PipeChat Digest #4823 - Wednesday, October 13, 2004
 
RE: vocalion
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
RE: vocalion
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Photographers and Vocalions
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: vocalion
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: vocalion
  by "firman1" <firman1@prodigy.net>
RE: vocalion
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: AGO
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: vocalion
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
Re: vocalion
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Photographer Confession
  by "James M. Dahlgren" <jmdkimo@yahoo.com>
Flashy short postludes?
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
functional, fun, sight-readable 3-5 minute postludes
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Who's going to Columbus?
  by "Mike" <organist@clover.net>
Bud and Burgie are moving
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by <JerryM8319@aol.com>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: vocalion From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 15:34:26 -0400   Hi,   If I am not mistaken, the Vocalion was different from regular reed organs,= =20 in that they blew air through the reed rather than sucked the air through=20 the reed when played. Maybe I got this backwards, but I do remember=20 someone telling me something like this.   AV     >The vocalion was a sort of glorified reed organ. You might say it was the= =20 >type of instrument that represented the pinnacle of reed-organ=20 >building. Unlike smaller cottage and church reed organs, the vocalions=20 >had many more sets of reeds, some of them quite striking in their=20 >voicing. Many had multiple manuals, a pedal-clavier, swell and crescendo= =20 >shoes, and even pedal movements for combination actions. Some were pumped= =20 >by hand, by foot, both, or by electricity. > >I think the real distinguishing factor, however, was that in a vocalion=20 >the reeds spoke into resonating chambers intended for the purpose of=20 >refining the tone to more closely resemble that of wind-blown pipes. One= =20 >example Ive seen even had banks(sets, or ranks, if you like) of reeds=20 >stacked on top of one another behind a pipe fa=E7ade in the upper half of= =20 >the instrument. Between the fa=E7ade and the reeds was a set of expression= =20 >shutters. > > > >You can see pictures of instruments at the following links: > > > ><http://www.reedsoc.org/organs/masonandrischvocalion.htm>http://www.reedsoc= ..org/organs/masonandrischvocalion.htm > >http://www.reedsoc.org/organs/masonandrischvocalion.htm > > > >Following is a quote from=20 ><http://www.reedsoc.org/RepairV2/introduction.htm>http://www.reedsoc.org/Re= pairV2/introduction.htm=20 >that explains in terms of the human voice how the modifying chambers in a= =20 >vocalion organ work: > > > >Your lungs provide the pressure (the lower action) >Your glottal stop is the valve operated by each key >Your vocal cords create the vibrations (as do the reeds) >Your mouth is the chamber into which the reed speaks ("formative", in=20 >acoustic-talk) >Your lips are the mute that shuts the sound on and off. > >That formative is important. Just as you change the timbre of your voice=20 >by constantly re-shaping your mouth, the cavity into which a reed speaks=20 >can have a marked effect on the final sound (along with matters having to= =20 >do with the scale and shape of the reed itself, of course). Some reed=20 >organs are fitted with "qualifying tubes" - chambers of various sorts into= =20 >which one or more reeds are allowed to speak. The ultimate in this design= =20 >is the Vocalion, which can have a bewildering variety of chambers to=20 >modify the sound. > > > > > >The types of qualifying tubesthat Clough & Warren used and patented were=20 >Scribner qualifying tubesand they look like unstopped wooden organ pipes=20 >attached at the sides. They are placed over the Diapason rank in their=20 >1887 Auxilary Pipe Organwhich was really a vocalion, complete with=20 >shutters, a resonating chamber, and elaborately stenciled pipe fa=E7ade of= =20 >which the pipe are carved from solid pieces of wood. > > > >Hope this helps. > > > >Best regards, > > > >Daniel Hancock > >Springfield, Missouri > > > >  
(back) Subject: RE: vocalion From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 14:48:55 -0500   Hi,   If I am not mistaken, the Vocalion was different from regular reed organs, in that they blew air through the reed rather than sucked the air through the reed when played. Maybe I got this backwards, but I do remember someone telling me something like this.   AV       =20   The harmonium certainly operated on air pressure, but the American reed organ operation on suction-and since the vocalion is an American innovation, I think it can be said that it, too, operated on suction. The Clough & Warren organ I've had first hand-experience with operates on suction. Perhaps there are others that differ, does anyone else know?   =20   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri   =20            
