PipeChat Digest #4832 - Sunday, October 17, 2004
 
Re: cresc and decresc in French romantic music
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
cresc and decres in Franck
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
as long as you don't break the legato
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
"Independent Church of Christ"
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Your opinion
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
organs in churches
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Prelude on "Michael"
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Prelude on "Michael"
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: What I played today...
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Re: cresc and decres in Franck
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: cresc and decres in Franck
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
RE: "Independent Church of Christ"
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: as long as you don't break the legato
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Your opinion
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
St. Luke's Day
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: "Independent Church of Christ"
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Franck's pedal technique
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Franck's pedal technique
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Austin Valve Tremolos
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
RE: What I played today...
  by "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net>
tempos in Franck
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: cresc and decresc in French romantic music From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:03:32 EDT     In a message dated 10/17/04 11:59:38 AM, quilisma@cox.net writes:     > Andy Lawrence wrote: > > To whoever mentioned the hitchdown swell pedal on Frank's organ:=A0 good > > point, and well taken and appreciated.=A0 In fact, I think the point is=20= very > > important, and very interesting to me because I did not know that.=A0=20 > However, > > I'd like to point out (I'm sure you already knew this) that it is possib= le > > to have smooth crescendos and diminuendos with a hitchdown pedal... as=20 > long > > as the right foot is free.=A0 (Which obviously is not always the case). > > > > I have never done this but since I am a strong believer in registrants,=20 > I've > > considered having a registrant operate a hitchdown pedal for me (in orde= r=20 > to > > simulate a balanced pedal), or even for a balanced pedal that is too far= =20 > to > > the right, in which case the helper could operate it without interfering > > with my pedaling.=A0 Team effort organ playing is fun! > > >=20   That was me who mentioned it. gfc :)       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: cresc and decres in Franck From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 17:02:03 -0700       Gfc234@aol.com wrote:   > > In a message dated 10/17/04 1:49:56 PM, azeilenga@theatreorgans.com = writes: > > >> In a room with good accoustics, you usually can play Franck with your >> left foot and operate the swell with your right unless you have to >> double pedal something. >> > > > uh hum--so long as you dont break the legato AT ALL > > > > Gregory Ceurvorst > 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS > Evanston, IL 60201 > 847.332.2788 home/fax > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com > gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net   Yeah.   I've often wondered how one was supposed to do the cresc and decresc in the second adagio of Grand Piece Symphonique, which not ONLY has a double Pedale part, but (I think) separate cresc and decresc markings at DIFFERENT times for the Recit and Positif ... that's something of a curiosity, since the Positif at St. Clotilde was unenclosed; the only C-C organ with an enclosed Positif that I know of is Sacre Coeur.   If I remember correctly, GPS WAS written for the Trocadero organ ... was the Positif THERE enclosed? It no longer exists in its original form, Gonzales having gotten his grubby mitts on it and moved it somewhere and "rebuilt" it.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: as long as you don't break the legato From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 17:06:17 -0700   I don't recall about the acoustics of St. Clotilde, but MOST of those huge French churches will cover a multitude of sins (chuckle) ... it's funny to listen to French organists on their home turfs, especially on C-Cs in original condition ... the reed ventils are engaged, and the reeds SORTA come on at the beat they're supposed to, KINDA (grin).   