PipeChat Digest #4809 - Friday, October 8, 2004
 
Re: how about reedless reeds?
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: why I took offense--off topic
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: ON-TOPIC: a cautionary tale
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: how about reedless reeds? - now estey chests
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: ON-TOPIC: a cautionary tale
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re: Apologies...Re: Patience...
  by <Tspiggle@aol.com>
Re: Apologies...Re: Patience...
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: how about reedless reeds? - now estey chests
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
HEAR YE...HEAR YE!!  (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: how about reedless reeds? From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 17:12:23 -0500   Thanks Phil! I understand... i don't have time either. Well, suffice it = to say that the info does exist somewhere for those interested.   By the way, I'm all for saving Estey organs, too. I tried to do it at = Faith United Methodist, where the rank in question came from (the organ that was =   originally built for the Burlington VT Masonic Temple) but the church was already solidly decided on the Allen. They wanted to keep the case, and removing the organ without moving the case would have been an undertaking = of Biblical proportions compared to what I could hope to get for a caseless Estey. However, I took the (remote) console (they let me have it to get = it out of their way) so I could disect it and get an idea of what it takes to =   restore one, since it seems to me that Estey's most often get thrown away because the TP action in the console scares people. I would like to be = able to say "yeah, I can restore those, it will cost X". Instead of the usual, "Oh, gosh, you dont' even want to think about that! It'll be a zillion dollars! Maybe a Jillion!" Although the flower-pot chests scare people too. Eventually I'll get ahold of one of those and find out if = they are really so scary.   On the other hand, talk to me (maybe offlist) about the two you know = about. If free, maybe a home could be found. I think they'd have to be free to remotely worthwhile to anyone though, after moving costs and all that = (even with volunteers, which is the only way to do it!)   Andy     > I don't have a lot of information about the construction of > Haskell's labial "reedless" reeds. I would love to have a page on my > website listing and displaying scans of ALL of Haskell's patents. > If someone has those, I'd appreciate copies. Or, if anyone can give > me the patent numbers, I can download scans from the US Patent > Office. (So much information, and so few hours...sigh!) > > Incidentally, I've added a page to the website regarding "recycled" Estey's. > It's such a shame if some of these instruments go to the dump, or are > chopped up for parts, when they could easily go to a small church, with > limited funds, that could really use a real pipe organ. I know of > one or two right now. Anybody near VT got a big barn? lol > > Phil > The Estey Pipe Organ > www.esteyorgan.com >       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: why I took offense--off topic From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 18:17:32 EDT   >Not sure how old you are, your out of college, and have moved away, >which puts you probably no less than 30; being a denizen of alist >devoted to pipe organs makes it likely that you've had several >celebrations of your 30th birthday anniversary, too, even if you haven't =   >started keeping track of the number of times you've celbrated your >39th. I'm 34. >My point: I suspect if your mother were in California today, >trying to do what she did then, she might have a much harder time of it. I don't know about that. Because of adequate financial preparation, my = mom didn't have to work. She CHOSE to go back to work when I was in high = school. I am THANKFUL for a mother who was home when I was a child--she was = there to make sure I practiced, did my home work, bake cookies, etc.--you know, = all those motherly things that drive kids batty! She still can drive me nuts =   from 3,000 miles away. LOL Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: ON-TOPIC: a cautionary tale From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 18:44:26 EDT   In a message dated 10/7/2004 4:36:09 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes:   > would say all of this is ON-TOPIC, as it points out the dangers of > choosing a career in church music. >   Laughing off of my chair...........i just took a 3/4 time job at an UMC in =   florida keeping for the time being my real job. oops, that involved the = organ too.   oh welllllllllll   dale in Florida  
