PipeChat Digest #4833 - Monday, October 18, 2004
 
Watanabe duo-organ, Lancaster PA
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Alan's Remarks
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
small scale stopped pipe
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: cresc and decresc in French romantic music
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re:What I played today
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Prelude on "Michael"
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
RE: What I played today...
  by <SWF12262@aol.com>
unit-construction pedal stops
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: What BEAU will play soon...
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
stop crescendos
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Registering Franck's A minor Chorale...Was:  Your Opinion...French Rom. R
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: unit-construction pedal stops
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Largest repertoire?
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
"caged rage" and C-C swell boxes
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: "caged rage" and C-C swell boxes
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Shofar, etc.
  by <Joshwwhite@aol.com>
Re: "caged rage" and C-C swell boxes
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Watanabe duo-organ, Lancaster PA From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 23:52:21 -0400   Dear Y'All,   Just to report that the duo-organ program in at Grace Lutheran, Lancaster, this afternoon by Kiyo and Chiemi Watanabe from Wichita Falls TX was absolutely WONDERFUL! I could not see them from my seat, but the sounds would never have suggested that two persons were at the console together, save that an individual performer could not have conjured up all those sounds from the organ by himself.   Two major works: the famous two-performer sonata by Gustav Merkel and a transcription of Franz Liszt's important orchestral symphonic poem _Les Pr=E9ludes_. Two cute works by Robin Dinda came just before the Liszt: "Ma= x Cat Rag" and "Charlie Dog Blues," both written for Dinda's pets.   Barrie Cabena's Variations on an Original Theme and "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" from Handel's oratorio _Solomon_ rounded out the program. The played Sousa's "The Stars and Stripes Forever" for an encore, too.   They used the organ (1967 Schlicker, 54 ranks, with new Great principal chorus and added 16' and 32' digital Bourdon stops) VERY well.   The Watanabe's were ever so warm and out-going both to our public and i= n private, and they surely endeared themselves to the crowd at a free light supper that followed the program.   In a word, the program was delightful.   Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Alan's Remarks From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 23:08:34 -0500   Alan......thanks for your kind remarks. If you need help with the other = 10% let me know off list!   Most of our denominational families run a similar gamut within the general theology of the family--e.g., ELCA, MO Synod, Wisc. Synod, etc.   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: small scale stopped pipe From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 23:27:18 -0500   Is there such a thing as a very small-scaled stopped pipe--more along a string-scale, but stopped?   I may end up putting a few parts together--for fun--as a one manual (no pedal) residence organ with split keyboard for versatility. Since it will be a residence organ, and space is at a bit of a premium, I certainly = don't need a honkin' big 16' bourdon.......I just want 12 stopped pipes for a common bass 16' octave.   And what would we call such a rank.....Stopped String 16'? Can't imagine = it would be very stringy, though, as a stopped rank.   Maybe I could make it out of PVC pipe....I've heard of that being done.   BTW, I've often thought it would save some space and weight in small = organs if, say, the bottom octave of the 16' stop was a "unit" manufactured out = of two sheets of (high quality) plywood with dividers sandwiched between, fitting into routed slots to form the side walls of individual pipes. Two adjacent pipes would share a common side wall. Upper ends could be cut to length, and mouths could be formed in the usual way; feet perhaps going = into the back side of the pipe bottom. Such a unit would probably be strong enough to serve as the back or side of a small organ case. Have I just reinvented the wheel? Has it been done?     Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: cresc and decresc in French romantic music From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 21:37:17 -0700 (PDT)   Bud Thanks for these tips...im going to save them to memory. They are very, = very helpful. Until a recent coaching session with a local church = musician, I was doing some different registrations of a French Romantic = piece, than the composer called for in the lines. (I know...Bad Desiree') = Once I played the piece on an organ in Detroit with very, very full 8' = stops, it sounded different than it did on any other American Organ I had = tried it on before. That coaching session also helped me see that the = piece asks for seamless transitions, while remaining respectful to the = composers desires. So in order to do this, the person I coached with = offered many helpful tips. What you have written here will just add some = more help to what he gave. Glad to see you back to yourself. FWIW TDH       From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? vote.yahoo.com - Register online to vote today!
