PipeChat Digest #4845 - Wednesday, October 20, 2004
 
Re:      Boston Symphony Hall Open House, it's all about the organ
  by <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Olympic Tune
  by "Shawn M. Gingrich" <shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org>
Re: Boston Symphony Hall Open House, it's all about the organ
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Organ music publishers (cross posted)
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
re: economy of movement
  by "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at>
Re: Kimball rededication kindles memories
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: economy of movement
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Vienesse pivo (Off Topic)
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Vienesse pivo (Off Topic)
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Boston Symphony Hall Open House, it's all about the organ From: <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 21:05:15 +0200   Thanks to Charlie Jack for this publication. Meanwhile I received the actual program, which I have pasted in below Hans-Friedrich Hell   Symphony Hall Open House, Sunday November 7, 2004   MAIN STAGE: A CELEBRATION OF SYMPHONY HALL=92S ORGAN   12:00noon Doors open; tours of Symphony Hall start immediately   12:30pm Works for solo organ by J. S. Bach, Dupr=E9, Liszt, Mendelssohn, and Rheinberger (55') Felix Hell, organ   1:30pm The Frozen North (1922), by Buster Keaton silent short film screening with organ accompaniment (20=92) Jeff Weiler, organ   1:50pm Organ Dedication Ceremony (10=92)   2:00pm Works for brass & organ (30=92) James Levine, conductor James David Christie, organ Members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra=92s brass section   2:45pm A conversation with James Levine Mark Volpe, moderator (40=92)   3:30pm Baseball tunes (10=92) Josh Kantor, Red Sox Fenway Park organist, organ   3:45pm Organ Demonstration (25=92) by Foley-Baker   4:15pm Works for solo organ by J.S. Bach, Flagler, Nyman, Wagner, and Widor (50=92) Thomas Trotter, organ   5:15pm Choral =93audience=94 sing-along (30=92) James David Christie, organ Tanglewood Festival Chorus, John Oliver, conductor   6:00pm The Haunted House (1921), by Buster Keaton silent short film screening with organ accompaniment (20=92) Jeff Weiler, organ   6:30pm GUILMANT: Symphony No. 1, for organ and orchestra (25=92) Felix Hell, organ Jens Georg Bachmann, conductor NEC Philharmonia   7:00pm Nosferatu (1922), by F.W. Murnau, silent film screening with organ accompaniment (first screen adaptation of Bram Stoker=92s Dracula, 90=92) Jeff Weiler, organ   8:30pm estimated end to day   Updated October 20, 2004   -----Original Message----- Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 04:40:57 +0200 Subject: Boston Symphony Hall Open House, it's all about the organ From: Charlie Jack <Charlie@Jack.NET> To: PipeChat@PipeChat.org   The Boston Symphony will be holding an open house at Symphony Hall in Boston on Sunday November 7th starting at noon and running into the evening. This year the open house is all about the newly restored A/S organ. Thomas Trotter, Felix Hell, James David Christie and Jeff Weiler will perform during the course of the day. Once I learn the full schedule for the day I'll post it. I will also endeavor to get the updated specification and post that as well.   The following is the announcement from the BSO concerning the open house.   Charlie Jack Charlie@Jack.NET   Symphony Hall Open House on Sunday, November 7, to Feature Newly Renovated Symphony Hall Organ   On Sunday, November 7, Symphony Hall will once again open its doors, providing the greater Boston community an opportunity to welcome James Levine as BSO Music Director and witness the dedication of the newly renovated Symphony Hall organ. The day's events, running from noon to about 8:30 p.m., will include a wide variety of performances and activities appealing to all ages and musical tastes. Members of the BSO and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus will perform, as will such local ensembles as the New England Conservatory Philharmonia. James Levine will lead music for brass and organ featuring the BSO brass section and organist James David Christie, and there will be an organ-accompanied sing-along with the Tanglewood Festival Chorus led by its conductor John Oliver. Maestro Levine will also participate in an informal interview moderated by BSO Managing Director Mark Volpe. The organ will be showcased in recitals by the up-and-coming young German organist Felix Hell and acclaimed English organist Thomas Trotter, in silent film screenings accompanied by Jeff Weiler, and in a rendition of baseball tunes by a Red Sox organist from Fenway Park. Events elsewhere in the building will include chamber music performances and instrument demonstrations. In addition, the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers will offer tours of historic Symphony Hall throughout the day and staff an Instrument Petting Zoo for children. The 2004 Symphony Hall Open House is sponsored by UBS.   