(back) Subject: Re: how about reedless reeds? - now estey chests From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 19:29:33 EDT   In a message dated 10/7/2004 6:19:17 PM Eastern Daylight Time, andy@ablorgans.com writes: Although the flower-pot chests scare people too. Eventually I'll get ahold of one of those and find out if = they are really so scary. I am not sure what (exactly) you meant by 'flower pot chests", but the standard estey chests with outboard primaries and book pneumatics have a = reputation as being hard to restore. I have worked on releathering pneumatics from = estey chests here in my area, and they are more work than laying a round pouch, = but they are NOT that difficult to re-cover. you DO need to use very thin = leather, tho as estey often covered these book pneumatics in Zephyr skin which = allowed for very rapid operation. One thing that is VERY important is to retain = the bottom-board venting, as the pneumatics become leaky as they age (after 15 = - 20 years in particular) and if enough of them start to leak, they can = partially pressurize a fully sealed chest compartment, so that venting them to atmosphere becomes an important feature when any given stop is not = playing. a partly pressurized chest will drive you NUTZZ trying to tune with pipes weeping = on stops other than the one being tuned.   Most people prefer to convert these chests to electro-mechanical because = that is less labor intensive than recovering several hundred estey book = pneumatics (plus you ought to re-gasket the pneumatics where they fasten to the note action channel baords and replace the pallet leather on the hinged portion = of the pneumatic.). of course THEN you need a relay, etc, but the flip side is = that pedal borrows are now practical with unit actions.   Most of the Estey organs that I have services in this area were decidedly lacking in Pedal stops...usually a sole Bourdon plus the SW and GT to PED couplers.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Re: ON-TOPIC: a cautionary tale From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 19:45:49 -0400   Dear Bud, You said it for the many but there are the few, like rock musicians that did make it. God bless all of them, the ones who made their fortune = and those who didn't. I, for one, chose, after seeing what church musicians made, decided that no matter how enticing a church pipe organ was, the adulation from the pews or the so called title, I was to pragmatic to stay in the field at the age of 19. I joked to my music prof last year at Moravian when I took my first lesson with her that the last time I sat on = an organ bench for a lesson was April of 1961. That was when I made the decision to leave the formal study of organ for engineering. I played in bars on a Hammond to support myself and pay the tuition for school and = then in the Air Force, played in the Officer Club at union scale (wow) and doubled my salary as a Second Lieutenant. I am now back to playing organ = for myself and some other friends similarly interested, retired from working = and have enough income coming in to support myself. Thank God. Paul PS. Despite my 63 years, I'm surprisingly in decent shape, work out at the gym, get the heart rate up to 135 and work the Cybex machines to keep what = I have left. LOL         ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, October 07, 2004 4:38 PM Subject: ON-TOPIC: a cautionary tale     > I would say all of this is ON-TOPIC, as it points out the dangers of > choosing a career in church music. > > Bud > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >     --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.752 / Virus Database: 503 - Release Date: 9/3/2004    
(back) Subject: Re: Apologies...Re: Patience... From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 21:15:04 EDT   Damn, I hate when somebody apologizes. It means I have to go to my deleted =   mail file and sort through all that stuff to find out the e-mail they're referring to so I can see what they're apologizing for!   Tom  
(back) Subject: Re: Apologies...Re: Patience... From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 07 Oct 2004 21:32:13 -0400   Yes Tom, but at least you know that if we are apologizing and having patience, the community is staying closer to traditional family values and Christian conduct, something we can all rejoice and be glad for. It gladdens my heart to see that our interaction is composed not only of razor sharp angularity and rigidly straight lines, but there are also some soft curves and gently rounded reversals that suggests there may be hope for all of us. Praise Be. Kindness has a chance. Mike Gettelman     Tspiggle@aol.com wrote:   > Damn, I hate when somebody apologizes. It means I have to go to my > deleted mail file and sort through all that stuff to find out the > e-mail they're referring to so I can see what they're apologizing for! > > Tom      
(back) Subject: Re: how about reedless reeds? - now estey chests From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 22:50:50 -0500   Interesting. This bottom board venting thing might explain a bit of what was going on with the Estey in question, which I never did have a chance = to look at very closely.   By flower pot, I only meant the way that the chests are divided by stop, = so that you can see daylight through the chest between each stop. To me it looked like window flower pots lined up. Never got close enough to notice =   more than that about it. Weird. Estey never did anything normal, that's for sure! Sort of like Austin, in that regard. Just _couldn't_ do things =   the way everyone else did! :) For better or worse. But (unlike Austin, one could argue) everything Estey made seemed to be really hard to work = on. I've got a 10-rank 2 man and pedal reed organ and yikes!   