(back) Subject: Photographers and Vocalions From: "First Christian Church of Casey, Illinois" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 14:57:15 -0500   As a pastor, I always talk with the couple ahead of time--and at the rehearsal--about what the photographer is allowed to do and not allowed to do. I also touch base with the photographer before the ceremony begins. With all that in place, I have never had a problem.   As for the Vocalion, I love the image of calling it a "Voca-Lion," and thinking of it roaring away!   Dennis Steckley   "Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened."--Dr. Seuss        
(back) Subject: Re: vocalion From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 13:13:50 -0700   As I recall, "Vocalion" was a brand-name, but also a style. They were pressure reed organs like the French harmoniums, as opposed to suction reed organs, like most American reed organs.   Unlike the big 2m Esteys, which had the reed-boxes directly under the keys, the Vocalion reed boxes were in the top half of the case, which looked like an overgrown upright piano with open grille-work. Some had fake pipe facades that looked sorta like old Moller Artistes. Since the reed boxes weren't directly under the keys, they had a typical sticker-and-square tracker action from the manual and pedal keys to the valves, and felt more like a small tracker pipe organ, rather than having that "squishy" characteristic reed-organ attack.   The reeds spoke into wooden "qualifying tubes", usually small rectangular blocks of wood with a round hole bored through them, placed in front of each reed. They were basically little megaphones ... I never saw any that were cut to pitch-length ... they were laid horizontally facing the front of the case, so the sound of the reeds REALLY projected, with the reed-boxes in that elevated position. The wooden tubes also mellowed the sound of the reeds ... some of those organs could produce a really nice fluty Stopped Diapason sound. The Trumpet and Oboe stops were also better than the typical suction reed organ.   Mason and Hamlin and a couple of others built pressure reed organs ... I really can't remember now whether there was an actual "Vocalion" company, or if that was just the name of the style of building.   I still think that if someone could combine that physical layout with Mustel's style of harmonium reed-voicing, and maybe Estey's electro-pneumatic action, which they used on their 2m EPRO model reed organ, they could come up with something really good. E/P action would even make it possible to have the reed-boxes in separate cabinets.   A LOT of old RC churches in the East and Midwest had various kinds of reed-organs in the organ-loft as backups in case of power failures, once they went to electric blowers for their pipe organs. Some of them were still in good condition, and the sound they made in those big, reverberant churches was AMAZING.   It has been said that a good Mustel in good acoustics could mimic the sound of a small Cavaille-Coll orgue du choeur, and I can believe it. In point of fact, smaller French churches HAD harmoniums for the orgue du choeur ... I remember hearing one somewhere out in the middle of nowhere in France ... we happened on a Mass in progress, and the congregation was singing enthusiastically to the accompaniment of what looked like a large 2m harmonium. There was what looked to be an historic pipe organ in the west gallery, but it wasn't being played.   Cheers,   Bud   BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote:   > anybody ever heard of an instrument called a vocalion? a personal > recollection in the written early history of my church states: > > "another triumph attending the entry into our new building [ca. > 1890s] was our vocalion, a movable instrument that stands somewhere > between a cottage-organ and a pipe-organ. ours was furnished with a > man-power pump behind." > > i'm assuming that the cottage organ would have been a regular reed > organ, but i'm stumped as to what a vocalion is. > > anybody? > > scot > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for > pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : > http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: > <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: > <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: > <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: vocalion From: "firman1" <firman1@prodigy.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 15:15:13 -0500   Vocalions mostly operated on pressure. A few small ones were suction. = The Aeolian Company bought the Vocalion plant and produced the = Orchestrelle, a player organ. Mine is a large pressure operated = instrument. The roll fits in a pressurized spool-box closed with a = sliding glass door....just like my Aeolian Pipe Organ. The Orchestrelle, too, has vertical banks of reeds, each of them having = qualifying chambers that the reeds speak into. They are amazingly = pipe-like in timbre.=20 Berley A. Firmin II