I've never heard the GPS played at St. Sulpice, but I suspect you could play the right foot of the second Adagio STACCATO and nobody downstairs would know the difference (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud   Stephen Best wrote:   > Remembering where Franck's swell pedal was located (on the far right) > and understanding that it was a hook-down swell pedal that didn't say > open by itself unless the pedal was in one of the hooks ... I'm > wondering about the "as long as you don't break the legato AT ALL." > Franck would have had no choice but to break the legato. Is my > recollection correct? > > Steve Best in Utica, NY > > Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > >> >> In a message dated 10/17/04 1:49:56 PM, azeilenga@theatreorgans.com >> writes: >> >> >>> In a room with good accoustics, you usually can play Franck with your >>> left foot and operate the swell with your right unless you have to >>> double pedal something. >>> >> >> >> uh hum--so long as you dont break the legato AT ALL >> >> >> >> Gregory Ceurvorst >> 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS >> Evanston, IL 60201 >> 847.332.2788 home/fax >> 708.243.2549 mobile >> gfc234@aol.com >> gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net > > > ****************************************************************** "Pipe =   > Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: > mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:      
(back) Subject: "Independent Church of Christ" From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:23:12 -0500   Bob Elms spoke of the independent Church of Christ in Australia that does not use instrumental music. This is a wing of a 19th Century American movement that is actually rather large, and includes three major strands = (or denominations). The best known--and smallest--is the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). The "middle" group is known as the "independent Christian churches/churches of Christ" and is currently one of the fastest growing denominations in the US. Only the one branch Bob crossed paths = with uses a capella music only, and it is particularly strong in the American south. The "theology" is not that whether instruments were used in temple worship, but whether there are any clear cut examples of its use in the church that are recorded in the New Testament. If one does not see a New Testament precedent for something, then one can either conclude that it is prohibited (the narrow direction) or that we are free to choose (providing it it does not break some explicit commandment). One problem, of course, = is that it often leads to a rather legalistic direction--that is, how can we justify church buildings, microphones, hymnbooks, but not a piano?   BTW, the groups are NOT historically related at all to the United Church = of Christ, except for a few churches in one of the four strands that make up the UCC.   Collectively, they are sometimes known as the Stone-Campbell Movement = after Barton W. Stone and Alexander Campbell, two leading lights in the founding of the movement.   IIRC, Last time I checked all three groups were in the 20 largest denominations in the US.   More than you probably wanted to know.   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinion From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 20:44:51 -0400   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: organs in churches From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 18:04:09 -0700   It might be well to remember that many Christian churches STILL forbid the use of the organ ... the entire Eastern Orthodox world still does, with the exception of some Greek Orthodox churches in the US.   Presumably the Eastern Orthodox prohibition was on account of the hydraulus being used to accompany "orgies" and the martyrdom of early Christians in the amphitheatres of the Roman/Byzantine Empire until Constantine's conversion and the fall of Rome in the West.   Outside the US, the pre-Vatican II Roman Catholic rules against playing the organ during Advent and Lent are still observed in many if not MOST Catholic countries; in Spain and Portugal, the great doors on the fronts of the cases of historic organs are closed, and sometimes shrouded in purple as well.   Organs didn't arrive in PARISH churches in the Anglican Communion until the late 17th - early 18th century, and a good number of them were "barrel" organs without finger keyboards, having a few simple metrical psalm tunes "pinned" on a rotating wooden barrel, something like a large music box. A single handle provided the energy for both the wind and the rotation of the barrel, making for some interesting tempo changes if the pumper got tired (chuckle).   I'm sure everyone remembers the story of the Brattle Organ in the US ... one parishioner offered to pay for it himself if the captain of the ship would throw it into Boston Harbor (grin).   US Presbyterians and Baptists resisted the introduction of organs until the VERY late 19th - early 20th century, except in large cities in the North. The proliferation of harmoniums in HOMES probably resulted in their eventual migration to the churches, though that's just a guess. A review of Estey's reed organ catalogs would probably give an idea of when their advertising started targeting churches.   Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Prelude on "Michael" From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 21:03:52 EDT   Beau asked about the prelude I played today... The Charles Callahan setting of the Herbert Howells hymntune "Michael" is = in "Two English Voluntaries for Organ, published by Concordia 97-6724. Also =   included in the book is "Fanfare on Abbot's Leigh", which is sort of in = the style of the Willian "Gelobt sei Gott." Anyway, the Prelude on 'Michael' is sort of lush, calling for the accompaniment on celestes, with the melody on 8' foundations. I souped it = up a little more, soloing out counter melodies from the Antiphonal division, and = using a bit more "slush" than called for, but it worked. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Prelude on "Michael" From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 20:01:40 -0400   The "Abbot's Leigh" is tons o' fun, in my opinion. This is a very useable set of pieces!   Chuck Peery St. Louis On Oct 17, 2004, at 9:03 PM, RMB10@aol.com wrote:   > Beau asked about the prelude I played today... > The Charles Callahan setting of the Herbert Howells hymntune > "Michael" is in > "Two English Voluntaries for Organ, published by Concordia 97-6724. > Also > included in the book is "Fanfare on Abbot's Leigh", which is sort of > in the > style of the Willian "Gelobt sei Gott." > > Anyway, the Prelude on 'Michael' is sort of lush, calling for the > accompaniment on celestes, with the melody on 8' foundations. I > souped it up a little > more, soloing out counter melodies from the Antiphonal division, and > using a > bit more "slush" than called for, but it worked. > > Monty Bennett > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: Re: What I played today... From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 21:10:01 EDT   United Methodist Church of Red Bank, New Jersey Neil Brown, Director of Music Ministries and Organist   Children's Sabbath Crop Walk Day   10:30 service (on the Hradetsky tracker): Prelude: Three Trumpet Tunes: *"Trumpet Voluntary", H. Purcell. *"Prince of Denmark", J. Clarke. *"To God Let Us Sing Our Praises", M-A Charpentier. *"Entry of the Queen", from Solomon, G. F. Handel. Organ Offertory: "Psalm 19", B. Marcello.   Choral Introit: "Open Our Eyes", Bob Cull (I think that's his name). Anthem: "Be Strong in the Lord", Tom Fettke.   Hymns: "This Is My Song", FINLANDIA. "Lord of All Hopefullness", SLANE. "We Are Marching", SIYAHAMBA (everyone went out singing: first the walkers for Crop Walk, then everyone else..I played the chorus through = about 7 or 8 times).   8:30 service (on the Steinway): Piano Prelude: "Entry of the Queen", Handel. Offertory: "To God Let Us Sing our Praises", Charpentier. Communion: "Communion Medley", arr. G. Sykes. Postlude: "Psalm 19", Marcello.  
(back) Subject: Re: cresc and decres in Franck From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 20:17:01 -0500   At 5:02 PM -0700 10/17/04, Liquescent wrote: > >If I remember correctly, GPS WAS written for the Trocadero organ ... >was the Positif THERE enclosed? It no longer exists in its original >form, Gonzales having gotten his grubby mitts on it and moved it >somewhere and "rebuilt" it.   The Palais du Trocadero Organ did have a "Positif-Expressif" of 12 stops originally.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: cresc and decres in Franck From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 20:17:14 -0500   In a room with a few seconds of reverb, no one will notice. There's a few places where you really can't play legato AND operate the swell. My friend -MM and Certificate from NEC- says the same thing. Alicia Zeilenga       -----Original Message----- From: Liquescent <quilisma@cox.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 17:02:03 -0700 Subject: cresc and decres in Franck   > > > Gfc234@aol.com wrote: > > > > > In a message dated 10/17/04 1:49:56 PM, azeilenga@theatreorgans.com > writes: > > > > > >> In a room with good accoustics, you usually can play Franck with > your > >> left foot and operate the swell with your right unless you have to > >> double pedal something. > >> > > > > > > uh hum--so long as you dont break the legato AT ALL > > > > > > > > Gregory Ceurvorst > > 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS > > Evanston, IL 60201 > > 847.332.2788 home/fax > > 708.243.2549 mobile > > gfc234@aol.com > > gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net > > Yeah. > > I've often wondered how one was supposed to do the cresc and decresc in > the second adagio of Grand Piece Symphonique, which not ONLY has a > double Pedale part, but (I think) separate cresc and decresc markings > at > DIFFERENT times for the Recit and Positif ... that's something of a > curiosity, since the Positif at St. Clotilde was unenclosed; the only > C-C organ with an enclosed Positif that I know of is Sacre Coeur. > > If I remember correctly, GPS WAS written for the Trocadero organ ... > was > the Positif THERE enclosed? It no longer exists in its original form, > Gonzales having gotten his grubby mitts on it and moved it somewhere > and > "rebuilt" it. > > Cheers, > > Bud > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: RE: "Independent Church of Christ" From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 20:19:59 -0500   I have had personal experience with this group. I was called upon twice to help plan recorded music for the bride (a high school friend and her sister) during a wedding. They apparently allowed 'canned' instrumental music, but not sung music of a religious nature to accompaniment.   