PipeChat Digest #4814 - Sunday, October 10, 2004
 
Off-topic: Iraq
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Pisgah
  by "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com>
Re: toe studs
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Setting of Psalm 23 Sought [x-posted, marginally on-topic]
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: toe studs
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: toe studs
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Off-Topic: Pride and Priviledge
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Off-topic: Iraq From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 20:15:17 -0400   Perhaps some readers will find this useful. Ed Schroeder was faculty = member at Concordia theological Seminary in St. Louis until in the big "blow-up" = in ca. The '70's. He is a conservative and very sturdy Lutheran theologian. The item below comes through a mailing list maintained by the Crossings Community, a sort of theological think-tank in St. Louis.   No matter what one's opinion may be about some of this, I would call on each of us to pray for our military personnel in harm's way in Iraq. = Having been in the military, I can attest that at least some of them are there against their wishes, having been "drafted" because of their reserve = status.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   ------ Forwarded Message From: Ed and Marie Schroeder <Mehs55@CS.COM> Reply-To: Mehs55@CS.COM Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 17:03:01 EDT To: SABBATHEOLOGY@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM Subject: WSJ reporter: The Real Iraq   Colleagues,   This is an extra. Not numbered in the Sabbataheology or ThursdayTheology sequences. Forwarded to me by Paul Goetting who got it from our common friend Myron Marty. [Like all of us "old Missourians" we're all "almost" = related. E.g., Myron's wife and my wife ataended Lutheran High School in St. Louis together 50-plus years ago.] Vis-a-vis those happy memories this posting = is not so. Ed Schroeder -------------------------------------------------------------------   Subject: Fwd: Eyewitness Account: The Real Iraq     Sometimes I forward things to members of our family and regular correspondents, but rarely beyond that. However, this document deserves a wider readership. No further comment is necessary. But there is a question: = Why are we in this mess and who should be surprised by it? MM     9/30/2004   [Farnaz Fassihi, a Wall Street Journal correspondent in Iraq, confirmed = that a widely-redistributed letter she emailed to friends about the nightmarish situation in Iraq was indeed written by her. Too bad the WSJ doesn't = allow this reporter to write these kinds of stories for the paper.]     Being a foreign correspondent in Baghdad these days is like being under virtual house arrest. Forget about the reasons that lured me to this job: = a chance to see the world, explore the exotic, meet new people in far away lands, discover their ways and tell stories that could make a difference.     Little by little, day-by-day, being based in Iraq has defied all those reasons. I am house bound. I leave when I have a very good reason to and a scheduled interview. I avoid going to people's homes and never walk in the streets. I can't go grocery shopping any more, can't eat in restaurants, can't strike = a conversation with strangers, can't look for stories, can't drive in any thing but a full armored car, can't go to scenes of breaking news stories, can't be stuck in traffic, can't speak English outside, can't take a road trip, = can't say I'm an American, can't linger at checkpoints, can't be curious about what people are saying, doing, feeling. And can't and can't.     There has been one too many close calls, including a car bomb so near our house that it blew out all the windows. So now my most pressing concern every day is not to write a kick-ass story but to stay alive and make sure our = Iraqi employees stay alive. In Baghdad I am a security personnel first, a = reporter second.     It's hard to pinpoint when the turning point exactly began. Was it April when the Fallujah fell out of the grasp of the Americans? Was it when Moqtada and Jish Mahdi declared war on the U.S. military? Was it when Sadr City, home to ten percent of Iraq's population, became a nightly battlefield for the Americans? Or was it when the insurgency began spreading from isolated pockets in the Sunni triangle to include most of Iraq? Despite President Bush's rosy assessments, Iraq remains a disaster. If under Saddam it was a potential threat, under the Americans it has been transformed to imminent and active = threat, a foreign policy failure bound to haunt the United States for decades to = come.     Iraqis like to call this mess the situation. When asked how are things? they reply: the situation is very bad.     