(back) Subject: Re:What I played today From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 22:37:06 -0700 (PDT)   Prelude Prelude on Bunessan (from Organ Hymn Arrangements) Gil Martin (the organ handeled this festive setting beautifully) Processional Hymn: My Faith Looks up to Thee Olivet Introduction: Olivetian Fanfare arr. Hines Choir Anthem: Lead Me Lord SS Wesley (The choir had this down in ONE rehearsal, as most are husband/wife teams, = and were on a Columbus Day trip last week) Sermon Hymn: A Living Faith St Catherine Offertory: A Quiet Reflection Christopher Tambling Response to Prayer : Choir, Sevenfold Amen J. Stainer Closing Hymn : Old 122nd ( I forget the actual text, but the choir = quickly announced their dislike of the tune: the pastor picked it...I = did'nt! They overrule the pastor, and they make it known!) Choral Benediction: The Benediction of Aaron ES Lorenz Postlude: Marche Triumphale in Eb Noel Rawsthorne This and next week, Im offering for musical prayer pieces of Gil Martin = and Noel Rawsthorne, for prelude and postlude.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard.
(back) Subject: Re: Prelude on "Michael" From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 22:43:55 -0700 (PDT)   Being one of the Episcopalians on the list, the tune "Michael" is for the = lovely hymn, "All My Hope on God is Founded" Beau, that should be in With One Voice as well. It, like Laudate Dominum, = is one of those hymntunes that is truly fun to play and even more to sing. =   Thanks to Monty for mentioning the collection it is in.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: RE: What I played today... From: <SWF12262@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 01:45:04 EDT   Prelude: Hymn Prelude on St. Anne (Healey Willan) Processional: O God, Our Help in Ages Past (St. Anne) Mass Ordinary: Sing Praise and Thanksgiving (J. Michael Joncas) Offertory Anthem: He Watching Over Israel (Felix Mendelssohn) Communion: On Eagle's Wings [gag barf! cordially despise it, but the congregation loves it; works best with soloist singing verses and = congregation singing refrain] [golly, maybe I can get away with not using it for a year = or so at Sunday Mass -- heaven knows every other funeral will request this this = this .... thing] Communion Anthem: Jerusalem, Jerusalem (arranged from Gregorian Chant = with psalm verses for TB in Tonus Perigrinus by John Lee in Nine Motets and Anthems, GIA Publications -- a very tasty a capella piece) Recessional: There's a Wideness In God's Mercy (In Babilone) Postlude: Improvisation on In Babilone [I like to use the beginning of = the melody --first four notes -- as a pedal motiv, then do wild and crazy = things in the manuals!] BTW, BBC Radio 3 is great! I sang with the RSCM Montreal Boys' Choir = Course in August, under the direction of Christopher Robinson, and our efforts = were broadcast on Choral Evensong. What a great resource that weekly show is! = I would also recommend our local fine arts radio station -- WFMT in = Chicago. I think WFMT is available on cable and satelite radio -- provocative programming in serious music plus "With Heart and Voice" and = "Pipedreams!" In my opinion, the best "classical" station in the nation! Steve Folkers Steven Weyand Folkers St. Lambert Church Skokie, IL    
(back) Subject: unit-construction pedal stops From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 22:53:09 -0700       First Christian Church of Casey, IL wrote:   > I > > BTW, I've often thought it would save some space and weight in small = organs > if, say, the bottom octave of the 16' stop was a "unit" manufactured out = of > two sheets of (high quality) plywood with dividers sandwiched between, > fitting into routed slots to form the side walls of individual pipes. = Two > adjacent pipes would share a common side wall. Upper ends could be cut = to > length, and mouths could be formed in the usual way; feet perhaps going = into > the back side of the pipe bottom. Such a unit would probably be strong > enough to serve as the back or side of a small organ case. Have I just > reinvented the wheel? Has it been done? > > > Dennis Steckley > Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines > >     You have indeed (chuckle). Walcker and others have done it; Oberlinger started advertising something similar recently for their small organs.   It's also sorta the same basic technique used for the Compton Cube and the Holtkamp Polyphone for space-saving 32' stops, though I understand the former is more successful than the latter ... Holtkamp abandoned the idea quite a few years ago, and most of them have been replaced with real or digital 32's.   I played a small tracker (Rieger?) in Holy Cross Episcopal Church in Dallas where the 16' Bourdon formed the entire moveable platform for the whole organ. Somehow, the 16' pipes had no feet, and the mouths were at what would normally be the bottom of the pipes, which were flush with the edge of the platform. I don't know how they were winded, but the whole thing was VERY compact.   It was sorta cute ... when you approached the keydesk from the rear, it looked like the organ was grinning at you (or preparing to EAT you) ... depending on your point of view (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: Re: What BEAU will play soon... From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 22:59:04 -0700 (PDT)   Mea Culpa Beau ! Im a day late and a dollar short! Late evening dinner parties will do it = to ya! Looks like you are already singing "All My Hope..." Its a very fun tune. = To do full swell with.         From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? vote.yahoo.com - Register online to vote today!