(back) Subject: RE: vocalion From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 15:17:28 -0500   =20   The reeds spoke into wooden "qualifying tubes", usually small=20   rectangular blocks of wood with a round hole bored through them, placed=20   in front of each reed. They were basically little megaphones ... I never=20   saw any that were cut to pitch-length ... they were laid horizontally=20   facing the front of the case, so the sound of the reeds REALLY=20   projected, with the reed-boxes in that elevated position. The wooden=20   tubes also mellowed the sound of the reeds ... some of those organs=20   could produce a really nice fluty Stopped Diapason sound. The Trumpet=20   and Oboe stops were also better than the typical suction reed organ.   =20   The Clough & Warren organ (if it can be called a "vocalion") that I've pl= ayed has "Scribner qualifying tubes" on top of the Diapason "rank" of ree= ds. The tubes are attached to one another from side to side, are made o= f wood, are vertical in orientation (like organ pipes), decrease in heigh= t, according to pitch. Whether or not that is necessary, I don't know. = But it's a gorgeous Diapason sound to be coming from a reed organ. In th= is organ, too the reeds are located in under the keys, and behind the key= action, but all on the same horizontal plane. There is a resonating cha= mber that all reeds and qualifying tubes speak into, and a knee swell ope= rates vertical swell shades from behind the pipe fa=E7ade. It creates a = rich sound.   =20   Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: AGO From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 13:22:37 -0700       Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   > AGO----- > So I applied for a job.....the previous was fired and Florida is an at > will fire/work state. > > After I made my interest known, the former filed with the AGO. > > They moderately said the previous had a point. And so sided politely > with the fired.   > Church agreed to AGO recommendations. > > I am a member of said church...and took the position. > > oops----- > > So shall I resign the AGO now or wait.....member 36 years and past Dean. > > Free advice sought. Know you get what you pay for but this esteem group > might have ideas......... > > want everyone happy but am keeping the job.... > > dale in Florida   What recommendations? Changes in job description/personnel procedures?   Unless the previous organist filed a formal grievance with the AGO, AND the whole investigation and mediation process was gone through, AND the Guild made a finding of "wrongful termination," he doesn't have any basis for complaint.   Go to the national AGO website ... the whole grievance procedure is spelled out in GREAT detail.   Florida being a fire-at-will state doesn't have anything to do with Guild procedures, which are advisory to Guild members. The whole Guild grievance procedure is just to warn Guild members away from "problem" churches, basically.   IF the church broke a written contract with the previous organist, that may be legally actionable, but it usually isn't worth the time/effort/money to pursue it. Plus most churches will blackball you in a HEARTBEAT if you attempt to take them to court.   Nice folks. Glad I'm retired.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Re: vocalion From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 16:51:54 -0500   Vocalian was a brand of reed pump organ. I used to own one. James James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Creator of Handsome Hardwood Caster Cups (314) 608-4137 WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, October 13, 2004 1:50 PM Subject: vocalion     > anybody ever heard of an instrument called a vocalion? a personal recollection in the written early history of my church states: > > "another triumph attending the entry into our new building [ca. 1890s] = was our vocalion, a movable instrument that stands somewhere between a cottage-organ and a pipe-organ. ours was furnished with a man-power pump behind." > > i'm assuming that the cottage organ would have been a regular reed = organ, but i'm stumped as to what a vocalion is. > > anybody? > > scot > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: Re: vocalion From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 17:51:50 EDT   I saw one of these a couple of years ago in the Dobson organ shop. It was a good 10-12 feet tall with pipe facade, nine stops and must have weighed at least a couple of tons. it looked like a small tracker, but I was disappointed that it wasn't playing. As I understood the story this was Lynn Dobson's baby. I don't know what happened to it after that. The LA cathedral organ was still there at the time. Ron Severin  