Andy     I am not sure what (exactly) you meant > by 'flower pot chests", but the standard estey chests with outboard > primaries and book pneumatics have a reputation as being hard to > restore. I have worked on releathering pneumatics from estey chests > here in my area, and they are more work than laying a round pouch, > but they are NOT that difficult to re-cover. you DO need to use very > thin leather, tho as estey often covered these book pneumatics in > Zephyr skin which allowed for very rapid operation. One thing that > is VERY important is to retain the bottom-board venting, as the > pneumatics become leaky as they age (after 15 - 20 years in > particular) and if enough of them start to leak, they can partially > pressurize a fully sealed chest compartment, so that venting them to > atmosphere becomes an important feature when any given stop is not > playing. a partly pressurized chest will drive you NUTZZ trying to > tune with pipes weeping on stops other than the one being tuned. > > Most people prefer to convert these chests to electro-mechanical > because that is less labor intensive than recovering several hundred > estey book pneumatics > (plus you ought to re-gasket the pneumatics where they fasten to the > note action channel baords and replace the pallet leather on the > hinged portion of the pneumatic.). of course THEN you need a relay, > etc, but the flip side is that pedal borrows are now practical with > unit actions.     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: HEAR YE...HEAR YE!! (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 23:57:06 EDT   Thursday, 7 October 2004 The Feast of Our Lady, Queen of the Most Holy Rosary   Dear colleagues and friends,   I write you this evening with good and with a very pleased look toward the =   future following the 50th Anniversary Banquet of the founding of our = Parish. The announcement was made with a smile by the Pastor and with the Bishop = sitting to his immediate left.   As many of you know, for many months now Holy Rosary has been = investigating a new organ for our church with the hopes of it being a pipe organ. The = cost of a new pipe organ has been the one overriding governing factor that have = led to many months of frustration, anger, and despair at the thought of us not =   being able to attain that goal or installing a digital instrument as a "consolation prize" to a pipe organ. We started with designs at around = 45-47 ranks and $700,000 and then worked down in both size and price and, even with bids = from many builders, were never able to get below $450,000 for even a very = modest three manual instrument.   In addition to a new pipe organ, options also included a digital = instrument or a rebuilt vintage instrument. Through timing and contacts of our = parish's quest for a new organ, however, the latter has come to pass.   We were notified of a good-sized Moller organ which will need a new home beginning in February 2006. The price is better than "right" for us, and = it will fit into our space with a bit of reengineering. The overall price of reconditioning, retrofitting with Solid State, installation and final = revoicing will come in at $250,000 including the purchase of the instrument, and will be carried out by the former Moller rep here in Memphis who, ironically, = originally installed the organ in Michigan when it was new. I know the instrument = well and have played it many times as it was two miles from my own church in = Detroit. It is currently in daily service there and is being sold to make room for = a new Schoenstein which is being donated to their church. While it is will = not necessarily be a newly built English/Neo-Victorian/Symphonic organ = originally conceived in design and tonality for Holy Rosary I know that, after = revoicing and in our acoustic, it will make a very fine instrument to lead our = worship and play Liturgy and the repertoire.   In all honesty, and after exhausting every possible chance for a new instrument of a decent and flexible size, we just cannot even think of a = new instrument with costs where they are, so we feel that the best thing to do = is to give a vintage instrument that could possibly be discarded a new life of service. = Quite frankly, that is a very good feeling.   Our committee spoke with and viewed proposals from a select list of = several of the finest pipe organ builders today, all of whom are building world = class instruments and provided us with some incredibly insightful and musical = options for a new instrument in our church. Again, however, the cost of a new = organ prohibited us from moving in that direction.   As a musician, I would not have been happy for a small and inflexible instrument, nor would such have really served our parish and its growing = music programs as a proper organ would.   Thank you for reading, and your well wishes and prayers for the success of =   this project will be much appreciated. It is an incredibly good feeling = to say that a Roman Catholic Church in the Diocese of Memphis in 2004 is putting = in pipes!   More information to follow.   Scott F. Foppiano Organist and Director of Parish Music Holy Rosary Church, Memphis, TN   Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.