PipeChat Digest #4819 - Tuesday, October 12, 2004
 
Re: Paris Questions
  by "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es>
Re: Setting of Psalm 23 Sought [x-posted, marginally on-topic]
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: Estey Organs
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: Hymn Tempos
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
RE: Hymn Tempos
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Hymn Tempos
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: Paris Questions
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
"Arrival of the Queen of Sheba"
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba"
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Hymn Tempos
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Hymn tempos
  by "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com>
Re: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba"
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Paris Questions
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Hymn tempos
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: Hymn tempos
  by "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org>
"Columbus-ish-y" Organ Music & Columbus Day
  by "James M. Dahlgren" <jmdkimo@yahoo.com>
Re: "Columbus-ish-y" Organ Music & Columbus Day
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Paris Questions
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Paris Questions
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Hymn tempos
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba"
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
RE: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba"
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
RE: Hymn Tempos
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Paris Questions From: "Peter Rodwell" <iof@ctv.es> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 11:39:44 +0200   I always used to stay in Versailles, where the hotel prices are slightly lower and the noise level considerably so. It's only a short train ride from there to the centre of Paris.   Peter.        
(back) Subject: Re: Setting of Psalm 23 Sought [x-posted, marginally on-topic] From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 07:04:22 EDT   In a message dated 10/10/2004 9:12:20 PM Eastern Standard Time, = crl@137.com writes: I do not remember the composer, but I can chord & solfeggio [from memory] the first couple of bars and hope someone can identify it: That is the H Alexander Matthews setting. Wonderful!     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Estey Organs From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 07:04:21 EDT   In a message dated 10/10/2004 4:55:58 PM Eastern Standard Time, quilisma@cox.net writes: I've never heard any of the handful of surviving BIG Esteys ... what are THEY like? There's a large, 4 manual in the Conservatory of Music at the University = of the Pacific in Stockton, CA. It is wonderful! Symphonic stoplist, = including labial Saxophone, and 16' Open Woods (one at "f", one at "ff"), nice loud trombone in the pedal, other color stops and adequate foundations (only 2 = mixtures, as I recall).   A "sister" organ is still at Glide Memorial Methodist in SF, I believe.     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Tempos From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 07:34:42 -0400   From Dennis: "I find that hymn tempos are usually set by congregational custom. We have one congregation here in town that sings all hymns at an absolutely breathtaking pace......most of the other congregations sing faster than I prefer. OTOH, our principal musician (I'm the pastor, not the organist), usually plays slower than I prefer. And I have visited a number of congregations who seemed to equate "stately" and "formal" with "Dragging = out a tune as long as possible." But as a pastor who has worked in and = visited many more congregations, I would suggest that tempos are more a cultural custom than anything else."   This has been my observation as well, based on substituting in = congregations of various Protestant denominations all in the same metropolitan area.   My church doesn't have a music director per se, and although I operate on the assumption that the choir director outranks me, she's not involved in directing or supervising my work except for choral accompanying. So hymn tempo determination is up to me.   I thought my congregation was trained to sing too slowly, so since I = joined them in June I've generally been trying to pick up the tempos a bit. By = this past Sunday they were cooperating with Nun Danket at about 108, but still rebelling at singing "Balm in Gilead" at about 126. I'm hoping to = eventually instill the concept that tempo is somewhat related to style and content.    