(back) Subject: stop crescendos From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 23:16:43 -0700   A friend of mine played the Reubke as the recital before Vespers one Sunday afternoon at Old St. Mary's years ago ... the organ is a modest-sized '28 or '29 3m Austin in YUMMY acoustics.   I was pulling stops for him, and there was one point where it had to go from FF to ppp (of COURSE) ... I did the final decrescendo by hand on the Swell ... he stopped during the practice session and said, "WOW! How'd you DO that?"   Younger organists, please don't make the mistake of replacing all those 8' stops on romantic/orchestral organs with inappropriate upperwork ... they're there for a REASON.   That Swell, from softest to loudest, was something like   8' Echo Salicional 8' Echo Salicional Celeste 8' Stopped Diapason 8' Viole d'Orchestre 8' Viole Celeste 8' Violin Diapason 8' Phonon Diapason 8' Oboe   The only peculiarity was that the Trumpet was on the Great, rather than the Swell, but all the Great except for the First Open was also enclosed, so it didn't matter TOO much ... when we salvaged some of Cincinnati Music Hall's Austin, we gained a Choir 8' Bassoon that could sorta substitute for a small Swell Trumpet.   EVERY SINGLE STOP on that organ locked together like nobody's business.   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Registering Franck's A minor Chorale...Was: Your Opinion...French Rom. Reg's From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 23:20:43 -0700 (PDT)   I have a question for Bud, or any other listers that can offer insight. = This is also a partial confession. While I do not play the Franck A Minor (Good luck to my friend Bernadette) = I did learn it as an intensive study with a teacher. When I was learning it with that teacher, there was one place where the = registration was different than I had usually heard, but I did so to = appease that teacher. This was at the, I dare call it, resatement of the = opening theme after the chorale is stated (The modulatory section leading = to the adagio, with the pedal droning at low A). In this section, the = manuals are P or PP, if im correct. What should one do with the pedal = registration at this point? I was taught by that teacher to do absolutely = nothing to the pedal registration, as the pedal reeds would still be on. Just eager to get some thoughts TDH     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Re: unit-construction pedal stops From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 02:35:42 EDT     In a message dated 10/18/04 12:49:33 AM, quilisma@cox.net writes:     >=20 >=20 > First Christian Church of Casey, IL wrote: >=20 > > I > > > > BTW, I've often thought it would save some space and weight in small=20 > organs > > if, say, the bottom octave of the 16' stop was a "unit" manufactured out= =20 > of > > two sheets of (high quality) plywood with dividers sandwiched between, > > fitting into routed slots to form the side walls of individual pipes.= =A0 Two > > adjacent pipes would share a common side wall.=A0 Upper ends could be cu= t to > > length, and mouths could be formed in the usual way; feet perhaps going=20 > into > > the back side of the pipe bottom.=A0 Such a unit would probably be stron= g > > enough to serve as the back or side of a small organ case.=A0 Have I jus= t > > reinvented the wheel?=A0 Has it been done? > > > > > > Dennis Steckley > > Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines > > > > >=20 >=20 > You have indeed (chuckle). Walcker and others have done it; Oberlinger > started advertising something similar recently for their small organs. >=20 > It's also sorta the same basic technique used for the Compton Cube and > the Holtkamp Polyphone for space-saving 32' stops, though I understand > the former is more successful than the latter ... Holtkamp abandoned the > idea quite a few years ago, and most of them have been replaced with > real or digital 32's. >=20 > I played a small tracker (Rieger?) in Holy Cross Episcopal Church in > Dallas where the 16' Bourdon formed the entire moveable platform for the > whole organ. Somehow, the 16' pipes had no feet, and the mouths were at > what would normally be the bottom of the pipes, which were flush with > the edge of the platform. I don't know how they were winded, but the > whole thing was VERY compact. >=20 > It was sorta cute ... when you approached the keydesk from the rear, it > looked like the organ was grinning at you (or preparing to EAT you) ... > depending on your point of view (chuckle). >=20 > Cheers, >=20 > Bud >=20   I've actually played one of those Riegers -they were an experiment in the 50= s=20 I think. There was one on ebay a while ago for a pretty penny. gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Largest repertoire? From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 10:01:47 +0300   Colin Mitchell cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk wrote:   "Mentioning "Organs and Organists on-line," I think this is the most wonderful creation, for with that particular web site, we have real, living art and intercourse. If "Organs and Organists on-line" had a seperate section for improvisation, it would also be a valuable archive in years to come....shades of Tournemire and Durufle.   