PipeChat Digest #4829 - Saturday, October 16, 2004
 
Re: PipeChat Digest #4827 - 10/15/04
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
John's post about my post; formerly Short lively pieces for voluntaries
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Largest repertoire?
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Largeat repertoire?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
"Learning" to play the piano
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Business is really taking off!
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Taco Bell Canon
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Taco Bell Canon
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
Re: Taco Bell Canon
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Taco Bell Canon
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Pachelbel canon
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Taco Bell Canon
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: your opinion
  by "Bernadette Wagner" <musicalgrl90@yahoo.com>
Re: Taco Bell Canon
  by <RVScara@aol.com>
Re: Business is really taking off!
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Largest repertoire?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Pachelbel canon
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
A Saturday in Florala
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: A Saturday in Florala
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4827 - 10/15/04 From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 05:20:01 -0500   For info on the Katarina Church, Stockholm Van den Heuvel organ : http://vandenheuvel-orgelbouw.nl/instruments/katarina/Frameset_katarina.htm=     Cheers,   Tim   ----- Original Message ----- From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, October 16, 2004 3:47 AM Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #4827 - 10/15/04     > This week's additions to http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ = include > a > virtuoso performance of Gigout's Toccata by David M Patrick on the Van = den > Heuvel organ in Katarina Church, Stockholm      
(back) Subject: John's post about my post; formerly Short lively pieces for voluntaries From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 07:53:34 -0500   I tried to send this to you privately, John, but it kept coming back.   I didn't understand your post replying. I wasn't saying or implying anything untoward toward you (how's that for English?). I was agreeing with you that I am not into the vulgarly flashy. I never mean to offend in any way, so hope I did not.   Were you talking about "treacly" or "whimsical", perhaps?   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (with 8 cats plus two wild males who have come up and decided to make this their home - I'm conducting daily lessons in kitty etiquette)     From: John Foss [mailto:harkat@kat.forthnet.gr] Sent: Friday, October 15, 2004 2:48 PM   Oh Glenda, of course I read your posts - How else could I reply to them! I think we are both cat lovers! I think it might be a question of language. American and English may have much in common, but they are not the same. I looked the word up in my Oxford Dictionary - it comes up with "attractive in a bright way but not of good quality or in good taste." I realise, of course, that in American it may have a totally different connotation, e.g "bright and lively and of great cultural value." Perhaps someone has a Webster's to hand?        
(back) Subject: Re: Largest repertoire? From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 10:13:14 EDT   In a message dated 10/15/04 9:18:13 PM Pacific Daylight Time, cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk writes:   > So why don't people listen more, and why isn't organ music heard on the > air-waves more? >   100 years ago when 12,000-seat auditoriums were packed and people were = turned away from hearing lemare, it was a different world. some cities did not = have orchestras, and the only way some people could hear orchestral music was = from a transcription. there were no radios, no tvs, people still played instruments and sang for each other in homes. there were no films with = garbo, swanson, taylor, or newman showing in the neighborhood theater. there was no i = love lucy, gilligan's island, all in the family, south park, or friends showing = 12 times a day on cable. there was no cable. there was no internet, no chat =   rooms, no mail lists like this one.   in other words, there were fewer distractions so attendance was much = higher, so there was much more exposure to organ music than there is now. back = then, there were very few things more impressive than a pipe organ played by a master. now the public is easily swayed by the lord of the rings (a = masterpiece) as well as dumb and dumber (not a masterpiece).   all we can do is our part to keep our world alive and attract new blood. well-programmed recitals help, as opposed to an hour of [composer's name = here].   ok, breakfast is ready, so i'm off my soapbox.   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: Largeat repertoire? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 10:21:38 -0400   On 10/16/04 12:12 AM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > So why don't people listen more, and why isn't organ music heard on the > air-waves more? >=20 In the USA, at least, it's a matter of (im?)pure economics. Radio programming/broadcasting is a commercial enterprise. What causes the largest number of radio sets to be =B3on=B2 is not music for the refined tastes of the few, but music for the masses: Grieg, Smetana, etc., over and over and over again. People listen; the station=B9s sales department sells commercial time, and everybody gets paid more.   NON-commercial stations, including university stations, are smaller. They can do =B3better=B2 things, but not all day and all night. So we have to go ou= t and buy the CDs, and support Organs and Organists Online, etc. It=B9s the price we pay for =B3knowing better.=B2   Alan  
(back) Subject: "Learning" to play the piano From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 10:03:28 -0500   Interesting discussion on readiness to learn certain pieces. A very = capable piano teacher in our area taught a young girl the basics for a year or so, but the girl wasn't interested.   Fast forward six or eight years and the girl was in a beauty pageant with = a "talent section." What do talented beauties do if they don't have a = public performance talent? This girl contacted her old piano teacher and ask for help in learning ONE song. They spent an entire summer working measure by measure on an appropriate concert piece. The girl learned it and played = it flawlessly (though probably not very artistically) for the pageant. Her entire repertoire is that one song. I doubt if she could play Chopsticks!   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: Business is really taking off! From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 12:03:56 -0500   Oh, that makes sense! I've actually never heard it abbreviated that way. = I love theatre organs... they are loaded with BTU's. ;-)   Andy   On Fri, 15 Oct 2004 10:41:38 EDT, Myosotis51 wrote > Hello andy@ablorgans.com, > > In reference to your comment: > Cool article and a brilliant idea! If someone would do a similar > thing for wooden sailboats, I'd totally be a customer. Perhaps > someone should do it for pipe organs. But what's a TO? > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ > > Theatre Organ. > > Victoria, watching Andy smack himself on the forehead :-) > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Taco Bell Canon From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 12:32:09 -0500   I agree that the Canon in D is dreadfully sappy... the Kenny G of = classical music. Awful. But every time we refuse to play it for a bride, or play = it badly so they won't want it anymore (I've heard of people doing this with hymns like "in the garden") its a big step backward for the organ and good =   music, because it confirms in people's minds what they suspected all along... that the organ is for the elite few.   Play it, and play it creatively and well! Its sappy, so go with that and make it sappy! Use those tremolos and vox humanas! Strings galore! = Muddy registrations behind closed boxes! Whatever it takes! They'll like it, = and then they'll stay to hear the Franck.   Andy     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Taco Bell Canon From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 13:50:29 -0400       On 16 Oct 2004 at 12:32, Andy Lawrence expounded: > Play it, and play it creatively and well!   Indeed. We as organists hear all of the weddings, play all of the = weddings. We've been to more weddings than anyone else sitting in the congregation. For = the bride, there is only *one* wedding of any significance, and that's hers. We need = to make each wedding fresh and vibrant, for each one is unique.   --Shirley    
(back) Subject: Re: Taco Bell Canon From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 01:58:51 +0800     While I agree that the Canon is "sappy," I don't think it is "awful"; Just = over-played. It makes for good background/meditation music. (Subjective opi= nion)   By request, the Canon is going to be my offertory piece tomorrow. (Yo Quero= !) -- I love it when a member of the congregation has enough interest in th= e music to make a request like this.     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: Taco Bell Canon Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 12:32:09 -0500   >=20 > I agree that the Canon in D is dreadfully sappy... the Kenny G of classic= al=20 > music. Awful. But every time we refuse to play it for a bride, or play = it=20 > badly so they won't want it anymore (I've heard of people doing this with= =20 > hymns like "in the garden") its a big step backward for the organ and goo= d=20 > music, because it confirms in people's minds what they suspected all=20 > along... that the organ is for the elite few. >=20 > Play it, and play it creatively and well! Its sappy, so go with that and= =20 > make it sappy! Use those tremolos and vox humanas! Strings galore! Mud= dy=20 > registrations behind closed boxes! Whatever it takes! They'll like it, = and=20 > then they'll stay to hear the Franck. >=20 > Andy   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: Taco Bell Canon From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 13:32:16 -0500   Yay for you! thanks for doing that. it makes a big difference when we = are willing to play what they want once in a while... especially when we do personal requests. Like I said, they'll be more likely to listen to the meatier music too as a result   Andy   On Sun, 17 Oct 2004 01:58:51 +0800, Jan Nijhuis wrote > While I agree that the Canon is "sappy," I don't think it is > "awful"; Just over-played. It makes for good background/meditation > music. (Subjective opinion) > > By request, the Canon is going to be my offertory piece tomorrow. > (Yo Quero!) -- I love it when a member of the congregation has > enough interest in the music to make a request like this. > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: Taco Bell Canon > Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 12:32:09 -0500 > > > > > I agree that the Canon in D is dreadfully sappy... the Kenny G of classical > > music. Awful. But every time we refuse to play it for a bride, or = play it > > badly so they won't want it anymore (I've heard of people doing this with > > hymns like "in the garden") its a big step backward for the organ and good > > music, because it confirms in people's minds what they suspected all > > along... that the organ is for the elite few. > > > > Play it, and play it creatively and well! Its sappy, so go with that and > > make it sappy! Use those tremolos and vox humanas! Strings galore! Muddy > > registrations behind closed boxes! Whatever it takes! They'll like = it, and > > then they'll stay to hear the Franck. > > > > Andy > > -- > Jan Nijhuis > nijhuis@email.com > > -- > ___________________________________________________________ > Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com > http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related > topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Pachelbel canon From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 14:52:27 -0400   Hi all,   I'm pondering the abuse that's been heaped on poor Mr. Pachelbel's "Canon" in the past few days and trying to figure out where it comes from. If one objects to transcriptions, then lots of the music commonly used for weddings is also off limits. If one takes into account a "listenability" factor, then the "Canon" is a whole lot more listenable than much of the music we organists play. If one thinks it's played too often, then we'd best examine other music we play at weddings, especially if we play a lot of weddings.   Realizing that I hereby brand myself as a low-brow anti-intellectual (oh well), I will offer a word of support for Pachelbel's "Canon." If one takes the time to work through S. Drummond Wolff's transcription (the best of the several versions I own, in my opinion), learning it carefully, attending to detail, and registrating with creativity, this can be a rather effective piece of music which is sure to be liked by listeners (heaven forbid!).   And now, back into my corner to await the furies of all who think I must be crazy.   Steve Best in Utica, NY    
(back) Subject: Re: Taco Bell Canon From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 15:02:17 -0400   On 10/16/04 1:32 PM, "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> wrote:   > They'll like it, and then they'll stay to hear the Franck.   Oh, but I was hoping for the "Largo" from Xerxes.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: your opinion From: "Bernadette Wagner" <musicalgrl90@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 12:39:46 -0700 (PDT)   coolio. YANKEES ALL THE WAY!!!!!   Karl Moyer <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> wrote:I=92d never =93diss=94 = your teacher for his decision to teach you the Franck Chorale in a.   Now, as to you support for the Yankees, that=92s quite another matter. = This deserves serious therapy! :-)   GO JAMIE MOYER!! GO MARINERS!! (Well, perhaps next year.)   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   On 10/15/04 1:07 PM, "Bernadette Wagner" <musicalgrl90@yahoo.com> wrote:   Ok. Do any of the list members think it is weird that a 14 year old is = learning Franck's Chorale in A Minor? My teacher thinks I can do it, it's = just that a few people were all, "YOU ARE 14!!! YOU SHOULDNT BE LEARNING = IT THIS EARLY!!!" and i just wanted other people's opinion. and don't diss = my teacher cuz hes a member of pipechat.   GO YANKEES!!!!!   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: Taco Bell Canon From: <RVScara@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 16:36:37 EDT   I play it whenever they ask for it. We have a 3 manual digital with a PR-300 box, MIDI on all manuals, SW Melody and CH Melody couplers to GT. = Use Strings, Voce Humana and Gemshorn on GT. Melody the Oboe and Flute 4' = with Trem from SW, and the Violin or Viola with Echo Celeste from CH and it can = sound like a 3 - 4 piece ensemble playing. It may not be a typical organ sound, = but it's me playing and I take my $150 with no regrets. Better then them = hiring a string ensemble in lieu of an organist.    