(back) Subject: RE: Hymn Tempos From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 06:52:57 -0500   We once had a priest who set the tempos, and he started out verse 1 with breakneck speed, then a little less so on the 2d verse, then slowing down dramatically so that he could sing a part on verses 3 and 4. The tempo on verse two was the ideal of the group. We had a flaming row about it once, and I almost quit over his caustic castigation.   But he left immediately for 3 weeks' vacation. He sent me a bulletin from every church with remarks about the service in the margins, and called me twice to apologize, because he found that my tempo ideas weren't bad at all, particularly compared to what he experienced in New York, Boston, and Arizona (it was a far-flung trip). It may have been the only time he apologized to anyone, and was a good end to a bad story.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Tempos From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 20:39:00 +0800   I have been a church organist for over 70 years. For 50 years of that I = have also been Conductor of the Choir. The practice in West Australia has = always been that the organist sets the pace for the hymns. For myself (pre = Uniting Church Methodist) I have always taken hymns at a fairly brisk pace, and I have only once had a complaint about this. This was when I played for Evensong in the local Anglican Church on one occasion. An old gentleman in =   the choir tackled me after the service saying, "I can't agree with your tempo in the hymns." I replied, "You'll have to excuse me, Tom, as I am a Methodist." He grunted and said, "Well this is not a Methodist Church." As =   soon as this man left me one of the deacons came rushing up and said to = me, "Take no notice of him. He has already got rid of one organist!" Bob Elms.       ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, October 12, 2004 7:34 PM Subject: Re: Hymn Tempos     > From Dennis: "I find that hymn tempos are usually set by congregational =   > custom. We have > one congregation here in town that sings all hymns at an absolutely > breathtaking pace......most of the other congregations sing faster than = I > prefer. OTOH, our principal musician (I'm the pastor, not the = organist), > usually plays slower than I prefer. And I have visited a number of > congregations who seemed to equate "stately" and "formal" with "Dragging =   > out > a tune as long as possible." But as a pastor who has worked in and > visited > many more congregations, I would suggest that tempos are more a cultural > custom than anything else." > > This has been my observation as well, based on substituting in > congregations of various Protestant denominations all in the same > metropolitan area. > > My church doesn't have a music director per se, and although I operate = on > the assumption that the choir director outranks me, she's not involved = in > directing or supervising my work except for choral accompanying. So hymn =   > tempo determination is up to me. > > I thought my congregation was trained to sing too slowly, so since I > joined them in June I've generally been trying to pick up the tempos a > bit. By this past Sunday they were cooperating with Nun Danket at about > 108, but still rebelling at singing "Balm in Gilead" at about 126. I'm > hoping to eventually instill the concept that tempo is somewhat related = to > style and content. > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: RE: Paris Questions From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 08:44:19 -0500   I would recommend not spending any time in Notre Dame for music-unless time's free to be spent, and you've heard everything else you want to hear. I've been there for a few events, and generally, there's so much tourist traffic in the side-aisles moving all around the church perimeter (on the inside) that you can't hear much of the music-there's always this dull roar of people shuffling and talking. Perhaps other list members know of occasions when you can go and not hear that noise, but I never discovered it, and have heard that it is pretty much the case all the time. (Besides that, I daresay that the cathedral is "standing room" only on Christmas Eve.)   =20   There are many other nice choices-   =20   St. Sulpice, Madeliene, La Trinite', St. Vincent de Paul, St. Gervais-St. Protais, St. Clotilde, St. Eustache, and on. Even though thery're not "cathedrals," the level of music performed in these churches is magnificent-and if I were to go, I'm not sure which one I'd pick!   =20   Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri   =20   =20   I heard the organ at Notre Dame in a recital but liked the St. Eustache   organ better, if that's allowed.   =20   I'd be eager to see others' reactions to these suggestions.   =20   Karl E. Moyer   Lancaster PA   =20   =20  
(back) Subject: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 10:48:44 -0400   I am in dire need of "Queen of Sheba" for an upcoming wedding. Yes, the = bride wants it for her processional, and will not be talked out of it.   So I need to learn it.   Thing is, I can't find it anywhere for organ.   HALP!   Thanks to all.   --Shirley    