It is very exciting to hear regular contributors to pipechat play the organ, and to hear some superb performances from people of whom one may not have heard previously. I would single out the Timothy Grenz performances of Bach, and the superb Fantasia & Fugue in C Minor (Bach) by Chris Howeter as fine examples. To hear the latest digital organs is also very, very interesting....Trinity NY being especially fascinating. Then we come across not one, or two, but FOUR young organists from Norway; one of whom is a composer! And what a wonderful showcase for young organists O & O O L is. Even more fascinating, will be to chart their musical development on-line.   At long last, it seems that the internet is fulfilling its promise, for it cannot be long before we can hear live music and vision.....maybe on-line teaching or recital audiences....the sky is the limit.   Of perhaps equal importance, is the opportunity to archive the sound of organs threatened by church closures etc.   It's all very exciting, and I personally feel very grateful to Tim Grenz and John Foss, as I sit here listening to downloaded files and tapping away on the computer."   Thank you for the kind words, Colin - it is nice to know we are = appreciated! Also thank you to Alan Freed for his encouragement.   In connection with the improvisation, we have quite a few improvisations already online, and could perhaps group them into a category of their own. They range from improvisation as an art form in itself to the "and this gives you some idea of the sounds of this organ" type. I have one or two = of the latter type to add from Australia, though the offerings of Marc = Giacone and those from Norway are, I think, more musically developed than the ones = I recorded, which are of the sort you might hear before a service in a Cathedral or Parish Church in England. They are intended to show off the range of tone colours of an instrument rather than be an essay in improviational form. Ever willing to improve, I am planning on attending Marc Giacone's summer master classes!   Tim Grenz has now added an "organist index" to the downloads section,   John Foss www.organsandorganistsonline.com www.http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: "caged rage" and C-C swell boxes From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 00:24:44 -0700   Sorry, my music filing cabinet has already gone over to the new place, and I can't visualize the spot you're talking about.   Just a general comment: "pp" can mean a couple of things ... most OFTEN, it simply means "Recit box closed," NO MATTER what is drawn IN the Recit, OR elsewhere. It just means "close the box TIGHT."   C-C virtually invented the "caged rage" sound of Full Swell to Reeds with the box closed ... he was inspired in part by the permanently boxed-in Echo divisions of the late Spanish baroque organs, and those glorious Spanish reeds ... the C-C family is from a border province ... the English got it from C-C ... or they invented it simultaneously, or whatever (chuckle), depending on who tells the story (grin).   Those French swell boxes CAN *almost* make a pp with the box closed, even with Full Swell to Reeds drawn, partially because in several organs (St. Sulpice among them), when C-C had to re-use an existing case or buffet from an older organ, he couldn't FIT the Recit into the main case; he had to recess the Recit into another room (usually in the tower) above and behind the existing case. If you look very carefully at the pics of St. Sulpice, you can see that HUGE swell box front ABOVE the case.   Many recitalists who've played at St. Sulpice have commented that it's a good idea to pay attention to the Titulaire's registrations for things .... one does NOT hear what's really going on from the console. That Recit goes barrelling down that nave like an express train (grin).   Schweitzer made two good points about C-C Recits (which he probably got from Widor and the St. Sulpice organ):   1. With the manuals coupled, all the 8' fonds drawn, and with the hands on the G.O., one should be able to hear a marked crescendo and decrescendo when the Recit shutters are opened and closed, with or without the Hautbois being drawn.   [Since the smaller C-C at St. Clotilde lacked an 8' Diapason in the Recit, Franck was forever calling for the Hautbois to beef up the sound of the Recit fonds. The debate continues whether one should do that when playing Franck on larger organs with sufficient 8' fonds.]   2. The same should be true of the full organ -- one should be able to hear a marked crescendo and decrescendo when the Recit box is opened and closed with the Recit fonds et anches drawn, EVEN if Positif, G.O. and Pedale ALSO have fonds et anches drawn, and one is playing on the G.O..   That's a pretty tall order (grin) ... but those old French organs can DO = it.   