(back) Subject: Re: Business is really taking off! From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 16:23:01 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Hearing that Wicks now make areoplanes, one assumes that the Solos will be prepared for.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Declare Yourself - Register online to vote today! http://vote.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Largest repertoire? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 16:36:31 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Alan's response to my question is, of course, absolutely right. It's a question of people giving other people what they "think" they should hear.   The point about broadcasting time is equally valid, and one of the worst aspects of the Greg Dyke mentality, when he took over as controller of the BBC, was to court popularity and "ratings." I feel sure that this contributed to a dramatic reduction in early music, organ music and harpsichord music heard on Radio 3 here in the UK.   Well of course, if people only listen to radio or TV, then they become victims to the whims of programme planners, and perpetuate the status quo of "the top 100 favourites."   In spite of commercial pressures, BBC Radio 3 remains unique in the world, where all sorts of obscure music is pursued with vigour....hence my recent rant about Mongolian "throat singing," which I heard on Radio 3.   Mentioning "Organs and Organists on-line," I think this is the most wonderful creation, for with that particular web site, we have real, living art and intercourse. If "Organs and Organists on-line" had a seperate section for improvisation, it would also be a valuable archive in years to come....shades of Tournemire and Durufle.   It is very exciting to hear regular contributors to pipechat play the organ, and to hear some superb performances from people of whom one may not have heard previously. I would single out the Timothy Grenz performances of Bach, and the superb Fantasia & Fugue in C Minor (Bach) by Chris Howeter as fine examples. To hear the latest digital organs is also very, very interesting....Trinity NY being especially fascinating. Then we come across not one, or two, but FOUR young organists from Norway; one of whom is a composer! And what a wonderful showcase for young organists O & O O L is. Even more fascinating, will be to chart their musical development on-line.   At long last, it seems that the internet is fulfilling its promise, for it cannot be long before we can hear live music and vision.....maybe on-line teaching or recital audiences....the sky is the limit.   Of perhaps equal importance, is the opportunity to archive the sound of organs threatened by church closures etc.   It's all very exciting, and I personally feel very grateful to Tim Grenz and John Foss, as I sit here listening to downloaded files and tapping away on the computer.   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK   --- Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote:     > What causes the > largest number of radio sets to be =B3on=B2 > is .....music for the masses......   > So we have to go out > and buy the CDs, and support Organs and Organists > Online, etc.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/maildemo  
(back) Subject: Re: Pachelbel canon From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 16:52:16 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   "Anti intellectual"....a man after my own art!   "Familiarity breeds contempt" springs to mind.   When I am asked to play Mr Pachebel's "Canon," I always smile to myself. Within the organ repertoire is that truly beautiful "Ciacona" in F-minor by the same composer.....IMHO, streets ahead of the "canon."   Regards,     Colin Mitchell UK     --- Stephen Best <stevebest@usadatanet.net> wrote:     > I'm pondering the abuse that's been heaped on poor > Mr. Pachelbel's > "Canon" in the past few days   > Realizing that I hereby brand myself as a low-brow > anti-intellectual (oh > well), I will offer a word of support for > Pachelbel's "Canon       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: A Saturday in Florala From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 20:47:36 -0500   A Saturday in Florala   Yes, there is a town by that name, right on the Florida-Alabama state line and next door to another village named Paxton on the Florida side. There is a pretty lake and picnic area, around which the north end is nestled the town of Florala.   