(back) Subject: Re: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 10:53:45 -0400   It's in the Oxford Book of Wedding Music. It does not make a good processional, but it would make a good recessional.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu         on 10/12/04 10:48 AM, Shirley at pnst.shirley@verizon.net wrote:   > I am in dire need of "Queen of Sheba" for an upcoming wedding. Yes, the = bride > wants it for her processional, and will not be talked out of it. > > So I need to learn it. > > Thing is, I can't find it anywhere for organ. > > HALP! > > Thanks to all. > > --Shirley > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn Tempos From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 07:56:06 -0700 (PDT)   Stately is the best way to take any hymns. Not too fast and with good = breath in between verses. Thats my petpeave, the breathing between verses. = I like to give the English feel with q good 2 seconds between verses. = sometimes, I add gathering notes to add touch depending on the tune. Hymns = in 4/4 I take in 2, hymns in 3/4 I take in 1, and hymns in 3/2 and other = meters like that, I take in 3. Thats from Service Playing class.       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Hymn tempos From: "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 10:58:18 -0400   My 2=A2 worth: Where the choir director and the organist are not the=20=   same person, I believe the organist should set the tempos, as the=20 organist knows what (s)he is capable of in terms of getting the notes=20 right, making registrational changes where appropriate, etc. The=20 tempo should be one where the text can be sung on one breath per=20 phrase, "phrase" meaning from one punctuation mark to another, even if=20=   the phrase doesn't quite fit the cadences. After all, it is the text=20 which is important, not the accompaniment.   David Baker=    
(back) Subject: Re: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 11:12:58 -0400   Arrangemens of this vary greatly in difficulty. For the most effect with the least work, I suggest Colin Hand's arrangement published by Mayhew (Mel Bay MC96034 or Mayhew 1400035). Five pages in length, it's part of the company's "Music for organ made playable" series.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   Shirley wrote:   >I am in dire need of "Queen of Sheba" for an upcoming wedding. Yes, the = bride >wants it for her processional, and will not be talked out of it. > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Paris Questions From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 11:20:47 -0400   At 10:50 PM 2004-10-11 -0400, you wrote:   > I heard the organ at Notre Dame in a recital but liked the St. = Eustache >organ better, if that's allowed. > > I'd be eager to see others' reactions to these suggestions. > > Karl E. Moyer > Lancaster PA   Karl,   You are very much allowed to say that. The St. Eustache organ is one of the most spectacular instruments in the world, being quasi French, Dutch, and Symphonic. It is also in a spectacular acoustic.   My guess is that the C-C organ at Notre Dame, is not his best effort. St. =   Sulpice is considered by most to be a superior instrument, as well as St. Ouen, and maybe a few others.   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn tempos From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 10:23:45 -0500   Has anyone heard the Dutch sing hymns? Very slow, very majestic, very powerful. Strong tempos are good. There is nothing worse than hearing a hymn with 16'-mixture played very fast. It ruins the whole sound. Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn tempos From: "Roger Brown" <roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 01:29:10 +1000   On Wed, 13 Oct 2004 12:58 am, David Baker wrote:   > I believe the organist should set the tempos, as the > organist knows what (s)he is capable of in terms of getting the notes > right, making registrational changes where appropriate, etc. =A0   Ideally so - and that is precisely what I was encouraged to do as organist = in=20 those situations. But the problem of what to do when the organist fails to= =20 set appropriate tempi is what is at issue here - and ultimately the person = in=20 charge of the music needs to step in.   As implied in your post, this works best if the choir director is familiar= =20 with, and preferably plays, the organ. To give but one example, a non=20 organist would rarely understand precisely what is required so far as tempo= =20 is concerned for the last verse of Parry's Laudate Dominum.   =2D-=20 Roger Brown robrown@melbpc.org.au roger2@rogerbrown.no-ip.org http://rogerbrown.no-ip.org  
(back) Subject: "Columbus-ish-y" Organ Music & Columbus Day From: "James M. Dahlgren" <jmdkimo@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 08:46:34 -0700 (PDT)   Listers,   Today is Columbus Day, is anyone aware of any Organ Music specifically composed for the occasion? I know of the Columbus Suite of Victor Herbert, composed for the 1893 World's Fair - but that is for orchestra. Given that there were organ demonstrations at the fair, it would seem that there might be "Columbus-ish-y" Organ music out there, somewhere   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D "In the end we shall have had enough of cynicism, skepticism and humbug = and we shall all want to live more musically" - Vincent Van Gogh   James Milne Dahlgren 225 East 3rd Street, Apartment 7 San Angelo, Texas 76903 (325) 212-4343     _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Declare Yourself - Register online to vote today! http://vote.