PipeChat Digest #4825 - Thursday, October 14, 2004
 
Re: Zoo question
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: Short lively pieces for voluntaries
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net>
Taco Bell Cannon
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
RE: Flashy short postludes?
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Taco Bell Cannon
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Taco Bell Cannon
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
First U. Lutheran Hammond, IN 10/17
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Bud and Burgie are moving
  by "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net>
Re: Bud and Burgie are moving
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
RE: Flashy short postludes?
  by "Henry Glass" <henry@melbay.com>
vester catalog
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
RE: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba"
  by "Henry Glass" <henry@melbay.com>
RE: Flashy short postludes?
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: Taco Bell Cannon
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: vester catalog
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Speaking of Short Postludes
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
RE: Taco Bell Cannon
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Zoo question From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 12:08:56 +0100   From that treasure-chest, the 1911 Methodist School Hymnal   (Tune - Providence DCM)   Who taught the little birds to sing their songs so glad and free ? Who taught them how to build their nests away up in the tree ? Who taught the busy little bees to gather honey sweet ? Who taught them how to store it up for boys and girls to eat ?   'Tis God our Heav'nly Father good, Who made and cares for all - For birds and bees and shining stars, He knows if one should fall. And if he cares for little things and tells them what to do, He surely loves his children more and watches o'er them too.     Bruce Miles   website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html ----- Original Message ----- From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, September 13, 2004 5:01 AM Subject: Zoo question     > "His Eye is on the Sparrow" - isn't necessarily focused on an animal = other > than the Scriptural reference that since His [God's] eye is on the > sparrow, > I know that He watches me. > > The children's Christmas song, "Jesus, Our Brother, Kind and Good". = Each > verse after the first is sung by a different animal that might have been > somewhere around the manger at the Nativity. > > In light of that, I'd like to ask the following question. Lest someone > again accuse me of trying to accuse someone else of something, I'd like = to > qualify it up front that I'm not using a judgmental tone in asking this > question: > > What does a "service of blessing of animals" have to do with church or > with > worship? I guess the mention that it is occuring on an October = afternoon > indicates that this isn't taking the place of the usual worship service. > > Another question - again, not meant to be posed in a judgmental tone - = if > this is a "service" and is being held in a church for the purpose of > calling > down some kind of blessing on the animals [God's creatures, of course] = in > the sense that it will be a religious service, then are the cute secular > pieces that were suggested really appropriate? I'm assuming that the > original question about music was asked in seriousness. > > Actually, I was going to suggest "Kitten on the Keys" as a joke, but > somebody beat me to it. > > Keith > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 20:20:23 +0800   Ah! Caleb Simper voluntaries, a dozen or more volumes, played all the time =   by little old ladies playing the reed organs in the 1920s, 1930s, and = later by me because in the mid 1930s that's about all you could buy in this = state. His music served its purpose at the time I guess, but is now quite passe. Caleb Simper's anthems also filled the need for small church choirs for = some time. Who could forget King of Kings? They all followed the same pattern - =   big introduction in 4/4 or 6/8 time by choir and FF organ - change of = tempo into a reflective 3/4 time signature and/or a solo by a screechy soprano - =   return to big opening theme in 4/4 and wind up FFF with full organ. Big finish!! Recognize the pattern? Anyone want some Caleb Simper anthems? We have a stockpile in our choir cupboard partly devoured by silver fish, and =   brown with age. I haven't the heart to throw them out!! Cheers, Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, October 14, 2004 3:30 PM Subject: RE: Flashy short postludes?     >my organ tutor warned me about 50 years ago - Caleb Semper. He said, > "Don't ever play that muck!" I never have, but sometimes someone gives = me > a > pile of music which includes volumes of CS. Every one is almost > identical - > full of Victorian chromaticims. > > Will Light > Coventry UK > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Stephen Best > Sent: 14 October 2004 00:41 > To: PipeChat > For what it's worth, I have yet to recommend the Lorenz pediodicals to > any of the hundreds of organ students I've taught over the years. It's > probably just a matter of personal taste. Still, when students latch on > to these on their own, they seem to lose interest quickly. > > Steve Best in Utica, NY > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: RE: Short lively pieces for voluntaries From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 07:17:43 -0500   No, John. I do have a modicum of taste below which I will not stoop. I don't want to play something every other organist or sub gives them on Sundays. I am, after all, a classicist with some rather recalcitrant romantic leanings. I'm not generally taken in by the treacly or whimsical, particularly with my strongly stated views on the importance of worship with strong music.   I am aware of Lorenz, and own a couple books from my beginning organ days, so would have had no necessity to ask for them. While they appeal to many, and I don't look down my nose at them by any means, that's just not what I'm looking for. If you read my posts and are aware of my political woes, you have already realized that I don't run with a pack.   Thanks for the other fine suggestions. John, your book sounds very interesting to me, and I don't think I've heard of that Guilmant before.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of John Foss   On a recent outing to Salonika Klaidi bought me back a book of organ music as as present - a rare find in Greece. It had at least one piece of more than ephemeral interest in it, the "Choral et Variations on Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan" by Guilmant. It also has several short, lively pieces by composers such as Marcel Courtonne (Grand Choeur), and five pieces by Leon Boellmann, 2 offertoires, 2 Sorties and 1 Grand sortie. It is titled "Vox Humana" and is published by Barenreiter, BA 8231 They are in many cases manuals only, or a fairly rudimentary pedal part, and do not present many problems of technique. I have been using them for beginners. Perhaps these might be of use? I expect I will be accused of musical snobbery, but Cesar Franck worked hard to free the french organ loft of trivia, such as "orages" designed merely to tickle the ear! Now, come on, Glenda, try and give them something decent that they will enjoy, but don't pander to the lowest common denominator!        
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: "Margo Dillard" <dillardm@airmail.net> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 08:03:42 -0500   there is a 3 volume set called "Pipe Dusters" - all loud, all fast, all flashy, all easy to put together in only a week - and very few stop changes, if any, needed. As the title says - just pull out full organ and go. My church has liked every one I have played - and my choir LOVES the cover picture (organ with bats and bugs and dust flying out of all the pipes. They have even put out an additional volume for organs without pedals - or organists without feet ;-)   Glenda wrote: > Inasmuch as I am called on to help out low-brow Methodists about once or > twice every other month, I am looking for flashy, medium difficulty, > short (3-4 minute) postludes that do not require lots of stop changes > (the small tracker with no pistons and heavy drawknobs). > > Thanks for your suggestions. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     -- Dr. Margo Dillard Organist, FUMC, Lewisville, TX Musical Feast Choral Society Dillard Piano & Organ Studio    
(back) Subject: Taco Bell Cannon From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 09:15:21 -0400   Hi, folks -   Same wedding, different piece.   The bride wants the Pachelbel Canon in D for the procession of the wedding = party. What do you think? Is it appropriate? If so, how do you handle it, tempo = and registration-wise?   And yes, I'm going to talk her out of using Queen of Sheba for the bridal processional. It does make a good recessional/postlude, and perhaps I'll = attempt to talk her into that. I also like the alternate title of "Sinfonia" = (from Solomon). Thanks to all for your help with the Queen.   And with Taco Belle.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: RE: Flashy short postludes? From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 06:16:31 -0700 (PDT)     Hi Glenda   A nice book I have is Twelve Miniatures for Organ by Noel Rawsthorne.   