Go figure.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: as long as you don't break the legato From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 20:23:54 -0500   At 5:06 PM -0700 10/17/04, Liquescent wrote: >I don't recall about the acoustics of St. Clotilde, but MOST of >those huge French churches will cover a multitude of sins (chuckle) >... it's funny to listen to French organists on their home turfs, >especially on C-Cs in original condition ... the reed ventils are >engaged, and the reeds SORTA come on at the beat they're supposed >to, KINDA (grin). > >I've never heard the GPS played at St. Sulpice, but I suspect you >could play the right foot of the second Adagio STACCATO and nobody >downstairs would know the difference (chuckle).   I seem to remember reading some place that Franck's pedal technique left much to be desired at least in terms of how we play today. Franck was originally a pianist and came to the organ a bit later. I gather that he was in some cases a "left-footed" organist and didn't always maintain a legato pedal line. But i am sure the acoustics of St. Clotilde probably covered some of that up.   I "think" Rollin Smith covered some of that in one of his books.   David    
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinion From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 20:27:32 -0500   >I recall at least one American teacher who would on occasion insist >his students pedal something like the adagio from the Franck A minor >chorale using only the left foot so as to more closely duplicate >what Franck would have had to do. Sometimes doing all left foot >pedaling in that work clarified phrasing significantly. Daniel >Roth showed similar lack of concern for pedal legato at a master >class I attended. Oh well -- it all makes for interesting >discussion no matter what!   That is the way I was taught to handle the pedal line in the adagio section of the a-minor. In order to follow the expression markings, which are important to that section, you need to handle the pedal with only the left foot.   David  
(back) Subject: St. Luke's Day From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 21:57:39 -0400   Tomorrow is St. Luke=B9s Day (in Western Christianity), so, since our parish is dedicated to the Evangelist=B9s memory, we observe his patronal festival on the nearest Sunday. It went great. Lots of festive smells and bells, of course. Music was provided by a half-dozen string players, choir, and organist. (And by us in the pews, of course.)   Prelude: Dreissig Spielst=FCcke f=FCr die Kleinorgel, Opus 18/1. Hugo Distler= .. (I guess our Orgel qualifies as =B3klein=8B23 ranks.) Processional: O sing jubilee to the Lord (GUDS MENIGHET SYNG) Hymn of the Day: Holy Spirit ever dwelling (IN BABILONE) Cantata at the offerings: Wo Gott zuhaus nit gibt sein Gunst, Opus 11/1. Hugo Distler. (Maybe 12-14 minutes, chorales and two duets, plus instrumentals; pretty fine stuff; English translation in bulletin.) Recessional: Listen, God is calling (NENO LAKE MUNGU) (Tanzanian; Northwes= t Tanzania is our sister synod) Postlude: Postlude in G Major. John Stanley.   At the =B3announcements=B2 at the end, a VERY dignified man of conSIDerable antiquity (a visitor) stood up and thanked the music people, complimenting them on their German, and relating that he=B9d heard that very Distler cantat= a at the Berlin Cathedral in 1939!!, and that our rendition was, to his ears, quite satisfactory in comparison. Well, THAT made the choir glow!   A MOST satisfying celebration. The preaching was first-class too!   Alan =20    
(back) Subject: Re: "Independent Church of Christ" From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 22:03:44 -0400   On 10/17/04 8:23 PM, "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> wrote:   > More than you probably wanted to know.   Quite wrong, Pastor Steckley! I've many times tried to untangle the = threads in those groups. You have provided, in a few minutes, at least 90 percent of what I've been looking for. Your post is being printed for keeping in the right place.   Thank you!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Franck's pedal technique From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:13:13 -0700       David Scribner wrote:   > > > I seem to remember reading some place that Franck's pedal technique left =   > much to be desired at least in terms of how we play today. Franck was > originally a pianist and came to the organ a bit later. I gather that > he was in some cases a "left-footed" organist and didn't always maintain =   > a legato pedal line. But i am sure the acoustics of St. Clotilde > probably covered some of that up. > > I "think" Rollin Smith covered some of that in one of his books. > > David >   That brings up the question of the pedal parts at the end of the GPS, and also the Final ... did Franck never perform them himself? They aren't THAT difficult by today's standards (other than one place in the GPS where the Dupre edition calls for heel-toe from D# to F#) (!!) ... were they played at slower tempos than Tournemire indicates?   