Many people, including those on the list, are unaware that there is a sliver of Florida protecting most of Alabama from the Gulf of Mexico. DeFuniak Springs lies 20 miles south of the Alabama state line, and 30 miles or less from the Gulf of Mexico. Many times I've had people e-mail me or call, saying, "I'm going to be at Disney World/Tampa/Miami next week - why don't we do lunch?" Sure, it's only roughly 400 more miles. Come up any time. It's closer for me to drive to New Orleans, Birmingham, Chattanooga or Atlanta than to Central Florida.   I digress. A friend called and asked if I would help out with a Pedals, Pipes and Pizza event (not sure if the terms are in the right order). A planning meeting was scheduled this morning. So I drove the hazardous 20 miles up a heavily traveled 2-lane kamikaze lane to Florala. It was a gorgeous day, and the weather was comfortable. Hay and cotton were being harvested in the fields as I drove past.   Five area organists met to plan the event, scheduled for the first Saturday in November. It had already been decided that the organs at the First Baptist and First Presbyterian Churches (almost across the street from each other) would be used. I had never visited the churches and knew nothing about the instruments. Curiosity was a factor in my decision to participate.   First Baptist Church sits on top of a hill, and is a charming brick building of about 1920s vintage. In fact, the minister who built the church was an architect, and bought the organ for the church. It is a tiny Moller of about 10 independent ranks, and some borrowing. The console is wedged tightly into a crevice. In fact, I bumped my knees trying to slide in, and knew my towering organ instructor would never fit on this bench. The instrument is unremarkable, but when one of my friends started playing and I was free to roam the room it made some nice sounds. The squarish room is quite charming, with the pulpit in a corner and the pews in a semi-circle around it. The windows and architectural details are lovely. The chamber is in a spacious loft room above the pulpit area, and there is plenty of room to add ranks. However, it is probably pretty much just as it was installed, and there are no couplers. I did not jot down the stoplist, but will of course be visiting again soon.   My friend was drafted to play the "King of Insruments" ditty for narration by another during the event, and plans for the order of events, publicity (there are a plethora of towns within a 30-mile radius: Crestview, Baker, Holt, Milligan, Laurel Hill, Escambia Farms, Andalusia, Lockhart, Opp, Samson/Geneva, DeFuniak Springs, Mossy Head - do any of those ring a bell?), snacks, and other logistics were discussed. Then we went to a restaurant specializing in a buffet of Southern cuisine, before going on to the Presbyterian church.   This looked every inch the Presbyterian church, rather stark with whitish walls and dark wood trim. This church was built in the 1020s also, and the church had corresponded with both the Pilcher and Hinners companies for an organ. Then the depression hit. The church reduced its sanctuary size and forewent an organ. I was not clear on when the current instrument was installed, but know that it is undergoing major work right now by David Finch, area builder, technician and Austin rep for the area and residing in that town. The current pipes are 7 ranks of Hilgren Lane, and the console is an Austin. It is definitely unfinished, but has a little more 'oomph' to it than the Baptist instrument.   One of the catalysts behind the idea to hold this program is Oliver Finch, the son of the organ builder. He made the day supremely entertaining, and what I expected would be a couple-hour commitment ended up an all-day organ crawl and gab fest. He ended up taking me to his parents' house to see his 1960s Allen analog instrument in his mother's living room, along with the grand piano. There was no room for the speakers, so they graced the front bedroom. I gained a new appreciation for her having to spend a lifetime with two organ fanatics. We also went by the Lutheran church to see the Ahlborn-Galanti, and the Methodist Hammond, but they were both locked up.   So it was a good day. The hay is cut, the cotton is on its way to the gin, the children are put to bed. Let us hope the old adage comes true - if you feed them pizza, they will come, they will play, they will become organists. Or something like that.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: A Saturday in Florala From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 21:52:13 EDT   glenda, your e-mails make me miss the south.   scot in spokane