Published by Mayhew, dist. by MelBay. All on 3 staves most are actually = very nice.   Try them.   Desiree'       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: Taco Bell Cannon From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 08:23:35 -0500   Hi! Funny enough- there is an ACTUAL piece of music called Taco Bell Cannon. At All Saints Episcopal Church in Chicago, a parish where I did a ministry internship last year, which is a very young parish, they sing this periodically at their annual meeting to provide a little diversion in the midst of all the serious business. It is indeed a canon that speaks of what makes up a taco!!!! The parish is a very intersting place that is hard to describe- but its WONDERFUL. If anyone is interested, take a look at http://www.allsaintschicago.org Trust me, you've NEVER seen a church like this one!     Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324      
(back) Subject: Re: Taco Bell Cannon From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 08:23:48 -0400   I hate playing this piece on organ... I think the original string=20 version allows you to hear the actual canon because of the independence=20=   of the string lines weaving through. On organ, it all flattens out to=20=   a big bore, no matter how much I try to solo out or vary the tone=20 colors. Brides tend to want it, though, and of course I have played=20 it. I just think that a processional is just that... it means a=20 certain pomp and majesty, not a dreamy slush. If I do play it, I tend=20=   to take a pretty sprightly tempo, which can catch you by surprise when=20=   the sixteenth notes start. Chuck Peery St. Louis On Oct 14, 2004, at 9:15 AM, Shirley wrote:   > Hi, folks - > > > Same wedding, different piece. > > > The bride wants the Pachelbel Canon in D for the procession of the=20 > wedding party. What do you think?=A0 Is it appropriate?=A0 If so, how = do=20 > you handle it, tempo and registration-wise? > > > And yes, I'm going to talk her out of using Queen of Sheba for the=20 > bridal processional.=A0 It does make a good recessional/postlude, and=20=   > perhaps I'll attempt to talk her into that.=A0 I also like the = alternate=20 > title of "Sinfonia"=A0 (from Solomon). Thanks to all for your help = with=20 > the Queen. > > > And with Taco Belle. > > > --Shirley    
(back) Subject: First U. Lutheran Hammond, IN 10/17 From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 08:29:53 -0500   Hi! Here's my music list for Sunday:   Liturgy- LBW Setting 1 with "This is the Feast" and "Let the Vineyards"   Prelude- "O That I Had a Thousand Voices" Paul Manz   Processionsal Hymn- same as above- tune: O DASS ICH TAUSEND ZUNGEN HATTE intro by Paul Manz   Hymn of the Day- LBW 440 "Christians, While on Earth Abiding" (WERDE MUNTER) Choral Prelude by Percy Whitlock   Communion- WOV 746 "Day by Day" WOV 772 "O Lord, Hear My Prayer" (Taize) LBW 441 "Eternal Spirit of the Living Christ" (ADORO TE DEVOTE)   Recessional- LBW 294 "My Hope Is Built on Nothing Less" (MELITA)   Postlude- "Pasticcio" Jean Langlais   Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324      
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 09:41:53 -0400   Margo, who is the publisher of these? Tnx.   --Shirley   On 14 Oct 2004 at 8:03, Margo Dillard expounded:   > there is a 3 volume set called "Pipe Dusters" - all loud, all fast, > all flashy, all easy to put together in only a week - and very few > stop changes, if any, needed. As the title says - just pull out full > organ and go. My church has liked every one I have played    
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 06:59:42 -0700 (PDT)   Another set from Melbay/Mayhew is Twelve Fanfares for organ by Noel = Rawasthorne. Like the Twelve Miniatures, there are some that are written = better than others, in my opinion. But, the previous book I mention, = Twelve Miniatures, you may like more. While I don't own any, the Pipe Dusters books do have some useful pieces. FWIW TDH       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: Bud and Burgie are moving From: "Dr. Amy Fleming" <docamy@alltel.net> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 09:06:38 -0500   Bud - I understand your reasons for wanting to stay in the area. It is fortunate that you gave good friends helping you there. Good luck on your move. Sounds like it will be for the best. Amy    
(back) Subject: Re: Bud and Burgie are moving From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 07:16:04 -0700 (PDT)   Hi Bud While some of us on the list have had things to say, some good and some = not, Im glad you are landing on your feet. I know, sometimes it seems like = nothing will happen, but Letting Go and Letting God is how I have grown, = especially lately. I know destitute times, and they can really be = frightening. Hope things continue to balance out. FWIW TDH         From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: RE: Flashy short postludes? From: "Henry Glass" <henry@melbay.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 09:27:40 -0500   The Twelve Fanfares for organ have been cancelled. However, the Twelve Miniatures have been combined with twenty-four other pieces by Rawsthorne. The 36 MINIATURES volume is now 1400357. Melbay has 24 of them in stock. Call 1-800-8Melbay for a quick order. It is a great collection!   =20   ________________________________   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of T.Desiree' Hines Sent: Thursday, October 14, 2004 9:00 AM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes?   =20   Another set from Melbay/Mayhew is Twelve Fanfares for organ by Noel Rawasthorne. Like the Twelve Miniatures, there are some that are written better than others, in my opinion. But, the previous book I mention, Twelve Miniatures, you may like more.=20   While I don't own any, the Pipe Dusters books do have some useful pieces.=20   =20   FWIW   TDH           From Desiree'=20 T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around=20 http://mail.yahoo.com=20    
(back) Subject: vester catalog From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 10:38:41 EDT   strange question here... but does ANYBODY happen to have a copy of one of =   the last organ music catalogs put out by vester music in nashville before = they went out of business in the late 1990s? anybody at all? please???   scot  
(back) Subject: RE: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" From: "Henry Glass" <henry@melbay.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 10:02:29 -0500   Music for the Bride is 96081. Order @ 1-800-8melbay.   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Bruce Miles Sent: Tuesday, October 12, 2004 4:29 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba"   Glenda.   It's in the collection ' Music for the Bride' (Pub Kevin Mayhew) with 32   other must have pieces. 'The Noel Rawsthorne's spiffing Fanfare for the=20 Bride' is one.   HTH Bruce Miles     website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html ----- Original Message -----=20 From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, October 12, 2004 8:31 PM Subject: RE: "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba"     > There is a version in one of the Oxford books - if no one else on the > list can provide it, please e-mail me and I can find it. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > >=20   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: RE: Flashy short postludes? From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 13:51:27 -0400   Several come to mind-- effective, not too difficult, and good music that = I think congregations appreciate:   Carillon [or Carillon de Longpont] by Louis Vierne, from his 24 pieces = en style libre, v.2 (The last piece in this volume, Postlude, isn't bad, either)   Carillon, by Herbert Murrill. My copy dates from the 1960s as sheet = music from Oxford Univ. Press. I hope it's still available!   The three-volume facsimile edition of John Stanley's voluntaries (Oxford = U. Pr.) contains quite a few trumpet tunes that should work nicely if = you have a good solo trumpet stop.   Novello publishes (or published in the 1960s) a slim red book of some = six fanfares by various composers. Those by Arthur Wills and Tony = Hewitt-Jones are my favorites and make great short postludes. Probably = the others would, as well. Even though the Wills fanfare is four pages, = it's only about two minutes long as written. This is not because it's = difficult, but because these are small pages! But near the bottom of = the third page is a cadence that lends itself very well to repeating the = piece from the beginning before going on to the last page. I also think = that it only gains in grandeur from a somewhat slower tempo than marked: = the bold, rather Langlaisian harmonies can benefit from having more time = to sink into the ear. Although it qualifies as a fanfare by its texture, = it could work on a single manual with no reeds at all if necessary.=20   This reminds me of "Festival Voluntary", op. 87, by Flor Peeters, which = is also just what I think you're looking for. This is the first piece = in Oxford University Press's green "Album of Praise". If it's too = short, insert a repeat sign near the end. I hope that this wouldn't = make the composer turn in his grave. =20   And speaking of Langlaisian English organ music, we mustn't forget = Nicholas Jackson. = http://www.pujanke.hr/Dioklecijan/More%20on%20Jackson.html. The toccata = from "Four Images" is a quite an exciting piece, about 3 minutes long, = in a style strongly reminiscent of Langlais. As the web page explains, = the suite takes inspiration from, and is partly conceived for use with, = his "Mass for a Saint's Day", a short English BCP Communion setting = complete with Creed (published by Boosey & Hawkes). Its colorful, = dramatic, and mystical style is very French, without being difficult for = a choir unless they're just allergic to anything "modern :-(" The = independent and resourceful organ accompaniment makes it. Liturgical = revisionism should simply not be allowed to eclipse music of this = caliber! Jackson dedicated the organ suite to the French girl who would = become his wife, and he premiered it at the very place he had met her a = year earlier: Notre-Dame, Paris.   My present congregation is as appreciative of postludes as any for whom = I've ever played. I'm very fortunate in that respect. Quite a few of = them, including the rector, will stay and listen. His example is = probably the greatest influence in others' doing likewise.   In the more common (ah, let's go ahead and use the synonym "vulgar") = situation where this is not the case, and most people just chatter away, = I'd have to agree with Bud and question whether exquisitely fine = repertoire is usually appropriate. Wouldn't this be casting pearls = before swine? This is the time for music conceived in bold, broad = brushstrokes, whose effect does not depend so much on easily obscured = details. I think all of the above qualify while retaining artistic = integrity and interest.    
(back) Subject: RE: Taco Bell Cannon From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 17:04:48 -0400   Charles Peery writes:   > I hate playing this piece on organ... I think the original string=20 version allows you to hear the actual canon because of the independence =   of the string lines weaving through. On organ, it all flattens out to =   a big bore, no matter how much I try to solo out or vary the tone=20 colors. Brides tend to want it, though, and of course I have played=20 it. I just think that a processional is just that... it means a=20 certain pomp and majesty, not a dreamy slush.=20   I agree with you about the canon's not being effective organ music (even = if it's more than piffle in the original). I'd hardly put it on my = white list. I would warn any bride requesting it that it's string music = that just doesn't work very well on the organ.   However, compared to some things that brides and their mothers want, = it's at least blessedly innocuous and non-abusive. Some very nice = people, I hope, feel that being dreamy and slushy is better than being = pompous. (According to some collegial teasing I was treated to just = today, I'm pretty dreamy if not slushy whether I like it or not :-) =20   Inasmuch as the whole idea of a "bridal procession", however customary = it has become, remains a mere novelty with no liturgical warrant, how = can we declare with any authority what its spirit should be?   Paul Emmons    
(back) Subject: Re: vester catalog From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 18:31:16 EDT   I don't have a copy of a Vester, but last year, I saw Jim at one of the dedicatory concerts at Christ Church Cathedral, downtown Nashville. He's = now an employee of Brodt Music in Charlotte.   Yours,   Darryl  
(back) Subject: Speaking of Short Postludes From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 18:32:13 EDT   Speaking of short, flashy Postludes, here is the music for 10/17 at St. John's, Bowdoin Street:   Prelude: "Lento" from "Four Miniatures for Organ" --William Harris Anthem at the Offertory: "Jesu, the very thought of thee" --Bairstow Communion Motet: "O Quam Suavis"--Titcomb Postlude: "Fanfare" from "Four Miniatures for Organ" --William Harris   Couldn't resist. My "Fanfare" makes quite a bitonal impression, though = still appropriate for church. It runs about 2 minutes and requires few changes = of registration.   Shamlessly self-promoting my own compositions,   Bill H SJE, Boston.  
(back) Subject: RE: Taco Bell Cannon From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2004 19:07:15 -0400       On 14 Oct 2004 at 17:04, Emmons, Paul expounded:   > Inasmuch as the whole idea of a "bridal procession", however customary > it has become, remains a mere novelty with no liturgical warrant, how > can we declare with any authority what its spirit should be?     Indeed, Paul. In weddings and funerals (and baptisms too, actually), = there is a lot of culture that's brought in as well. If I had my way, there would be = much more liturgy and much less culture.   --Shirley