PipeChat Digest #4813 - Sunday, October 10, 2004
 
Pisgah
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Lake Placid Silent Movie Festival!
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Concert Announcement in Columbus, Ohio (x posted)
  by "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net>
Re: RE: Organs at closed Boston Parishes
  by "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org>
toe studs
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: toe studs
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Introduction, Jerry Richer!
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Re: toe studs
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Estey Organs
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Estey Organs
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Estey Organs
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: toe studs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
 

(back) Subject: Pisgah From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 08:08:10 -0500   I've always loved this hymn tune, and am eternally grateful to my friend for introducing me to Dale Wood's arrangement. We Baptists always sang the text "When I can read my title clear", a real property attorney's dream.   However, in quickly scanning the internet (and I mean quickly) I did not find other texts to the tune. Do any of you sing the tune to different words?   Just curious.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Lake Placid Silent Movie Festival! From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 11:08:26 -0400   The Lake Placid New York Palace Theatre was built in 1926. It still houses it's original 3/7 Robert Morton organ which was rebuilt under the direct supervision of Nelson Page of the American Theatre Organ Society in 1998. I played this instrument in 1971 or so or rather I turned it on and = it made some sounds. Lake Placid had another interesting instrument at the Lake Placid = Club. I played that one around the same time and it was in bad repair then. Several of the pipes were still visible in the chapel in 1985 or so but I suppose it's all gone now. Does anyone know?   OCTOBER SILENT FILM FESTIVAL Thursdays in October. Film starts at 7:30pm at the Palace Theatre. Tickets $10.   October 7: MARK OF ZORRO October 14: YANKEE CLIPPER October 21: PHANTOM OF THE OPERA October 28: SPARTACUS   Jerry Tupper Lake, New York   Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Bat Arhonious Software, = www.chirpingbat.com    
(back) Subject: Concert Announcement in Columbus, Ohio (x posted) From: "Mike Gettelman" <mike3247@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 12:46:24 -0400   Greetings to All, For those who have been following the epic reconstruction of the Kimball Organ at First Congregational Church in Columbus Ohio through the generous efforts of list member Stan Krider to keep us updated and informed about the progress, I would like to to shout out a reminder that it is complete, and that in one week from now, on October 17, 2004 at 4pm, You and I will have the distinct pleasure to hear none other than Thomas Murray play a recital upon this special instrument should You chose to attend. I say "shout" because I want to be sure there are no posts on this list following this recital claiming "why didn't you tell me". I think those who can make the trip will find their effort well worth the travel, and Stan has suggested we come as early as possible because this concert promises to fill the church to the rafters. I had the distinct pleasure to hear Felix Hell perform a recital on the beautiful Von Beckerath organ that served this congregation from the rear gallery during the period the Kimball was getting its rebuild. The acoustic is reasonable if not generous, and I imagine the Kimball will fill this space with a glorious sound particularly at the masterful hand of Tom Murray whom I know is able to draw the most from an instrument like this. I had the chance to hear Tom play the great Skinner Organ at Severance Hall in Cleveland some years ago, so I know the combination of his skill and the Kimball will be a double treat. First Congregational Church of Columbus is located at 444 E. Broad St. at the corner of 9th. St. just West of the Broad St. Exit off I-71 in downtown Columbus and is easy to find. Check out their web site at: http://www.first-church.org/ for more details about the church. This promises to be a wonderful and special event that all who are able should try to attend. If you see me there, stop by a say hello. I'm the good looking one with a full head of blond hair who is filling out my powder blue sports coat with notable substantiality. (grin) Cheers Mike Gettelman  
(back) Subject: Re: RE: Organs at closed Boston Parishes From: "TommyLee Whitlock" <tommylee@whitlock.org> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 15:44:34 -0400   In Northern Virginia, new RC churches are being _built_ by the Diocese of Arlington. Would only that they recycle some of the grand old instruments =   from the parishes closing down. tommylee   > Closing of RC parishes is nationwide in the USA as we were informed > at the sermon in Little Flower RCC in Hollywood [FL, NOT CA, <G>]. I > find that so sad, and R/catholics are very concerned. To the other > side, when I see the vast diversity of churches here who accept > people from every christian denomination to communion (the RC church > law doesn't allow that) vs. the long distances here and the > population shift in big cities, therein lies a major cause for > that problem. The other major cause is the lack of RC priests. > > As for the organs, it will be necessary to sift out which ones > are worthwile to save (quality - current condition - Historical > interest & value), a tough but worthwile job for OHS and OCH I venture > to think.    