(back) Subject: Photographer Confession From: "James M. Dahlgren" <jmdkimo@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 15:23:35 -0700 (PDT)   I confess, it was not an healthy way for me to handle the situation. When I was confronted with an overly obnoxious photographer and a "weenie" presiding. I "accidentally" tripped the breaker switch [well, I called a friend on my cell phone and he flipped the switch in the basement] on the lights and the camera. It was a 6 of one 1/2 doz. situation; I couldn't see with the lights in my face and then I couldn't see when the lights went out. "Weenie" presiding pronounced the selective black-out "a blessing."   James     _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Declare Yourself - Register online to vote today! http://vote.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Flashy short postludes? From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 18:04:38 -0500   Inasmuch as I am called on to help out low-brow Methodists about once or twice every other month, I am looking for flashy, medium difficulty, short (3-4 minute) postludes that do not require lots of stop changes (the small tracker with no pistons and heavy drawknobs).   Thanks for your suggestions.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 16:28:43 -0700   One word:   Lorenz.   They have zillions of albums of just what you're looking for. At most you might have to change manuals and/or take off the Gt to Ped (grin), or pull the Trumpet (if you've got one).   Check their online catalog, and also their three quarterly organ mags, probably the most music for the money:   The Organist - easiest, two staves The Organ Portfolio - easy-easy/medium, three stave The Sacred Organ Journal - easy/medium-medium, three staves   Lorenz, purveyors of fine organ and choir fodder since before 1900 (chuckle).   I actually have some English/GERMAN Lorenz choir mags from before WWII when there were still enough Deutsches Evangelische Kirches with German-language services for there to be a market for them.   The Lorenz family, if I recall correctly, was German Lutheran.   At one point, The Choir Leader (at least) contained standard numbers by Anglican composers that wouldn't blush to be included in a typical Anglican church's service-lists.   Southwestern Baptist Seminary in Ft. Worth has an almost-complete collection of Lorenz choir mags going back to the 1890s; Lorenz has told me that anything printed before 1923 or so is in the public domain. I got Southwestern to send me photocopies of a year or two's worth, until my contact got bored/retired/dried up/whatever.   They have a HUGE library of SERIOUS choral stuff (and presumably organ as well), if you're looking for off-the-beaten-path things.   Cheers,   Bud   Glenda wrote:   > Inasmuch as I am called on to help out low-brow Methodists about once or > twice every other month, I am looking for flashy, medium difficulty, > short (3-4 minute) postludes that do not require lots of stop changes > (the small tracker with no pistons and heavy drawknobs). > > Thanks for your suggestions. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 19:40:41 -0400   Liquescent wrote:   > One word: > > Lorenz. > > They have zillions of albums of just what you're looking for. At most > you might have to change manuals and/or take off the Gt to Ped (grin), > or pull the Trumpet (if you've got one). > > Check their online catalog, and also their three quarterly organ mags, > probably the most music for the money: > > The Organist - easiest, two staves > The Organ Portfolio - easy-easy/medium, three stave > The Sacred Organ Journal - easy/medium-medium, three staves > Have you ever checked out the composers in some of these Lorenz publications? Seems that Lani Smith, Franklin Ritter, Edward Broughton, and David Paxton are the same person. Now you know why so many of the pieces sound similar. That multi-named person happens to be female.   For what it's worth, I have yet to recommend the Lorenz pediodicals to any of the hundreds of organ students I've taught over the years. It's probably just a matter of personal taste. Still, when students latch on to these on their own, they seem to lose interest quickly.   I'll take Wayne Leupold's "Organist Companion" (Warner Brothers) over the Lorenz publications any day. Some of the pieces Wayne includes will take a bit of work, but they seem to have an inherent quality that makes them more worth the extra effort.   Steve Best in Utica, NY    