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: "Columbus-ish-y" Organ Music & Columbus Day From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 09:57:19 -0600   Hello, James, et al: > Today is Columbus Day, is anyone aware of any Organ > Music specifically composed for the occasion? ? ? ? Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean ? ? ? I remember when it was the theme of the Voice of America transmissions, directed at the Iron Curtain. . . . and I wanted to set a majestic arrangement for pipe organ to replace the orchestral arrangement.   F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Paris Questions From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 09:03:12 -0700       Arie Vandenberg wrote:   > At 10:50 PM 2004-10-11 -0400, you wrote: > >> I heard the organ at Notre Dame in a recital but liked the St. >> Eustache >> organ better, if that's allowed. >> >> I'd be eager to see others' reactions to these suggestions. >> >> Karl E. Moyer >> Lancaster PA > > > Karl, > > You are very much allowed to say that. The St. Eustache organ is one of =   > the most spectacular instruments in the world, being quasi French, > Dutch, and Symphonic. It is also in a spectacular acoustic. > > My guess is that the C-C organ at Notre Dame, is not his best effort.   The Parisian organ "powers that are" were offered a museum-quality restoration of the Notre Dame organ to its original Cavaille-Coll state as one of the options before the last rebuild; sadly, they chose further changes, additions, computers, and solid-state gear instead. The Positif case remains in storage.   Notre Dame and St. Clotilde ceased to be Cavaille-Coll organs quite some time ago. Notre Dame has been electrocuted, and rebuilt at least twice; I understand that it sounds better than it has in years following the second rebuild, but it cannot be called a Cavaille-Coll by any stretch of the imagination.   Tournemire authorized the first rebuild of St. Clotilde, and Langlais the second; now there has been a third, which is somewhat controversial. I don't recall offhand whether it was electrocuted in the first or second rebuild; but it was not reversed in the last rebuild.   > St. Sulpice is considered by most to be a superior instrument, as well > as St. Ouen, and maybe a few others. > > Arie V. > >   St. Sulpice has been restored without changes, including the Barker levers, except for the two Mutin pedal stops added in honor of Widor's retirement, which were much-needed for clarity in the Pedal, and were allowed to remain.   St. Ouen is also in original condition, but its fate is in doubt, as the church is now closed, and is only used very occasionally for orchestral and choral concerts ... I have to wonder if the organ is maintained.   St. Eustache is basically a new organ, re-using a few pipes from the old organ, which, as I recall, was NOT a Cavaille-Coll.   Sacre Coeur is worth hearing, though the constant round of services doesn't allow for many recitals ... the church has perpetual Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament, with devotions every hour on the hour, or something like that ... I understand the rebuild there still didn't solve some of the perennial problems ... runs in the chests (and extremely slow stop action?).   Someone asked me the other day about the fate of the various orgues du choeur in these churches ... aside from reading that the one at Sacre Coeur still exists, but is seldom used, and that Notre Dame's had loudspeakers (!) added to it so it could be used while the Grand Orgue was being rebuilt, I have no idea ...   I know that Franck played the Orgue du Choeur at St. Clotilde for a couple of years until the Grand Orgue was built, but I don't know if it was a pipe organ or a Mustel harmonium, or if it still exists ... evidently the singing choir has been moved to the lower west gallery and the Grand Orgue's new console has been placed there.   There is at least one Paris church that maintains a Latin High Mass with choir, and I think it's the Madeleine, but I can't remember.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: RE: Paris Questions From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 12:21:37 -0400   Karl,   You are very much allowed to say that. The St. Eustache organ is one = of=20 the most spectacular instruments in the world, being quasi French, = Dutch,=20 and Symphonic. It is also in a spectacular acoustic.   My guess is that the C-C organ at Notre Dame, is not his best effort. = St.=20 Sulpice is considered by most to be a superior instrument, as well as = St.=20 Ouen, and maybe a few others.   Arie V.   I agree with your every word. Albert Schweitzer (probably echoing his = teacher Widor) considered the organ of S. Sulpice the most beautiful in = the world. The new recordings of German music by Roth bear this out. = We should not be surprised that it excels in French music, of course, = but when it gives such an account of the likes of Reubke and Karg-Elert = as to make one suppose that this music, too, could have been composed = for it, one gets a new respect for its versatility. Kudos to Roth as = well for this feat. We must remember that it's basically a tracker = organ he's playing there!   And, yes, the organ of S. Eustache is new, of a creative and original = design by Guillou. The recording featuring his own suite "Hyperion: the = rhetoric of fire" blows me away with its eloquence and vivid colors. = This instrument seems to have it all.   When I last visited Paris, I went to Sunday morning mass twice at S. = Sulpice and was not disappointed. One will, perhaps, encounter tourists = there today whom one wouldn't have in the past: the church figured in = the novel _The Da Vinci Code_. Consequently, so many curious readers = come around trying to sniff out the esoteric iconography hiding places = described in this mystery that, according to a radio report a few days = ago, the pastor has published an explanation, available in the narthex, = of the real meaning of some of the symbolism in the church-- probably a = kind of "frequently asked questions" file. People forget that this book = is *fiction*. They're just grown-up little kids looking for platform = 9-3/4 :-)   During World War I, the windows of Notre Dame Cathedral were removed, = leaving the organ exposed to the elements. People say understandably = that it never sounded the same after that.      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn tempos From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 12:29:00 -0400   At 11:23 AM 10/12/2004, Scott Montgomery wrote: >Has anyone heard the Dutch sing hymns? Very slow, very majestic, very >powerful. Strong tempos are good. There is nothing worse than hearing a =   >hymn with 16'-mixture played very fast. It ruins the whole sound.   On the radio station, CFRC-FM, where I had my programme, "Voicings", we also had a Dutch Hymn Sing programme.   I was always astounded at how the Dutch hymns sounded so impressive at the =   slower tempi than I was used to, - even some of the tunes that we were familiar with sounded better to my ears than they do when an Anglican = Choir sang them.   I had a lot of comments sent to me, as Classical Music Director, asking = for more programmes like the Dutch programme, but we only had one half hour tape sent to us each week, so I couldn't add to the one programme that we aired.   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Re: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 17:33:59 +0100   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, October 12, 2004 4:12 PM Subject: Re: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba"     > Arrangemens of this vary greatly in difficulty.   It's not the easiest to pick-up quickly; the opening theme is somewhat = akin to Widor's 5th (i.e. arpeggios set against chords) then it moves on to imitation (what in jazz would be called 'a chase').   I find it convenient to play from the second section onward on very quiet pipes when-ever the bride is a little late arriving; it introduces the = music to the waiting congregation and allows them to enjoy the piece, without giving them a false impression of her arrival.   And it's already out on the desk when, it's usually the photographer, = deigns to allow her to walk into the church and actually become married.   Grrrrrrr .............. those "=A3$%^&* photographers; SO MUCH more = trouble than they're worth. If ever there was (going very so slightly off-topic here) a more worthless =   profession - which charged more exorbitantly - for so little of real worth =   ............ it would have to be _ _ _ _ _ _ _.   (Start your own strand of mail here by suggesting what it would be)   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a hot-under-the-collar musicman]    
(back) Subject: RE: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 12:46:22 -0400   Well, if you don't find it in print (by the way, it's from "SOLOMON"), = might I suggest you have the sound guy play a recording of it....     HA HA HA (just kidding, and ducking under the desk).   Neil  
(back) Subject: RE: Hymn Tempos From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Tue, 12 Oct 2004 12:51:10 -0400   > And I have visited a number of congregations who seemed to equate = "stately" and "formal" with "Dragging out a tune as long as possible." =20   IMHO, there's nothing like the leadership of the soaring, penetrating = voices of a good boy treble section to make a hymn thrilling when sung = slowly. Lacking this, one might need to speed up a little more than is = ideal.   I agree with Prof. Miriam Duncan's remarks (which I posted here a couple = years ago) that hymns tend to be too fast nowadays, so fast that they = sound NeRvOuS. Church services can well evoke various emotions on = various occasions, but can you think of a single situation in which the = effect should be of nervousness? We should be especially careful of = tunes in 3/4 time not to make them sound like waltzes. Yes, the tempi = that people expect are partly cultural, but the church should be partly = countercultural! As a friend observed, it is our lot to be living = during "the great American speedup," in part a conspiracy of our various = slavedrivers. It would be an irresponsible copout for the church to = surrender to the same demonic forces on what is supposedly "our day of = rest."   One clue is a tune's "harmonic rhythm". When the harmony changes with = nearly every note of the melody, it should be done more slowly than when = it changes only once or twice per measure.   I share Desiree's "pet peeve" about some organists' taking too little = time between stanzas. You don't want to reward the most conscientious = and enthusiastic singers in your congregation by leaving them so out of = breath that they feel like keeling over after the Amen!