room for that stuff =   in the swell box. The other problem is, you still have to do these = weddings and funerals somehow, and there's nothing soft on the Great to accompany soft stops on the swell with a closed box. So we'll probably have to lose =   that mixture or mutation for an 8' Dulciana or something. The = alternative, possibly a good one, would be to voice the great bourdon fairly softly to serve this purpose. But then you'd have quite a gap between the soft = flute and the loud 8' diapason. Some might also say that a big diapason cornet = is necessary to carry a melody line in hymn playing. I don't think it would work because there'd be nothing to accompany it with.   There's no perfect solution, but I'll submit this as further brainstorming =   material. A fun problem to have... how to spend $150,000 to improve a = small organ. I play a 9-rank mongrel and oh, if I could have $150,000 what I could turn it into! Still something small, of course (perhaps still only = 9, 10, or 11 voices) but much more musical. I have several ideas on paper!   Andy     On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 07:55:08 EST, RMB10 wrote > Regarding this little organ in the school chapel, I am still = confused... > If there is no room for larger scales on the manual chests, and the > chests can't be replaced, why does the school want to replace the > pipework? Why don't they just hire a voicer to come in and do > major tonal refinishing? If the pipework is decent, a skilled > voicer can do some amazing things. Also, I understood that no more > stopknobs could be added to the console, but somewhere along the > line in this thread, I thought I read that they would consider > adding some digital pedal stops. That would require the addition > of extra stopknobs. I suggest that they go back to the original > builder of the instrument and get a quote for a revoicing for the > new room, and then talk to a couple of other tonal finishers. I'm > sure it could be done for less that $150,000. The only thing I > would replace would be the 1/2 length Trumpet--I can't stand 1/2 > length chorus reeds. That stop could be mitered couldn't it? Talk > to a builder and voicer, you'll be better off for it. > > Anyway, those are my thoughts. > > Monty Bennett >   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: stop list "competition" From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 11:05:14 -0500   Amen to this too. I do hope our responses are being used as brainstorming =   material only. Andy   On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 10:52:59 EST, TubaMagna wrote > Should this not be a well-researched trialogue between the > director of music, the consultant, and the firm's tonal director? >     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: "stop list competition": serious questions From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 11:05:48 EST     I wonder how focused these people are.   If they are resorting to the collected opinions of organ enthusiasts = on the internet, I question how much research they have done now or in the = past.   Is the pipework truly unsalvageable? Did somebody who specializes in the scaling, voicing, and finishing of =   organ pipework tell them that based upon the base scales, halving ratios, alloys, metal thicknesses, mouth widths, cutups, languid bevels, languid thicknesses, voicing parameters, toe hole sizes, and windpressures, they = found the pipework to be beyond tonal redemption? What WERE these failed past efforts, who made them, and how were they documented? Since you are the owner of the firm that has been awarded this = contract, what are YOUR thoughts?   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: stop list competition From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 11:11:08 -0500   Yours is probably a more practical approach than mine because your swell division will actually fit in the existing swell box. However, you did cheat by having an extension and a mixture borrow, and borrowing stops in the pedal. That is against the rules in this case. The chests are being reused (theoretically) and are entirely straight. No borrows or = extensions are possible. But slight modifications to your specification would fix = this and still be very practical.   