(back) Subject: toe studs From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 15:52:15 EDT   hello, list.   situation: the 1951 moller at my church has 8 generals, and 6 thumb = pistons per division. however, there are no general toe studs. instead the pedal =   pistons are duplicated. i'd like to have them replaced with generals, of = course.   question: is the norm for them to be numbered from right to left, or left = to right? my mind has suddenly left me on this...   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: toe studs From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 16:11:18 EDT     In a message dated 10/10/04 2:52:50 PM, BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes:     > hello, list. >=20 > situation:=A0 the 1951 moller at my church has 8 generals, and 6 thumb pis= tons=20 > per division.=A0 however, there are no general toe studs.=A0 instead the p= edal=20 > pistons are duplicated.=A0 i'd like to have them replaced with generals, o= f=20 > course. >=20 > question:=A0 is the norm for them to be numbered from right to left, or le= ft=20 > to right?=A0 my mind has suddenly left me on this... >=20 > scot >=20   i believe that the standard order is numerically ascending-from Left to=20 Right. On my org at church, 1-6 are on the left and 7-12 are on the right.= =20 gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Introduction, Jerry Richer! From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 16:13:53 -0400   Hello Pipe Chatters:   I should introduce myself. My name is Jerry Richer, age 50. I grew up in Tupper Lake New York. I've worked at Lincoln Labs in Massachusetts and for the Navy in = California as a scientific / Physics computer programmer and operations research analyst. I had a music store in California for 10 years and still sell music and audio production software and hardware. I started piano lessons at the age of 12 but wanted to play the Estey organ in the school auditorium. The last piano teacher I had when I was thirteen told me that I couldn't study the organ until I learned to play = the piano. When I was sixteen I found an organ teacher, George Reynolds who didn't feel that way and I studied organ seriously for three years. At = the time I was lucky to have my lessons on a brand new Holtkamp instrument particularly well suited to Baroque music in Saranac Lake New York. At = home I had an old Teller to practice on in my Catholic church. I started = college at the State University of New York at Potsdam, home of the Crane School = of Music where I took some organ classes and had three practice organs available to me most of the time. I haven't played in years but intend to get back into it. I'd like = to build my own organ and am considering offering my time and whatever skill = I might have at an organ shop. Looking forward to meeting you all.   Jerry   Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Bat Arhonious Software, = www.chirpingbat.com    
(back) Subject: Re: toe studs From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 13:26:36 -0700   I'd LEAVE the pedal toe studs and add general toe studs duplicating the thumb pistons. Aren't the pedal toe studs on the right? General toe studs are usually on the left.   Cheers,   Bud   Gfc234@aol.com wrote:   > > In a message dated 10/10/04 2:52:50 PM, BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes: > > >> hello, list. >> >> situation: the 1951 moller at my church has 8 generals, and 6 thumb >> pistons per division. however, there are no general toe studs. >> instead the pedal pistons are duplicated. i'd like to have them >> replaced with generals, of course. >> >> question: is the norm for them to be numbered from right to left, or >> left to right? my mind has suddenly left me on this... >> >> scot > > > > i believe that the standard order is numerically ascending-from Left to > Right. On my org at church, 1-6 are on the left and 7-12 are on the > right. > gfc > > > > Gregory Ceurvorst > 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS > Evanston, IL 60201 > 847.332.2788 home/fax > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com > gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net      
(back) Subject: Estey Organs From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 15:39:29 -0500   A couple of folk have told me that Esteys were considered a "throw-away" organ....not because they weren't well built (they easily lasted 50 years or more without major attention), but because they were so darn time-consuming to work on when they did begin to need work. I do know you have to take off all sorts of stuff on the bottom (stop action.......etc.)of the chest before you can get to the chest mechanism, then repair whatever needs it, and put it all back together before you can see if your repair worked. I've disassembled an Estey chest, but never to put it back together, so I can't speak first hand.   That is certainly different than, say, Marr & Colton Theatre Organs. I've read that M & C deliberately built very cheap organs counting on getting the replacement installation ten years down the road.   I have a hobby/business of repairing vintage sewing machines (primarily 1940-1970). It's a similar situation.....many of them are certainly worth repair, but in many cases a simple clean, oil, and adjust is actually worth more than the retail value of the machine. Worth it? Depends upon whether or not simple short term economics is the bottom line. I have a Singer 401 sewing machine, made about 1960, one of the finest Singers ever built. It's "worth," on the market, at most, about $100. But it will easily last another hundred years of use with careful maintenance. Say that about any brand new sewing machine you go out and buy for whatever price!   Dennis Steckley   "Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened."--Dr. Seuss        
(back) Subject: Re: Estey Organs From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 13:59:21 -0700       First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois wrote:   > A couple of folk have told me that Esteys were considered a "throw-away" > organ....not because they weren't well built (they easily lasted 50 > years or more without major attention), but because they were so darn > time-consuming to work on when they did begin to need work. I do know > you have to take off all sorts of stuff on the bottom (stop > action.......etc.)of the chest before you can get to the chest > mechanism, then repair whatever needs it, and put it all back together > before you can see if your repair worked. I've disassembled an Estey > chest, but never to put it back together, so I can't speak first hand. >   I remember somebody on here talking about a long "Estey screwdriver" that was needed for some of that.   Here's a question: I know more about the reed organ side of Estey than the pipe organ side. Other than Steinmeyer's brief association with them in an attempt to revive the pipe side, I don't know anything about their tonal directors.   The LITTLE Esteys I've played from the teens were charming ... full-voiced diapasons, handsome flutes ... the Swell salicionals were right on the EDGE of being too keen ... but in general they were a good, workmanlike, pleasing sound.   By contrast, some of their larger 2m and 3m electro-pneumatic organs from the '20s and '30s were the aural equivalent of wearing a rough wool sweater against bare skin ... EVERYTHING grated on the ear, even the Dulcianas.   What happened in the interim? The contrast was QUITE striking. Did Estey build those early T-P organs on slider chests, or did they always use valve or cone chests? Did they change tonal directors? Or were the little organs simply made that way to be "middle-of-the-road" so they'd fit into varied acoustical settings?   I've never heard any of the handful of surviving BIG Esteys ... what are THEY like?   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Estey Organs From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 16:56:20 -0500   What was interesting about the Marr & Colton is that their motto was "Building the World's Finest Organ." James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups (314) 608-4137 WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2004 3:39 PM Subject: Estey Organs     > A couple of folk have told me that Esteys were considered a "throw-away" > organ....not because they weren't well built (they easily lasted 50 > years or more without major attention), but because they were so darn > time-consuming to work on when they did begin to need work. I do know > you have to take off all sorts of stuff on the bottom (stop > action.......etc.)of the chest before you can get to the chest > mechanism, then repair whatever needs it, and put it all back together > before you can see if your repair worked. I've disassembled an Estey > chest, but never to put it back together, so I can't speak first hand. > > That is certainly different than, say, Marr & Colton Theatre Organs. > I've read that M & C deliberately built very cheap organs counting on > getting the replacement installation ten years down the road. > > I have a hobby/business of repairing vintage sewing machines (primarily > 1940-1970). It's a similar situation.....many of them are certainly > worth repair, but in many cases a simple clean, oil, and adjust is > actually worth more than the retail value of the machine. Worth it? > Depends upon whether or not simple short term economics is the bottom > line. I have a Singer 401 sewing machine, made about 1960, one of the > finest Singers ever built. It's "worth," on the market, at most, about > $100. But it will easily last another hundred years of use with careful > maintenance. Say that about any brand new sewing machine you go out and > buy for whatever price! > > Dennis Steckley > > "Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened."--Dr. Seuss > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: toe studs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 17:29:47 -0500   If you didn't mind losing the 6 Pedal toe studs, it would be a very = simple job just to wire them to to the General thumb pistons and make = them into General toe studs that duplicated the thumb pistons. That, of = course, would only give you 6 rather than 8 General toe studs, but if = you have room you could add a couple more toe studs and wire them in = too, in order to have 8 toe studs duplicating all 8 General thumb = pistons. Since the toe studs would only be duplicating the General = thumb pistons it would not require any more equipment to be added to the = combination action, so it would only be a matter of the cost of the = wiring plus the cost of the toe studs themselves. Indeed if there is = room to add more toe studs -- say, along the back of the pedalboard -- = you could add 8 new ones to wire to the General thumb pistons and keep = the old Pedal divisionals. =20   You can number them any way you like, but left to right would be the = most usual.   John Speller ----- Original Message -----=20 From: BlueeyedBear@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Sunday, October 10, 2004 2:52 PM Subject: toe studs     hello, list.   situation: the 1951 moller at my church has 8 generals, and 6 thumb = pistons per division. however, there are no general toe studs. instead = the pedal pistons are duplicated. i'd like to have them replaced with = generals, of course.   question: is the norm for them to be numbered from right to left, or = left to right? my mind has suddenly left me on this...