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 18:49:39 -0500   Being one of those "low-brow Methodists" why not try "A festival Trumpet Tune" by David German. Lots of fun and one key change. Gary ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, October 13, 2004 6:04 PM Subject: Flashy short postludes?     > Inasmuch as I am called on to help out low-brow Methodists about once or > twice every other month, I am looking for flashy, medium difficulty, > short (3-4 minute) postludes that do not require lots of stop changes > (the small tracker with no pistons and heavy drawknobs). > > Thanks for your suggestions. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: functional, fun, sight-readable 3-5 minute postludes From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 17:28:13 -0700   My recommendation stands, Stephen.   They are organ fodder, no more, no less; that's what Glenda was asking = for.   I play (or used to play, before I retired) Clavieruebung III (small and large), Great Eighteen, Schuebler, most of the Preludes and Fugues, and virtually every chorale-prelude in The Church Organist's Golden Treasury, Vols, 1, 2, 3.   Guess what the favorites were of the MOST sophisticated congregation I EVER played for in 50 years' time (a straospherically-high anglo-catholic church in tony Newport Beach, CA)?   Triumphal March - Grieg - At the Console Sarabande - Boehm - ditto anything by ANY Victorian American or British composer anything from the Lorenz mags anything from Fr. Rossini's Liturgical Organist series (Longer = Compositions)   GLENDA! THAT'S ONE I FORGOT (grin) - Fr. Rossini!   Oh ... and they liked a few of the "bouncy" pieces from the Couperin Organ Masses (chuckle), particularly the Trompette pieces.   Other than that, if I played Bach, etc., they chattered like magpies during the final voluntary.   What they MOST preferred was a SHORT trashy-crashy-flashy romantic improv on the Recessional hymn, and I was pleased to oblige them.   I gave up trying to "elevate" congregations' tastes ... oh ... about half-way through my career (chuckle) ... it makes for ulcers and short tenures.   If they wanted "O Holy Night" and "Gesu Bambino" and "Silent Night" by candlelight every Christmas Eve, they GOT it.   If they wanted "Were You There" a cappella on Good Friday (this in the midst of the anglo-catholic Good Friday Liturgy, mind you), they GOT it.   If they wanted the 300s-400s from the Episcopal Hymnal 1940 during communion, they GOT them.   In return, I got to do all the plainsong and classical polyphony I wanted.   Not a bad trade-off, that.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Who's going to Columbus? From: "Mike" <organist@clover.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 21:48:55 -0700   Hi,   God willing and the creeks don't rise (which the have several times this summer :-) I'll be at 1st cong. to hear the restored Kimball. How many from the list are planning to be there? I know Mike Gettelman said he'd be there. I just wondered if there are any others. I don't know how we'd find each other. I'm usually easy to spot since my suit coats are generally on the long side.   Best wishes, Mike Swaldo    
(back) Subject: Bud and Burgie are moving From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 19:10:33 -0700   Raymond H. "Bud" Clark Clyde E. "Burgie" Burgoon 3344 32nd St. San Diego, CA 92104-4738   Same E-mails ...   Bud:   quilisma@cox.net   Burgie:   beejayusa@cox.net (which is also our PayPal account, for music donations)   I'm not posting the new phone number to the lists ... e-mail me privately if you need it.   All effective Nov. 1, 2004.   We got a slightly cheaper cottage, with some light property management work for Burgie included. It's closer to where I used to live in Golden Hills ... 32nd St., a couple of blocks south of Upas. 32nd Street dead-ends into the canyon a few blocks later, so it'll be quieter, and less traffic.   The owner of the place where we're living now has indicated he has no intention of repairing any of the damage done by the soil testing, beyond filling in the trench eventually ... the fence, the yard, the garden ... all gone. And we NEED the fence, at least ... University is a MAJOR thoroughfare.   I'm virtually a prisoner in the house ... the sidewalks and the driveways are all torn up ... Burgie has to climb over mounds of dirt to get in ... we don't have access to the driveway or the garage ... people have to carry things out of the house over plywood panels covering the 20-foot-deep trench in the yard ... I can't use the wheelchair ... it's a NIGHTMARE.   We were given NO notice that it was going to be done, and NO compensation ... and I don't have the money or the energy to fight it legally. So we're just ... moving.   He obviously just wants all the tenants OUT so he can proceed with his condo plans, and this is the easiest way to do it.   Fine. We're outta here (grin).   Cheers,   Bud                  
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: <JerryM8319@aol.com> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 22:27:03 EDT   Toccata Brevis by Gawthrop might work.   Jerry Atlanta  
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: "Gary Black" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2004 22:44:12 -0500   You bet Jerry, I like that one too. Gary ----- Original Message -----=20 From: JerryM8319@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Wednesday, October 13, 2004 9:27 PM Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes?     Toccata Brevis by Gawthrop might work.   Jerry Atlanta