On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 10:28:19 -0500, Tom Jones wrote > GREAT -- with six stops, as specified, but nine ranks: > Bourdon 16' > Principal 8' > Chimney Flute 8' > Octave 4' > Super Octave 2' > IV Mixture 1-1/3' > > GREAT -- with six ranks and six stops > Bourdon 16' > Principal 8' > Bourdon 8' (ext.) > Octave 4' > Super Octave 2' (Mxt.) > III Mixture 2' > > SWELL (encl.) > Gedeckt 8' > Recorder 4' > Nasard 2-2/3' > Piccolo 2' > Tierce 1-3/5' > Trumpet 8' > Tremulant > > PEDAL > Resultant 32' (Gt. Bdn.) > Sub Bass 16' > Bourdon 16' (Gt.) > Sub Bass 8' (ext.) > Trumpet 16' (ext. Sw.) > > Regards, > Tom Jones >     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: RE: stop list competition From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 16:30:05 -0000   With all your comments Andy, you seem to be working your way round to something like my original suggestion for this problem. We have many = more organs of this kind of size here in the UK, and my suggestion was a more = or less average UK organ of this size. Could you give your professional = opinion on my spec? I'd be very interested.   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Andy Lawrence Sent: 26 November 2004 16:03 To: PipeChat Subject: Re: stop list competition   Well, actually he said there _is_ plenty of room for larger scales on = the=20 existing chests, but otherwise amen... though he claims that voicers are =   telling him no. (??)   There is another question we also need to know... why the half length=20 trumpet bass? Is it because of swell box height? This is important = because   it affects what other stops can be placed in the swellbox as well. =20 Considering what you are trying to do (get a big sound) I think it would = be=20 useful to have a second open diapason in the swell, but if its a 5-foot = tall   box, the basses won't fit. Though you could fill the basses with = bourdons=20 or haskell pipes (but haskell pipes are _really_ fat... I doubt they'd = fit.   Probably need to build an offset chest for those, which still could be=20 possible within budget probably, but finding room would be tricky to=20 impossible.   The existing stoplist does not sound too bad. It would be hard to = improve=20 upon. Get the voicing and scaling for the existing stoplist and you'd = be=20 pretty well off.   Clearly the Great needs to have as big a principal chorus as possible. =20 8,4,2 at least of course. Right now it looks like the 2' is more = "fluty" so   a real diapason here could help. Now, considering the organ's biggest=20 problem is leading a lot of singers in a lot of room, i'm not sure a = mixture   is so necessary. Mixtures are not really very useful for leading = hymns... I   very rarely use them. Sometimes i do it to get that silvery sound that=20 everyone likes, but only if the hymn is _very_ familiar, because you = lose=20 some clarity with the mixture on... its harder to tell which voice is = what.   (I know mixtures have a reputation for increasing clarity... I don't = know=20 how they got it. They add sheen, brilliance, and all sorts of wonderful =   things, but if clarity is what you are after, push that knob back in,=20 thankyou!) The swell probably needs to be designed to be a major=20 contributor to full organ for hymn playing. So it will need a big = chorus of   some sort too.   If the room really is so big that revoicing just won't cut it, this is a =   tricky problem indeed. You'll need some stops that _really_ carry, = without=20 being harsh. Its time to look toward Cavaille-Coll, and maybe even=20 Wurlitzer for advice! Big scales, high pressures, rich voicing.=20   I hesitate to draw a specific stoplist, but I'm throwing one up anyway. = If=20 you could find space for them, an 8' Open Diapason in the swell could = help,=20 maybe a harmonic flute somewhere (an 8' and a 4' would be great, but = holy=20 cow these things gobble up space in a hurry). Perhaps a 4' Clarion in=20 addition to this 8' trumpet. A 16' stop somewhere could help.   Hmmm... I'll be bold:   Great: 16' Bourdon or Diapason 8' Open Diapason 8' Bourdon 4' Octave 2' Superoctave Mixture or Twelfth (I'd vote for the twelfth) (Cavaille-Coll cetainly=20 wouldn't have a mixture on an organ this small)   Swell:   8' Geigen Diapason 8' Harmonic Flute or at least a melodia 4' Principal (violin diapason or whatever) 4' Harmonic Flute 2' Something (or how about a 4' Clarion?) 8' Trumpet   The only problem is, I'd be very surprised if you have room for that = stuff=20 in the swell box. The other problem is, you still have to do these = weddings   and funerals somehow, and there's nothing soft on the Great to accompany =   soft stops on the swell with a closed box. So we'll probably have to = lose=20 that mixture or mutation for an 8' Dulciana or something. The = alternative,=20 possibly a good one, would be to voice the great bourdon fairly softly = to=20 serve this purpose. But then you'd have quite a gap between the soft = flute=20 and the loud 8' diapason. Some might also say that a big diapason = cornet is   necessary to carry a melody line in hymn playing. I don't think it = would=20 work because there'd be nothing to accompany it with.   There's no perfect solution, but I'll submit this as further = brainstorming=20 material. A fun problem to have... how to spend $150,000 to improve a = small   organ. I play a 9-rank mongrel and oh, if I could have $150,000 what I=20 could turn it into! Still something small, of course (perhaps still = only 9,   10, or 11 voices) but much more musical. I have several ideas on paper!   Andy     On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 07:55:08 EST, RMB10 wrote > Regarding this little organ in the school chapel, I am still = confused... > If there is no room for larger scales on the manual chests, and the=20 > chests can't be replaced, why does the school want to replace the=20 > pipework? Why don't they just hire a voicer to come in and do=20 > major tonal refinishing? If the pipework is decent, a skilled=20 > voicer can do some amazing things. Also, I understood that no more=20 > stopknobs could be added to the console, but somewhere along the=20 > line in this thread, I thought I read that they would consider=20 > adding some digital pedal stops. That would require the addition =20 > of extra stopknobs. I suggest that they go back to the original=20 > builder of the instrument and get a quote for a revoicing for the=20 > new room, and then talk to a couple of other tonal finishers. I'm=20 > sure it could be done for less that $150,000. The only thing I=20 > would replace would be the 1/2 length Trumpet--I can't stand 1/2=20 > length chorus reeds. That stop could be mitered couldn't it? Talk=20 > to a builder and voicer, you'll be better off for it. > =20 > Anyway, those are my thoughts. =20 > =20 > Monty Bennett >=20   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: stop-list competition From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 08:46:20 -0800   I have a question: would it not be wise to have a church acoustician look at the ROOM first, before doing ANYTHING to the organ? It's somewhat harder to correct acoustical defects in an existing building, but removing carpets, pew cushions, etc. and spraying every flat surface with epoxy-resin paint or silicon (depending on whether the walls and ceiling are plaster, wall-board, stone, or wood) is relatively inexpensive in comparison to rebuilding the organ, which may be only suffering from poor acoustics.   Ours was new construction; on the advice of "Red" Wetherill of Shane, Milsom, Wilke, Paoletti and Associates we added triple drywall to the walls and ceiling, with the panels staggered so that the seams didn't come at the same place, and screwed together, rather than nailed, for additional rigidity. Then everything was sprayed with three coats of epoxy-resin paint.   The end result was spectacular ... even re-using the padded and upholstered pews from the old church (which we couldn't afford to replace), we got a room seating only 150 to yield almost three seconds of AUDIBLE reverb. The total added cost ... consultation, additional construction, and painting ... was about $10K.   Another point: is the rail of the choir and organ loft solid, or is it an open banister? That was one thing I'd overlooked that Mr. Wetherill pointed out. Solid rails are sound-catchers.   If the entire room can't be stripped of carpet, etc. and painted, can you at least do the choir and organ loft?   It strikes me that the existing stop-list does NOT look like the kind of tonal design that would be amenable to raising the wind-pressure without becoming harsh, but that's just a guess, since I haven't heard it.   If, as you say, there's room on the chests to enlarge the scales of the pipes by a couple of notes, that in and of itself (with some judicious revoicing) could go a long way toward solving the problems. Even if pipes require extensive work (organ-builders, help me out here), isn't that still 1/2 - 3/4 the cost of new pipework, depending on the amount of work required? I have seen some REAL bow-wows sent to Schopp's or Stinkens and returned as good, solid pipework.   It seems to me that setting a budget before one has determined what is necessary to correct the deficiencies in the organ AND the room is putting the cart before the horse, if the authorities are serious about doing it RIGHT.   Just my $.02 cents' worth.   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: stop list competition From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 11:48:17 -0500 (Eastern Standard Time)   Hi List,=0D =0D Watching from the sidelines I'd say that this organ wants a nice Austi= n=20 Boathorn" Diapason chorus from the 20's. Nothing encourages singing like nice 8' and 16' tone! (C:=0D =0D - Nate=0D =0D Great Organ=0D =0D 8' First Diapason (40)=0D 8' Second Diapason (43)=0D 8' Melodia=0D 8' Gemshorn=0D 4' Octave=0D 4' Wald Flute=0D =0D Swell Organ=0D =0D 8' Geigen Diapason=0D 8' Gedeckt (Fat)=0D 8' Salicional (Pea Shooter Scale)=0D 8' Voix Celeste=0D 4' Octave=0D 8' Cornopean (Bright)=0D =0D Pedal Organ=0D =0D 16' Bourdon=0D 8' Principal=0D 8' Flute=0D 4' Choral Bass=0D =0D Too bad there's no room for a Swell 16' Lieblich!
(back) Subject: Unsolicited tidbit From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 12:22:37 -0500   The name George Whitefield, (1714-1770), famous British revivalist, rings = a bell. He is buried beneath the altar at Old South Presbyterian Church, Federal St., Newburyport MA. He died of pneumonia while there (probably after speaking to 5000 people from the steps of the church in the winter - my comment) on his fifth voyage to the states. His ghost is said to inhabit the sanctuary. There is a monument dedicated to his memory in the left front of the church, and his photo appears in the narthex. = Organ-wise - there is a lovely 1866 E&GG Hook in the gallery, Opus 366, 2 manuals, 23 rank tracker restored by Andover Organ Co. in 1975. The organ remains cone-tuned and "a bit sharp", and has a "thunder pedal" made up of 2 extra pipes (A sharp and B below low C) of the Double Open Diapason 16'. The church also has a "famous whispering gallery". Built in 1756, the church once boasted of having a "sea captain in every pew". The first two pipe organs were installed in 1828, and then in 1838, both of Joseph Alley construction. The church was founded as a direct result of George Whitefield's preaching. His "Great Awakening" preaching campaign started in the states in the 1740's. Taken from my notes when conducting an organ crawl there in 1991. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: Colin & Composers From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 12:59:23 EST     Colin wrote:   "Then there are the "organist/composers" that we keep to ourselves...... Tournemire, Durufle, Dupre, Buxtehude etc etc."   As some of our Lutheran colleagues can certianly attest, Buxtehude wrote = more than just fine organ works--he wrote a good number of cantatas as well, = many of which are quite fine and very usable. Therefore, not kept "to = ourselves" as exclusively (or nearly exclusively) a composer for organ.   Among organist-composers who also produced sacred choral music of quality, =   let us not neglect Langlais (whom I consider solidly first-rate in his = genre).   On a lighter note, this discussion about "top-tier" composers got me to thinking: I myself pursued composition as my primary subject in college = and beyond. The men I studied with were second-tier composers who studied with = first-tier composers-- except for one who was a Soviet composer and was therefore, according to Marxist principles, a no-tier composer. Does that make me a third-tier composer?   Snickering my way back to the organ loft,   Bill H. Boston            
(back) Subject: Re: Disney Hall Organ on CNN From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 10:18:24 -0800 (PST)   Is this masterpiece of an organ perhaps the one that will renew zeal for = the organ among the greater listening population? Bravo CNN       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone.
(back) Subject: RE: stop list competition From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 10:58:57 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   For no other reason that I play a very effective instrument which is actually smaller than 6 stops per division mentioned, and also due to the fact that I know an organ about this size which is a wonderful acompaniment instrument, I thought I would weigh in with something I normally never bother about.....a stoplist which would, hopefully, sit on exisiting slider windchests.   To me, the most important consideration is the acoustic, and by the sounds of it, this is not very lively......so forget Schnitger Mixtures!   One of the finest exponents of the small organ was Fr Willis, and even in quite large instruments of around 50 stops, he seldom supplied bright Mixtures. Even large cathedral organs often had no more than two or three tierce Mixtures at 17.19.22., but never sounded in the least bit dull.   I suppose the trick is to get maximum variety, yet a cohesive sound where all stops blend, because it is important to make full use of what IS available.     Swell   Holzflute 8ft Principal 4 Fifteenth 2 Recorder 2 Sesquialtera 2 rks (12.17.) Trumpet 8       Great     Diapason 8 Rohrflute 8 Koppel Flute 4 Octave 4 Mixture (15.19.22) III   Dulzian 16     Pedal     Bourdon 16 Violoncello 8 Flute 4   Sw - Gt Sw - Ped Gt - Ped     The inclusion of a 16ft reed on the Great may seem odd, but my thinking is that it would fulfil three roles. At the octave higher, it could serve as a solo register seperate from the Swell, when coupled to the full Swell, it could produce an accompaniment reed/flue sound and, as a 16ft Great stop, it would add gravity and colour without weight.   With a seperate unit chest for the 16ft reed, it would be possible to have another stop on the slider chest, but I have stuck to the idea of 12 independent manual registers.   In a less than lively acoustic, the combination of 2ft Fifteenth and the 2 rank Sesqiultera would produce a bright enough sound, with the tierce rank acting as a tonal "binder"....an old English/William Hill trick.   With adequate scaling and fairly robust voicing, I believe such an instrument would fulfil far more than the limited stop-list might suggest. Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - You care about security. So do we. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: Disney Hall Organ on CNN From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 26 Nov 2004 11:01:21 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Possibly Desiree!   More likely, it will make organists want to watch cartoons or at least buy a new pair of spactacles!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> wrote:   > Is this masterpiece of an organ perhaps the one that > will renew zeal for the organ among the greater > listening population?       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! - Get yours free! http://my.yahoo.com