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: Franck's pedal technique From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 21:34:16 -0500   At 7:13 PM -0700 10/17/04, Liquescent wrote: > >That brings up the question of the pedal parts at the end of the >GPS, and also the Final ... did Franck never perform them himself? >They aren't THAT difficult by today's standards (other than one >place in the GPS where the Dupre edition calls for heel-toe from D# >to F#) (!!) ... were they played at slower tempos than Tournemire >indicates?   Again, i seem to remember some discussion about the tempos and that Franck actually played at slower tempos than we are used to using today. It might be in the Rollin Smith book or maybe in an article in The Diapason or TAO. I can't remember right off hand where this was covered.   David  
(back) Subject: Austin Valve Tremolos From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 22:53:08 -0400 (Eastern Standard Time)   Hi List,=0D =0D For about a year now, I've been spending some of my spare time with a = big burly, symphonic, 1926 Austin that pulled my strings when I met it. It = has suffered some "scent marking" over the years, much of which I have revers= ed to original specs. This big fella is a typical Austin of its day, with b= ig tongue-and-groove board swell boxes, ten 16' pedal stops - including a butt-kicking First Open, Trombone, and Tuba Profunda, not to mention the Swell strings, that you could fry a whole pig on - all controlled by a bi= g=20 ski-slope" 4 manual console that has not been nuked!=0D =0D Can you tell I kinda like the instrument? Anyway...=0D =0D The poor Vox Humana has suffered the indignity of having no tremolo available, which is something I would like to fix before Christmas if I c= an - a nice present for the organist. This Vox is located inside a double-expression box inside the Swell. The Swell chest is about the siz= e of a football field, but the Vox, and 4 other ranks, have their own key action and some sort of divider panels that are missing, to separate them from the main chest air, just below the actions. There is a beater box downstairs that is ducted off of this small portion of chest, but other t= han that, I have nothing but empty holes and wires sticking out. I'm not eve= n sure if the holes and wires are for the tremolo.=0D =0D So, I'd like to know if anyone on the list can tell me about how old Austin valve tremolos work, and what sort of machinery turns this thing o= n and off, and separates the beating air from the supply air!=0D =0D Thanks!=0D =0D Best,=0D =0D Nathan=0D =0D =20
(back) Subject: RE: What I played today... From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 22:16:02 -0500   I'm rather partial to a setting by lister Bob Lind. It's rather recent so = I don't know if he's submitted it for publication but I know of a few copies laying about:-)   Michael - who rather likes the tune, too     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Beau Surratt Sent: Sunday, October 17, 2004 5:02 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: What I played today...     Hi Monty! I don't know the Callahan prelude on 'Michael'- what collection is it from? I have a nice setting of that tune by Michael Burkhardt. We're singing the tune in a few weeks, and I'm always up for a new setting of a hymntune, especially one I like as well as 'Michael'      
(back) Subject: tempos in Franck From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 20:21:41 -0700   I have the Touremire metronome markings written into my Frank edition, at least for the pieces I play(ed); I don't remember where I got them .... Craighead? Crozier? ... but in any case they don't agree with Dupre's, which, if I remember correctly, are generally faster than Tournemire's.   I can't check right now ... my remaining music library is packed for yet another hasty move, to a cheaper place.   Of course, Dupre and Langlais tangled about the wholesale changes Dupre made to Franck's registration, etc. in his (Dupre's) edition; Langlais had the tradition from Tournemire, who had it from Franck, so Langlais was probably RIGHT ... certainly about the registrations, in any case.   Dupre must have been ... mmm ... quite "formidable." (chuckle)   Cheers,   Bud   David Scribner wrote:   > At 7:13 PM -0700 10/17/04, Liquescent wrote: > >> >> That brings up the question of the pedal parts at the end of the GPS, >> and also the Final ... did Franck never perform them himself? They >> aren't THAT difficult by today's standards (other than one place in >> the GPS where the Dupre edition calls for heel-toe from D# to F#) (!!) >> ... were they played at slower tempos than Tournemire indicates? > > > Again, i seem to remember some discussion about the tempos and that > Franck actually played at slower tempos than we are used to using > today. It might be in the Rollin Smith book or maybe in an article in > The Diapason or TAO. I can't remember right off hand where this was > covered. > > David > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >