PipeChat Digest #4831 - Sunday, October 17, 2004
 
I give up!
  by "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Subject: Re: Largest repertoire?
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Taco Bell Canon
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Fred Bock
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Fred Bock
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Subject: Re: Largest repertoire?
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Your opinion
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Glenda's post re my post about her post ...
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
cresc and decresc in French romantic music
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: I give up!
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
cresc and decresc in French romantic music
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
What I played today...
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Your opinion
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Shofar, etc.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: What I played today...
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Flashy short postludes?
  by <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com>
Re: Your opinion
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Your opinion
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Your opinion
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: What I played today...
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
 

(back) Subject: I give up! From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:34:13 +0800   I give up! PIPORG-L has removed my posting rights again. There seems to be =   some problem with the PIPORG-L server that I can't fix here, and I heard from another lister who has the same problem.   My comment on that list was that I heard the organ called a "kist of whistles" by my grandmother (died 1950 aged 94 - so she went well back = into the 19th Century). Since I posted that on PIPORG-L another poster has attributed it to John Knox. Correctly I believe. History also records that =   John Wesley banned organs from his chapels for some time but finally gave way in the face of pleas from his people and allowed the organ to be used.   There is a sect in my town who call themselves the (Independent) Church of =   Christ who claim that, as the apostles did not use musical instruments = they don't either as they worship exactly as did the apostles. Rather a strange =   claim seeing that as late as 60AD the apostles attended the Temple, considering themselves as Jews and worshipping as Jews. I once asked the pastor of this sect wehy he drove a motor car to worship and why they used =   electric light seeing the apostles used neither in their worship. He did = not reply. Bob Elms. ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Subject: Re: Largest repertoire? From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 05:47:14 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Anthony Hunt delivers heart-warming information about Australian radio.   I think the unique quality of Radio 3, as it traditionally was, is that of really in-depth programmes.   I was greatly influenced as a youngster by one series of programmes in particular, which consisted of the late Geraint Jones travelling around Europe, playing and describing some of the priceless instruments there and performing music appropriate to each. I believe that those programes are available from the "Organ historical society" on CD to this day.   Then there were those wonderful prose-tours of John Betjamin, entitled "Britain's Cathedrals and their music".....what a joy......"The train draws out from under the Malvern Hills and into a city mercilessly assaulted by heavy traffic." (Hereford)   Radio 3 can be quirky, obscure and downright perverse at times, but I wouldn't have it any other way. It is still (in spite of a slight shift towards popular programming and ratings) a very educational and uplifiting radio station, but for how much longer?   The pressure is on the BBC to liven up its act, reduce admin and costs and re-build its popularity in the UK. The economics of no advertising, public funding, several orchestras, dance bands, big bands, combo groups, resident instrumentalists and several choirs make the BBC an extreme luxury in the eyes of certain people, and there are those who are very opposed to the levy of a licence fee on listeners.   "Advertising is the way forward," seems to be the catch-word, and that frightens me to death!   Goodbye "Choral Evensong!"   Advertising means popularising and mass marketing...that is the death of limited interest groups.   Organists and Mongolian throat-singers have, at least, something in common!   It is the funding and "hands off" approach to Radio 3 which makes it what it is; a national treasure, like the late Quentin Crisp.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           --- hunts@senet.com.au wrote:   > Just a note to point out that I don't think Radio 3 > is quite unique in the world - ABC Classic FM, the > Australian public national fine music station, does > a very good job of broadcasting live recitals from > around the country and around the world     _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Declare Yourself - Register online to vote today! http://vote.