It occurs to me just now that may be why Jack Bethards and a few others (Nichols & Simpson?) have resorted to double-enclosing their loudest and softest stops, rather than building super-thick or remote/recessed single swell boxes ... in order to produce the same effect.   I note that the Brick Church Casavant is to have VERY thick boxes and shutters, compared to what most builders have been doing in recent years.   A big high-pressure Harmonic Trumpet behind TWO sets of swell shutters would be "caged rage" indeed (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud   T.Desiree' Hines wrote:   > I have a question for Bud, or any other listers that can offer insight. > This is also a partial confession. > > While I do not play the Franck A Minor (Good luck to my friend > Bernadette) I did learn it as an intensive study with a teacher. > > When I was learning it with that teacher, there was one place where the > registration was different than I had usually heard, but I did so to > appease that teacher. This was at the, I dare call it, resatement of the =   > opening theme after the chorale is stated (The modulatory section > leading to the adagio, with the pedal droning at low A). In this > section, the manuals are P or PP, if im correct. What should one do with =   > the pedal registration at this point? I was taught by that teacher to do =   > absolutely nothing to the pedal registration, as the pedal reeds would > still be on. > > Just eager to get some thoughts > > TDH > > > From Desiree' > T. Desiree' Hines > Chicago, IL 60610 > ---------------------------- > For Compositions by Desiree' > Frog Music Press > www.frogmusic.com > ------------------------------- > FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' > http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around > http://mail.yahoo.com >      
(back) Subject: Re: "caged rage" and C-C swell boxes From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 03:48:55 EDT     In a message dated 10/18/04 2:21:06 AM, quilisma@cox.net writes:     > > C-C virtually invented the "caged rage" sound of Full Swell to Reeds > with the box closed ... he was inspired in part by the permanently > boxed-in Echo divisions of the late Spanish baroque organs, and those > glorious Spanish reeds ... the C-C family is from a border province ... > the English got it from C-C ... or they invented it simultaneously, or > whatever (chuckle), depending on who tells the story (grin) >   I thought it was Abraham Jordan, 1712-St. Magnus the Martyr--could be = wrong though.       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Shofar, etc. From: <Joshwwhite@aol.com> Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 03:50:35 EDT   It is funny that this should come up, Roy, and the rest of the employees at the shop just finished = renovating an E.M. Skinner console, to replace the old console at Temple Sinai, in = New Orleans. The organ is a 1927 E.M. Skinner, and the original console was replaced with an Austin console some time ago. Roy has been there all = week completing the installation. Also included in this project was the = extension of the original pedal Shofar to be playable at 8' in the manual, and if I am = not mistaken at 4' also. The restored console turned out to be magnificant. =   Truly a work of art in itself. I have not encountered a Shofar stop before this, and I am surprised =   that it is not listed in Irwin's Dictionary of Pipe Organ Stops. Josh White  
(back) Subject: Re: "caged rage" and C-C swell boxes From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 00:59:47 -0700   Like I said ... depends on who tells the story (grin).   I think C-C might get credit for the FULL-COMPASS Swell ... St. Magnus was undoubtedly a short-compass keyboard beginning either at middle c or tenor f or g ... I forget now. Appleton was still building short-compass Swells in America well into the 19th century, and "Unison Basses" were common even later, even on full-compass keyboards.   Or Willis or Hill could have come up with it simultaneously with C-C ... doesn't really matter ... it's essential to French romantic music, and Anglican service-playing.   Cheers,   Bud   Gfc234@aol.com wrote:   > > In a message dated 10/18/04 2:21:06 AM, quilisma@cox.net writes: > > >> >> C-C virtually invented the "caged rage" sound of Full Swell to Reeds >> with the box closed ... he was inspired in part by the permanently >> boxed-in Echo divisions of the late Spanish baroque organs, and those >> glorious Spanish reeds ... the C-C family is from a border province ... >> the English got it from C-C ... or they invented it simultaneously, or >> whatever (chuckle), depending on who tells the story (grin) > > > > I thought it was Abraham Jordan, 1712-St. Magnus the Martyr--could be > wrong though. > > > > Gregory Ceurvorst > 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS > Evanston, IL 60201 > 847.332.2788 home/fax > 708.243.2549 mobile > gfc234@aol.com > gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net