PipeChat Digest #4830 - Sunday, October 17, 2004
 
Re: A Saturday in Florala
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Subject: Re: Largest repertoire?
  by <hunts@senet.com.au>
Re: Your opinion
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
RE: A Saturday in Florala
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Your opinion
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: A Saturday in Florala From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 22:15:26 -0400   At 09:47 PM 10/16/2004, Glenda wrote: >A Saturday in Florala > >Yes, there is a town by that name, right on the Florida-Alabama state >line and next door to another village named Paxton on the Florida side. >There is a pretty lake and picnic area, around which the north end is >nestled the town of Florala. <snip> >Five area organists met to plan the event, scheduled for the first >Saturday in November. It had already been decided that the organs at >the First Baptist and First Presbyterian Churches (almost across the >street from each other) would be used. I had never visited the churches >and knew nothing about the instruments. Curiosity was a factor in my >decision to participate. > >First Baptist Church sits on top of a hill, and is a charming brick >building of about 1920s vintage. In fact, the minister who built the >church was an architect, and bought the organ for the church. It is a >tiny Moller of about 10 independent ranks, and some borrowing. The >console is wedged tightly into a crevice. In fact, I bumped my knees >trying to slide in, and knew my towering organ instructor would never >fit on this bench. The instrument is unremarkable, but when one of my >friends started playing and I was free to roam the room it made some >nice sounds. The squarish room is quite charming, with the pulpit in a >corner and the pews in a semi-circle around it. The windows and >architectural details are lovely. The chamber is in a spacious loft >room above the pulpit area, and there is plenty of room to add ranks. >However, it is probably pretty much just as it was installed, and there >are no couplers. I did not jot down the stoplist, but will of course be >visiting again soon. > >My friend was drafted to play the "King of Insruments" ditty for >narration by another during the event, and plans for the order of >events, publicity (there are a plethora of towns within a 30-mile >radius: Crestview, Baker, Holt, Milligan, Laurel Hill, Escambia Farms, >Andalusia, Lockhart, Opp, Samson/Geneva, DeFuniak Springs, Mossy Head - >do any of those ring a bell?), snacks, and other logistics were >discussed. Then we went to a restaurant specializing in a buffet of >Southern cuisine, before going on to the Presbyterian church. > >This looked every inch the Presbyterian church, rather stark with >whitish walls and dark wood trim. This church was built in the 1020s >also, and the church had corresponded with both the Pilcher and Hinners >companies for an organ. Then the depression hit. The church reduced >its sanctuary size and forewent an organ.   Glenda,   Not only does Texas like to boast about it having the "Biggest" of everything, but now we hear that Florida has the "Oldest" Church on the Continent!   Did the Presbie's exist as long ago as 1020? Oh well, I suppose that they =   must have!   Cheers,   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: Subject: Re: Largest repertoire? From: <hunts@senet.com.au> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 14:19:03 +1100   Just a note to point out that I don't think Radio 3 is quite unique in the = world - ABC Classic FM, the Australian public national fine music station, = does a very good job of broadcasting live recitals from around the country = and around the world; broadcasting new music and 20th Century repertoire = regularly, and supporting talented Australian performers and composers, as = well as all the international greats. I suppose the peak hour "drive" = programs have become a bit more "populist" recently with more and more = "crossover" repertoire, but the station has a solid core of good = broadcasting, and great educational programs such as Graham Abbotts "Keys = to Music" (which can be heard online at www.abc.net.au/classic   There may be other great classical stations out there around the world = similar to ABC Classic and Radio 3 that aren't so subject to the whims and = vagaries of ratings....??   Regards, Anthony   This message was sent through MyMail http://www.mymail.com.au      
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinion From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 23:23:31 EDT   If you are a good pianist, then Franck's a minor Choral is a wonderful = piece to learn. The writing is very pianistic, with all those arpeggios and eight note = chords. Good luck! It was my first Franck work (I learned it when I was 16) and I still perform it regularly.   Justin Hartz  
(back) Subject: RE: A Saturday in Florala From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 22:48:09 -0500   Yes, you've never heard of this church? Built on the ruins of a Norman kitty columbarium, which was burnt, soon after its creation, by a pack of medieval coyotes. That organ, also destroyed, was tubular pneumatic. And yes, there were Presbyterians before Calvin, among the native tribes here. And there were once giant pleicostomi swimming in Lake Jackson, much praised for their beauty and revered as gods.   But, Bob, this is Alabama being described.   And here I thought you enjoyed suspending disbelief!   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Bob Conway > >This looked every inch the Presbyterian church, rather stark with >whitish walls and dark wood trim. This church was built in the 1020s >also, and the church had corresponded with both the Pilcher and Hinners >companies for an organ. Then the depression hit. The church reduced >its sanctuary size and forewent an organ.   Glenda,   Not only does Texas like to boast about it having the "Biggest" of everything, but now we hear that Florida has the "Oldest" Church on the Continent!        
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinion From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 00:22:23 -0500   To whoever mentioned the hitchdown swell pedal on Frank's organ: good point, and well taken and appreciated. In fact, I think the point is very =   important, and very interesting to me because I did not know that. = However, I'd like to point out (I'm sure you already knew this) that it is possible =   to have smooth crescendos and diminuendos with a hitchdown pedal... as = long as the right foot is free. (Which obviously is not always the case).   I have never done this but since I am a strong believer in registrants, = I've considered having a registrant operate a hitchdown pedal for me (in order = to simulate a balanced pedal), or even for a balanced pedal that is too far = to the right, in which case the helper could operate it without interfering with my pedaling. Team effort organ playing is fun!   This has nothing to do with Franck, of course, at least not that I know of. :)   Andy     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com