What they mean by situation is this: the Iraqi government doesn't control most Iraqi cities, there are several car bombs going off each day around = the country killing and injuring scores of innocent people, the country's = roads are becoming impassable and littered by hundreds of landmines and explosive devices aimed to kill American soldiers, there are assassinations, kidnappings and beheadings. The situation, basically, means a raging barbaric guerilla = war.     In four days, 110 people died and over 300 got injured in Baghdad alone. The numbers are so shocking that the ministry of health, which was attempting = an exercise of public transparency by releasing the numbers-- has now stopped disclosing them.     Insurgents now attack Americans 87 times a day.     A friend drove thru the Shiite slum of Sadr City yesterday. He said = young men were openly placing improvised explosive devices into the ground. = They melt a shallow hole into the asphalt, dig the explosive, cover it with = dirt and put an old tire or plastic can over it to signal to the locals this is booby-trapped. He said on the main roads of Sadr City, there were a dozen landmines per every ten yards. His car snaked and swirled to avoid driving over = them. Behind the walls sits an angry Iraqi ready to detonate them as soon as an American convoy gets near. This is in Shiite land, the population that was supposed to love America for liberating Iraq.     For journalists the significant turning point came with the wave of abduction and kidnappings. Only two weeks ago we felt safe around Baghdad because foreigners were being abducted on the roads and highways between towns. Then came a frantic phone call from a journalist female friend at 11 p.m. telling me two Italian women had been abducted from their homes in broad daylight. = Then the two Americans, who got beheaded this week and the Brit, were abducted from their homes in a residential neighborhood. They were supplying the entire block with round the clock electricity from their generator to win friends. The abductors grabbed one of them at 6 a.m. when he came out to switch on the generator; his beheaded body was thrown back near the neighborhoods. The insurgency, we are told, is rampant with no signs of calming down. If any thing, it is growing stronger, organized and more sophisticated every day. The various elements within it -- baathists, criminals, nationalists and Al Qaeda -- = are cooperating and coordinating.     I went to an emergency meeting for foreign correspondents with the = military and embassy to discuss the kidnappings. We were somberly told our fate = would largely depend on where we were in the kidnapping chain once it was determined we were missing. Here is how it goes: criminal gangs grab you and sell you up to Baathists in Fallujah, who will in turn sell you to Al Qaeda. In turn, cash and weapons flow the other way from Al Qaeda to the Baathisst to the criminals. My friend Georges, the French journalist snatched on the road = to Najaf, has been missing for a month with no word on release or whether he is = still alive.     America's last hope for a quick exit? The Iraqi police and National Guard units we are spending billions of dollars to train. The cops are being murdered by the dozens every day -- over 700 to date -- and the insurgents are infiltrating their ranks. The problem is so serious that the U.S. military has allocated $6 million dollars to buy out 30,000 cops they just trained to = get rid of them quietly.     As for reconstruction: firstly it's so unsafe for foreigners to operate that almost all projects have come to a halt. After two years, of the $18 = billion Congress appropriated for Iraq reconstruction only about $1 billion or so has been spent and a chunk has now been reallocated for improving security, a sign of just how bad things are going here.     Oil dreams? Insurgents disrupt oil flow routinely as a result of = sabotage and oil prices have hit record high of $49 a barrel.     Who did this war exactly benefit? Was it worth it? Are we safer because Saddam is holed up and Al Qaeda is running around in Iraq?   Iraqis say that thanks to America they got freedom in exchange for insecurity. Guess what? They say they'd take security over freedom any = day, even if it means having a dictator ruler.     I heard an educated Iraqi say today that if Saddam Hussein were allowed = to run for elections he would get the majority of the vote.   This is truly sad.     Then I went to see an Iraqi scholar this week to talk to him about elections here. He has been trying to educate the public on the = importance of voting. He said, "President Bush wanted to turn Iraq into a democracy that would = be an example for the Middle East. Forget about democracy, forget about being = a model for the region, we have to salvage Iraq before all is lost."     One could argue that Iraq is already lost beyond salvation. For those of = us on the ground it's hard to imagine what if any thing could salvage it from its violent downward spiral.     The genie of terrorism, chaos and mayhem has been unleashed onto this country as a result of American mistakes and it can't be put back into a bottle.     The Iraqi government is talking about having elections in three months while half of the country remains a no go zone -- out of the hands of the government and the Americans and out of reach of journalists. In the other half, the disenchanted population is too terrified to show up at polling stations. = The Sunnis have already said they'd boycott elections, leaving the stage open for polarized government of Kurds and Shiites that will not be deemed as legitimate and will most certainly lead to civil war.     I asked a 28-year-old engineer if he and his family would participate in the Iraqi elections since it was the first time Iraqis could to some = degree elect a leadership. His response summed it all: "Go and vote and risk = being blown into pieces or followed by the insurgents and murdered for cooperating = with the Americans? For what? To practice democracy? Are you joking?"   ------------------------------------------------------------------------ You can support this e-mail newsletter, and Crossings's other work, by making an online, tax-deductible donation at our website: www.crossings.org. Click the "Donate" button on the main page. Thank you! ------------------------------------------------------------------------ This message was transmitted by the SABBATHEOLOGY mailing list server. SABBATHEOLOGY and its companion piece THURSDAY THEOLOGY come from the Crossings Community of St. Louis, Missouri, USA. 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(back) Subject: Re: Pisgah From: "Mark Koontz" <markkoontz@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 17:54:21 -0700 (PDT)   I took a look through some of my hymnals. I found the following words to Pisgah in "Trinity Hymnal", which also hints at lawyering:   I'm not ashamed to own my Lord, or to defend his cause, maintain the honor of his Word, the glory of his cross.   The words are by Isaac Watts, and there are three other verses.   I've never been in a church that used this hymnal, so I don't know if it's = used to any extent. This setting is in F, and the stanzas are only eight = measures long. Austin C. Lovelace arranged it, and the arrangement is copyright = 1964 Abingdon Press, from their "The Book of Hymns". To me, this instance of = the tune seems only useful, and not particularly "inspired".   The Baptist Hymnal's higher key (A-Flat) and use of repetition, doubling = the length of the tune, make the tune much more emotionally appealing.   In any case, I don't remember ever singing it either way. I was only a = Baptist for a year, and the hymnal they used doesn't have any Pisgah.   Mark Koontz   > Subject: Pisgah > From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> > Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 08:08:10 -0500   > However, in quickly scanning the internet (and I mean quickly) I did not > find other texts to the tune. Do any of you sing the tune to different > words? > > Just curious. > > Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: Re: toe studs From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 21:10:04 EDT   In a message dated 10/10/2004 6:31:27 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jlspeller@swbell.net writes: .. Indeed if there is room to add more toe studs -- say, along the back = of the pedalboard -- you could add 8 new ones to wire to the General thumb = pistons and keep the old Pedal divisionals. one small detail...most MOller consoles would have had the generals = terraced (left of the opening for the swell shoes) and fastened to the knee panel = (as ooposed to the upper rail of the pedalboard). the other consideration is = that finding exact duplicates of the Moller studs (whether they are duckbill = types or the spun brass style) may prove to be a challenge.   As far as wiring in the toe studs in parallel to the thumb pistons, this = is basically a no-brainer for anyone conversant in Moller = consoles...everything goes to the main junction in the rear of the console. you will need = 3-contact type toestuds that make sequentially to fire the Pick magnet first then = operate the big power solenoid OR power book pneumatic (if it's a wind-blown = console.)   Rick in VA Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Setting of Psalm 23 Sought [x-posted, marginally on-topic] From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 18:10:11 -0700   Hello, quite some years ago I worked with a choir who had in their library a nice, fairly simple, contemporary [but melodic and pleasing, not happy-clappy junk] setting of Psalm 23. I do not remember the composer, but I can chord & solfeggio [from memory] the first couple of bars and hope someone can identify it:   [C major, 3rd inversion] Sol Sol Sol Mi La Sol The Lord Is My Shepherd   [A minor, 3nd inversion] Sol Me Re Sol I shall not want   [D minor, 2nd inversion] Mi Mi Mi Re Re He maketh me to   [C major 3rd inv., E bass] Sol Sol La La Lie down in green   [A minor, 4th inv., F bass] Do-8 Mi .... pastures ....   There is a lot more to it than this, obviously, but anyone who has it or has done it should hopefully be able to recognize it from the very plaintive opening measures.   Some of the chords may not be "spot-on" but this is close - haven't heard it in over 20 years --- but now I have a need for this type of setting of the Psalm.   Thx in advance to anyone who can identify composer & publisher - perhaps private emailing would be most appropriate.     ~ C      
(back) Subject: Re: toe studs From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 21:58:54 EDT   In a message dated 10/10/04 1:23:07 PM Pacific Daylight Time, quilisma@cox.net writes:   > I'd LEAVE the pedal toe studs and add general toe studs duplicating the > thumb pistons. Aren't the pedal toe studs on the right? General toe > studs are usually on the left. > > Cheers, > > Bud >   no, that's just it. the toe studs are on the LEFT. on the right are the couplers, GP, SP, CP, and SFZ.   Scot  
(back) Subject: Re: toe studs From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 22:01:52 EDT   In a message dated 10/10/04 6:11:12 PM Pacific Daylight Time, RMaryman@aol.com writes:   > one small detail...most MOller consoles would have had the generals > terraced (left of the opening for the swell shoes) and fastened to the = knee panel > (as ooposed to the upper rail of the pedalboard). the other = consideration is > that finding exact duplicates of the Moller studs (whether they are = duckbill > types or the spun brass style) may prove to be a challenge. > > As far as wiring in the toe studs in parallel to the thumb pistons, this = is > basically a no-brainer for anyone conversant in Moller = consoles...everything > goes to the main junction in the rear of the console. you will need > 3-contact type toestuds that make sequentially to fire the Pick magnet = first then > operate the big power solenoid OR power book pneumatic (if it's a = wind-blown > console.) > >   as far as finding exact duplicates, i couldn't care less if they match or not. the console is original and hidden, so only the organist knows if = they match.   regarding the process of wiring, that's ALL beyond me. (i'm doing good to =   change a tire!) that's something the church would have to write a check = for. (the toe studs, not the tire change.)   scot  
(back) Subject: Off-Topic: Pride and Priviledge From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sun, 10 Oct 2004 22:41:18 EDT   One of the many, many reasons the rest of the world so bitterly hates Americans is their simultaneous idolization and resentment of the same = things. Furthermore, it is the American inability to distinguish between wealth = and class (even if we discount American "cultural" arrogance) that has further =   alienated us from the global community. We worship physical beauty, yet anybody who actually DOES fall into = the category of "visually appealing" is dismissed as self-involved, = egotistical, vapid, and stupid. Entire blocks of television time are devoted to the = excesses of the wealthy, as if this is something to envy, yet there is profound resentment for those of means, especially those who are both wealthy AND sophisticated. The assumption that those who were born into wealth are = somehow lazy or parasitic is often made by those who blame their lack of means on = circumstances not under their control. Class, style, sophistication, intellect, grace, and education are now under unrelenting attack in American culture, as we glorify the lowbrow = and seek mediocrity at the highest levels of our society. It is no wonder that = church musicians are proclaiming their pride of the base while attacking those = who seek higher levels of understanding, education, performance, research, scholarship, and instrument-building. It is no wonder that when entire television channels are devoted = solely to watching others play poker, or drive NASCAR vehicles in circles, = Americans can feel comfortable and proud of being thought fools by the rest of the = world. Hopefully, many in this forum have devoted their lives to music for a gripping spiritual reason, regardless of where they live or to whom they = were born. Some of the greatest artists have come from the humblest of = backgrounds. Others continue to live in daunting conditions because they cannot live elsewhere, either for practical or emotional reasons. They risk those = hardships because it may, on some level other than the practical, be necessary for = their survival. I know that the same square footage that one gets in the = average three-million dollar apartment in my city can be gotten for thirty = thousand dollars, with land, elsewhere in the country. Without naming places, there are = places in this country that are simply unlivable, on human grounds, no matter how =   cheap the price, because the REAL price is too costly.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City