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Taco Bell Canon From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 09:14:10 -0500   Hey, I'm an organist, and I play with a string ensemble, so I'm happy to = go either way. I get paid better as the non-organist, though! I did just play a wedding where we were there as a trio, along with the regular organist (an elderly nun with a taste for slush). No-one could get the bride to decide whether she wanted the pro- and re- with the organ or the trio, so it ended up being both at once. This was fine for the Trumpet Voluntary = and OK for the Masterpiece Theater Music, but the bride herself came down to the Taco Bell. Now, this is a (very) recently redone organ, about 25 pipe ranks and an equal amount of Rogers in a great acoustic, and it sound great. The Taco Bell came out on really gross MIDI strings, a sound that would work nicely for Nelson Riddle arrangements but has no relation at = all to a classical orchestral sound. I didn't mind playing with the organ, but I wish we could have played with the organ instead of the MIDI box!   Paul Opel     > I play it whenever they ask for it. We have a 3 manual digital with >a PR-300 box, MIDI on all manuals, SW Melody and CH Melody couplers to >GT. Use Strings, Voce Humana and Gemshorn on GT. Melody the Oboe and >Flute 4' with Trem from SW, and the Violin or Viola with Echo >Celeste from CH and it can sound like a 3 - 4 piece ensemble playing. It >may not be a typical organ sound, but it's me playing and I take my = $150 >with no regrets. Better then them hiring a string ensemble in lieu of = an >organist. >     http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Fred Bock From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 08:17:24 -0500   Back when I booked console time at Trinity Methodist in Tallahassee (the day Charlie hit), I had made a note to check on a piece. The organist there was playing through some music for Sunday, and while I roamed around the church listening to the organ, she was doing this lovely rendition of "Slane" or "Be thou my vision". When she finished, I asked who wrote it, and she replied, "Fred Bock."   I have a book of his piano music that I use for Baptist funerals. But other than that I've not looked at his stuff.   Well, storms and other life events intervened, and I only last week got a chance to check into this piece. I don't remember if she told me what volume, but if so, I forgot. I went on his website and he has several volumes of organ music, but the selections therein aren't listed.   Would anyone know anything about this piece - what volume? It might be good in case of subbing emergencies with the right organ and the right church. It really was nice.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Fred Bock From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 09:52:04 -0400   I have a Bock prelude on "Slane" in "The Organ Music of Fred Bock, v. 1," published by FredBock BG0889.   Steve Best   Glenda wrote:   >Back when I booked console time at Trinity Methodist in Tallahassee (the >day Charlie hit), I had made a note to check on a piece. The organist >there was playing through some music for Sunday, and while I roamed >around the church listening to the organ, she was doing this lovely >rendition of "Slane" or "Be thou my vision". When she finished, I asked >who wrote it, and she replied, "Fred Bock." > >Would anyone know anything about this piece - what volume? It might be >good in case of subbing emergencies with the right organ and the right >church. It really was nice. > >Glenda Sutton >gksjd85@direcway.com > > > > > >****************************************************************** >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Subject: Re: Largest repertoire? From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 10:24:15 -0400   At 08:47 AM 10/17/2004, Colin wrote: >Hello, >Anthony Hunt delivers heart-warming information about >Australian radio.   I am also very pleased to be able to listen to ABC Classic FM via the Internet, I found the broadcast this morning and it is a worthy addition to the list of Classical music stations on the web.   The Canadian equivalent is also to be found on the web at   www.cbc.ca   where they produce some fine programming, especially on Sunday mornings from 8.00 am to 10.00am with their programme "Choral Classics", hosted by Howard Dick, who is rather a pain to listen to, but his choice of music is =   always very good!   All in all we do quite well for classical music here in Canada, and, of course, I can always listen to CBC Radio anywhere in the house.   Bob Conway        
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinion From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 18:37:50 +0200 (CEST)   Hi Bernadette,   Go for it! If you really want to learn the piece you'll surely succeed. IMO The best way to become a better player is to always find new challenges. I'm 15 now, and I still haven't learned this piece "properly" (even though I can play it fairly well) :D   - Jarle   http://jarle.moo.no  
(back) Subject: Re: Glenda's post re my post about her post ... From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:43:17 +0300   Glenda wrote   > I didn't understand your post replying. I wasn't saying or implying > anything untoward toward you (how's that for English?). I was agreeing > with you that I am not into the vulgarly flashy. I never mean to offend > in any way, so hope I did not.   Thank you for your post, Glenda. No of course you didn't offend me! It = was purely the fact that "flashy" in "English" English has a pejorative connotation, and the thought crossed my mind that this might not be the = case in "American" English. It was just a semantic query, that's all. I do hope your cats are flourishing. I have 3 or 4 at the moment; One is = the boss cat and the other three turn up hopefully at feeding time - which is = a bit unpredictable - but one of them runs and hides whenever I look at it. = I think it's a bit shy! John Foss www.organsandorganistsonline.com www.http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: cresc and decresc in French romantic music From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 10:03:03 -0700   Very smooth STOP crescendos are also possible on C-C organs; they're designed to do that, both intra-manually and inter-manually, thus:   Manuals coupled; reeds prepared   Recit - draw in succession Bourdon, Gambe, (Open or Harmonic) Flute, Diapason   go to the Positif, and then the G.O., and do the same thing in succession.   Or, for a different build-up:   Recit - draw the Bourdon   go to the Positif, and then the G.O., and do likewise.   Then the Gambes of the Recit, Positif, and Grand Orgue in succession, the open or harmonic flutes, and finally the Diapasons and the Montre.   Finally, engage the reed-ventils of the Recit, Positif, and G.O./Pedale in succession.   The need for the "Quatre Fonds" ... the Gambes and open or harmonic flutes as a dynamic and coloristic bridge between the Bourdons (almost always built as a Chimney Flute) and the Diapasons and Montres ... is an often-overlooked problem in registering French romantic music on American organs, along with the more familiar problem of the lack of 8' diapason tone in the Swell and Choir, and the almost universal lack of a CHORUS trompette on the Choir, so that a smooth Swell-Choir-Great/Pedal crescendo can be made by drawing the REEDS in succession.   In some organs, the dynamic levels of the Gambes and open or harmonic flutes are reversed, but the principle still applies. In that case, one would draw Bourdon-Open/Harmonic Flute-Gambe-Diapason in succession.   Also, Vierne in particular almost constantly calls for "Bourdon et (open or harmonic) Flute" at 8' in softer movements ... a sound that's VERY hard to come by on small and medium sized American organs. The best one can do is couple the two or three manual 8' flutes together (almost invariably stopped or chimney flutes) and hope for the best. The sound of a melody on the big G.O. flutes, accompanied by the bourdons or strings and celestes of the Recit or Recit/Positif is a ravishing one, and one that's not often available to us in the US.   The French romantic model is closer to what's needed for a SERVICE-PLAYING organ in MOST churches, unless one has a classic Germanic Lutheran service.   Cheers,   Bud   Andy Lawrence wrote: > To whoever mentioned the hitchdown swell pedal on Frank's organ: good > point, and well taken and appreciated. In fact, I think the point is = very > important, and very interesting to me because I did not know that. = However, > I'd like to point out (I'm sure you already knew this) that it is = possible > to have smooth crescendos and diminuendos with a hitchdown pedal... as = long > as the right foot is free. (Which obviously is not always the case). > > I have never done this but since I am a strong believer in registrants, = I've > considered having a registrant operate a hitchdown pedal for me (in = order to > simulate a balanced pedal), or even for a balanced pedal that is too far = to > the right, in which case the helper could operate it without interfering =   > with my pedaling. Team effort organ playing is fun! > > This has nothing to do with Franck, of course, at least not that I know > of. :) > > Andy > > > A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service > PO Box 111 > Burlington, VT 05402 > (802)578-3936 > Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: I give up! From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 12:15:13 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "bobelms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, October 17, 2004 6:34 AM Subject: I give up!     > I give up! PIPORG-L has removed my posting rights again. There seems to = be > some problem with the PIPORG-L server that I can't fix here, and I heard > from another lister who has the same problem. > > My comment on that list was that I heard the organ called a "kist of > whistles" by my grandmother (died 1950 aged 94 - so she went well back into > the 19th Century). Since I posted that on PIPORG-L another poster has > attributed it to John Knox. Correctly I believe. History also records = that > John Wesley banned organs from his chapels for some time but finally = gave > way in the face of pleas from his people and allowed the organ to be = used. > > There is a sect in my town who call themselves the (Independent) Church = of > Christ who claim that, as the apostles did not use musical instruments they > don't either as they worship exactly as did the apostles. Rather a = strange > claim seeing that as late as 60AD the apostles attended the Temple, > considering themselves as Jews and worshipping as Jews.   It is not even correct that Jews (including presumably Jesus and the disciples) didn't use musical instruments in their worship. Certainly = they used the shofar, but apart from that the Psalms refect the liturgical use = of instruments in such passages as Ps. 150, "praise him upon the well tuned cymbals, praise him upon the lute and harp," and so forth. They wouldn't have hung up their harps on the willow trees in Babylon if they hadn't = been wont to use them in Jerusalem. Some Christians have even wanted to ban music in church altogether let alone musical instruments, but are we not told that Jesus and his disciples went off singing hymns (actually, this would have been the Hallel, Psalms 113-118) after the Last Supper and = before his betrayal and arrest?   John Speller      
(back) Subject: cresc and decresc in French romantic music From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 12:47:14 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, October 17, 2004 12:03 PM Subject: cresc and decresc in French romantic music     > Very smooth STOP crescendos are also possible on C-C organs; they're > designed to do that, both intra-manually and inter-manually, thus: > > Manuals coupled; reeds prepared > > Recit - draw in succession Bourdon, Gambe, (Open or Harmonic) Flute, > Diapason > > go to the Positif, and then the G.O., and do the same thing in = succession. > > Or, for a different build-up: > > Recit - draw the Bourdon > > go to the Positif, and then the G.O., and do likewise. > > Then the Gambes of the Recit, Positif, and Grand Orgue in succession, > the open or harmonic flutes, and finally the Diapasons and the Montre. > > Finally, engage the reed-ventils of the Recit, Positif, and G.O./Pedale > in succession.   This is what is called "Terraced Dynamics". In my opinion the conversion = of Notre Dame de Paris to electric action with solid state combination action and all mod cons has made this more complicated to achieve than with the original Cavaill=E9-Coll console and equipment.   One of my old organ teachers, the late H. Howell Reed (composer of an extremely beautiful though extremely difficult and now long-forgotten Mag = & Nunc in B flat minor, published by Novello), went so far as to have the swell pedal on his organ (admittedly a balanced one) moved to the right = hand side rather than the middle, to be in the same position as a C-C one, in order to facilitate the authentic performance of Franck, Widor, etc.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: What I played today... From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 14:30:35 EDT   Friendship Missionary Baptist Church Charlotte, NC October 17, 2004 Monty Bennett, organist 7:30AM (Gospel Ensemble) 9:15AM (Ladies' Choir) 11:15 AM (Church Choir and "Youthful Praize" (Middle School Choir)) Music of Preparation:"Prelude on 'Michael'" (All My Hope on God is = Founded) Charles Callahan Hymn of Praise: Am I a Soldier of the Cross (Arlington) Ministry of Music: 7:30 & 11:15: Search Me, Lord (gospel) 9:15: I Came to Magnify the Lord (Mark = Condon) Prayer Chant (response) I Know Who Holds Tomorrow (Tomorrow) Ministry of Music: 7:30: Total Praise (Richard Smallwood) 9:15: A High Praise in a Low Place 11:15 2 selections from "Youthful Praize" Ministry of Thanksgiving 7:30: Just for Me 9:15: I Am What the Lord Says I Am 11:15: It's Amazing (Oliver Wells, arr. Carol Cymbala) Invitation to Christian Discipleship: We'll Understand it Better By and = By (By and By) Benediction Response: Danish Amen Postlude: Prelude in D Major (532) J. S. Bach  
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinion From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 13:47:18 -0500   In a room with good accoustics, you usually can play Franck with your left foot and operate the swell with your right unless you have to double pedal something.   > However, > I'd like to point out (I'm sure you already knew this) that it is > possible > to have smooth crescendos and diminuendos with a hitchdown pedal... as > long > as the right foot is free. (Which obviously is not always the case). >   > > Andy   >      
(back) Subject: Shofar, etc. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 14:55:03 -0400   On 10/17/04 1:15 PM, "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote:   > It is not even correct that Jews (including presumably Jesus and the > disciples) didn't use musical instruments in their worship. Certainly = they > used the shofar, but apart from that the Psalms refect the liturgical = use of > instruments in such passages as Ps. 150, "praise him upon the well tuned > cymbals, praise him upon the lute and harp," and so forth.   Isn't the distinction simply that they used instruments in Temple worship, but (generally) not in synagogue worship?   Doesn't Sebastian have a Shofar stop (and some other interesting ones?) on his beast at Temple Emanu-El?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: What I played today... From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 14:55:25 -0400   Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio October 17, 2004   Lutheran Book of Worship Setting no. 2 Prelude: Fantasy in C C=E9sar Franck Hymn: Thy Strong Word (Ebenezer) Anthem: Our Father-Mother God Randy Runyon Hymn: What a Friend We Have in Jesus (Converse) Offertory: Trio (alla breve) Josef Rheinberger Hymn: O Word of God Incarnate (Munich) Postlude: Little Prelude and Fugue in e J. S. Bach   The following note appeared in the bulletin, under the title Piping Up (Notes from the Music Director) It may come as a surprise to learn that the Bible features several maternal images for God. Isaiah 49.15: =B3Can a woman forget the infant at her breast, or a loving mother the child of her womb?... Yet I will not forget you.=B2 Isaiah 16.13: =B3As a mother comforts her son, so will I myself comfort you.=B2 Hosea 11.4: =B3But they did not know... that I had lifted the= m like a little child to my cheek, that I had bent down to feed them.=B2 Psalm 131. 1-2: =B3O Lord, my heart is not proud.... I submit myself... as a weaned child clinging to its mother.=B2 Luke 13.34: =B3O Jerusalem...! How often have I longed to gather your children, as a hen gathers her brood under her wings; but you would not let me.=B2 This imagery is also reflected in hymn 769 in With One Voice, =B3Mothering God, You Gave Me Birth.=B2 The phrase in the anthem=B9s title came to me as a memory from the time I spent playing the organ in a Christian Science Church in Annapolis, Maryland, in the late 1960s. It=B9s the first line of the Lord=B9s Prayer as rephrased by Mary Baker Eddy. I don=B9t think I agree with Mrs. Eddy about much else, however!     [I usually try play something appropriate as the children recess from the children's sermon, picking up on something they've just heard. Today they were asked the question, "If you wanted some love, where would you go? Could you buy it at the grocery store?" I just happened to have my fakebook with me (I don't usually take it to church), so I played, naturally............     "Money Can't Buy Me Love."]     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu        
(back) Subject: Re: Flashy short postludes? From: <DarrylbytheSea@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 15:50:36 EDT   Hi, Y'all!   The gigue fuges of Bach and Buxtehude would qualify as flashy, although = the Bach isn't quite as short as the Buxtehude. But still, all in all, I think = they both would qualify as short and flashy. I did the Buxtehude today and even = a few more than the usual group hung around to listen.   Yours,   Darryl by the Sea Nashville, TN  
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinion From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 17:27:09 EDT     In a message dated 10/17/04 1:49:56 PM, azeilenga@theatreorgans.com writes:     > In a room with good accoustics, you usually can play Franck with your > left foot and operate the swell with your right unless you have to > double pedal something.=A0 >=20 >=20   uh hum--so long as you dont break the legato AT ALL       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinion From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 17:50:27 -0400   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinion From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 18:00:49 EDT     In a message dated 10/17/04 4:49:24 PM, stevebest@usadatanet.net writes:     > Remembering where Franck's swell pedal was located (on the far right) and=20 > understanding that it was a hook-down swell pedal that didn't say open by=20 > itself unless the pedal was in one of the hooks ... I'm wondering about th= e "as=20 > long as you don't break the legato AT ALL." =A0Franck would have had no ch= oice=20 > but to break the legato. =A0 Is my recollection correct? >=20 As far as I am concerned, the rule with French music to maitain an absolute=20 legato--or at least create the illusion of one by making the top and bottom=20 voices seamless- here's how:   Toe/heel substitution I've also heard that it is a practice that a registrant sometimes operates=20 the spoon   also-knowing that Franck had huge hands-probably meant his feet were huge=20 too--   Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: What I played today... From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 17:01:42 -0500   Hi Monty! I don't know the Callahan prelude on 'Michael'- what collection is it from? I have a nice setting of that tune by Michael Burkhardt. We're singing the tune in a few weeks, and I'm always up for a new setting of a hymntune, especially one I like as well as 'Michael'   Blessings, Beau Surratt Director of Music and Organist First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324