The Aeolian-Skinner organ, Opus 1134, is one of Symphony Hall's most prominent features. Built in 1947 to replace the Hall's original Hutchings organ of 1900, the instrument was designed by G. Donald Harrison, President and Tonal Director of Aeolian-Skinner of Boston, the preeminent American organ builders during the first half of the twentieth century. When first installed, it was widely recognized as one of the most versatile concert hall organs in the world. Inaugural concerts with the BSO took place in October 1949 with renowned organist E. Power Biggs at the keyboard, and organ recitals were for many years a regular feature of Symphony Hall programming.   Completed this past summer, the renovation of the Symphony Hall organ began in January 2003, when the entire organ including some 5,000 pipes was removed from the organ chamber, which has itself been completely refurbished. The renovated organ---now incorporating some new pipes and divisions, as well as a new console design---was reinstalled during the summer of 2003; tonal finishing and tuning was completed in the summer of 2004. Of equal importance to the renovation of the organ was the establishment of a permanently endowed fund for its care, enabling the BSO to remedy mechanical problems common to the aging process as they occur, and to undertake necessary cleaning and other maintenance on a regular basis.   During the 2004-2005 season, the organ is also featured in the BSO performances of Mahler's Symphony No. 8 that inaugurate James Levine's tenure as BSO Music Director in October, and in the season-closing performances of Respighi's Pines of Rome and Fountains of Rome under Rafael Fr<FC>hbeck de Burgos next May. It will also be used in Mr. Levine's November BSO performances of the final scene from Salome featuring soprano Karita Mattila.   -- Charlie Jack Charlie@Jack.NET   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>     -----Original Message----- Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 04:33:19 +0200 Subject: Boston Symphony Hall Open House, it's all about the organ From: Charlie Jack <Charlie@jack.net> To: PIPORG-L@LISTSERV.ALBANY.EDU   The Boston Symphony will be holding an open house at Symphony Hall in Boston on Sunday November 7th starting at noon and running into the evening. This year the open house is all about the newly restored A/S organ. Thomas Trotter, Felix Hell, James David Christie and Jeff Weiler will perform during the course of the day. Once I learn the full schedule for the day I'll post it. I will also endeavor to get the updated specification and post that as well.   The following is the announcement from the BSO concerning the open house.   Charlie Jack     Symphony Hall Open House on Sunday, November 7, to Feature Newly Renovated Symphony Hall Organ   On Sunday, November 7, Symphony Hall will once again open its doors, providing the greater Boston community an opportunity to welcome James Levine as BSO Music Director and witness the dedication of the newly renovated Symphony Hall organ. The day's events, running from noon to about 8:30 p.m., will include a wide variety of performances and activities appealing to all ages and musical tastes. Members of the BSO and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus will perform, as will such local ensembles as the New England Conservatory Philharmonia. James Levine will lead music for brass and organ featuring the BSO brass section and organist James David Christie, and there will be an organ-accompanied sing-along with the Tanglewood Festival Chorus led by its conductor John Oliver. Maestro Levine will also participate in an informal interview moderated by BSO Managing Director Mark Volpe. The organ will be showcased in recitals by the up-and-coming young German organist Felix Hell and acclaimed English organist Thomas Trotter, in silent film screenings accompanied by Jeff Weiler, and in a rendition of baseball tunes by a Red Sox organist from Fenway Park. Events elsewhere in the building will include chamber music performances and instrument demonstrations. In addition, the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers will offer tours of historic Symphony Hall throughout the day and staff an Instrument Petting Zoo for children. The 2004 Symphony Hall Open House is sponsored by UBS. The Aeolian-Skinner organ, Opus 1134, is one of Symphony Hall's most prominent features. Built in 1947 to replace the Hall's original Hutchings organ of 1900, the instrument was designed by G. Donald Harrison, President and Tonal Director of Aeolian-Skinner of Boston, the preeminent American organ builders during the first half of the twentieth century. When first installed, it was widely recognized as one of the most versatile concert hall organs in the world. Inaugural concerts with the BSO took place in October 1949 with renowned organist E. Power Biggs at the keyboard, and organ recitals were for many years a regular feature of Symphony Hall programming. Completed this past summer, the renovation of the Symphony Hall organ began in January 2003, when the entire organ including some 5,000 pipes was removed from the organ chamber, which has itself been completely refurbished. The renovated organ---now incorporating some new pipes and divisions, as well as a new console design---was reinstalled during the summer of 2003; tonal finishing and tuning was completed in the summer of 2004. Of equal importance to the renovation of the organ was the establishment of a permanently endowed fund for its care, enabling the BSO to remedy mechanical problems common to the aging process as they occur, and to undertake necessary cleaning and other maintenance on a regular basis. During the 2004-2005 season, the organ is also featured in the BSO performances of Mahler's Symphony No. 8 that inaugurate James Levine's tenure as BSO Music Director in October, and in the season-closing performances of Respighi's Pines of Rome and Fountains of Rome under Rafael Fr=FChbeck de Burgos next May. It will also be used in Mr. Levine's November BSO performances of the final scene from Salome featuring soprano Karita Mattila.   :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Note: opinions expressed on PIPORG-L are those of the individual con- tributors and not necessarily those of the list owners nor of the Uni- versity at Albany. For a brief summary of list commands, send mail to listserv@listserv.albany.edu saying GET LSVCMMDS.TXT or see the web page at http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/lsvcmmds.html .       -----Original Message----- Date: Sat, 16 Oct 2004 04:33:19 +0200 Subject: Boston Symphony Hall Open House, it's all about the organ From: Charlie Jack <Charlie@jack.net> To: PIPORG-L@LISTSERV.ALBANY.EDU   The Boston Symphony will be holding an open house at Symphony Hall in Boston on Sunday November 7th starting at noon and running into the evening. This year the open house is all about the newly restored A/S organ. Thomas Trotter, Felix Hell, James David Christie and Jeff Weiler will perform during the course of the day. Once I learn the full schedule for the day I'll post it. I will also endeavor to get the updated specification and post that as well.   The following is the announcement from the BSO concerning the open house.   Charlie Jack     Symphony Hall Open House on Sunday, November 7, to Feature Newly Renovated Symphony Hall Organ   On Sunday, November 7, Symphony Hall will once again open its doors, providing the greater Boston community an opportunity to welcome James Levine as BSO Music Director and witness the dedication of the newly renovated Symphony Hall organ. The day's events, running from noon to about 8:30 p.m., will include a wide variety of performances and activities appealing to all ages and musical tastes. Members of the BSO and the Tanglewood Festival Chorus will perform, as will such local ensembles as the New England Conservatory Philharmonia. James Levine will lead music for brass and organ featuring the BSO brass section and organist James David Christie, and there will be an organ-accompanied sing-along with the Tanglewood Festival Chorus led by its conductor John Oliver. Maestro Levine will also participate in an informal interview moderated by BSO Managing Director Mark Volpe. The organ will be showcased in recitals by the up-and-coming young German organist Felix Hell and acclaimed English organist Thomas Trotter, in silent film screenings accompanied by Jeff Weiler, and in a rendition of baseball tunes by a Red Sox organist from Fenway Park. Events elsewhere in the building will include chamber music performances and instrument demonstrations. In addition, the Boston Symphony Association of Volunteers will offer tours of historic Symphony Hall throughout the day and staff an Instrument Petting Zoo for children. The 2004 Symphony Hall Open House is sponsored by UBS. The Aeolian-Skinner organ, Opus 1134, is one of Symphony Hall's most prominent features. Built in 1947 to replace the Hall's original Hutchings organ of 1900, the instrument was designed by G. Donald Harrison, President and Tonal Director of Aeolian-Skinner of Boston, the preeminent American organ builders during the first half of the twentieth century. When first installed, it was widely recognized as one of the most versatile concert hall organs in the world. Inaugural concerts with the BSO took place in October 1949 with renowned organist E. Power Biggs at the keyboard, and organ recitals were for many years a regular feature of Symphony Hall programming. Completed this past summer, the renovation of the Symphony Hall organ began in January 2003, when the entire organ including some 5,000 pipes was removed from the organ chamber, which has itself been completely refurbished. The renovated organ---now incorporating some new pipes and divisions, as well as a new console design---was reinstalled during the summer of 2003; tonal finishing and tuning was completed in the summer of 2004. Of equal importance to the renovation of the organ was the establishment of a permanently endowed fund for its care, enabling the BSO to remedy mechanical problems common to the aging process as they occur, and to undertake necessary cleaning and other maintenance on a regular basis. During the 2004-2005 season, the organ is also featured in the BSO performances of Mahler's Symphony No. 8 that inaugurate James Levine's tenure as BSO Music Director in October, and in the season-closing performances of Respighi's Pines of Rome and Fountains of Rome under Rafael Fr=FChbeck de Burgos next May. It will also be used in Mr. Levine's November BSO performances of the final scene from Salome featuring soprano Karita Mattila.   :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Note: opinions expressed on PIPORG-L are those of the individual con- tributors and not necessarily those of the list owners nor of the Uni- versity at Albany. For a brief summary of list commands, send mail to listserv@listserv.albany.edu saying GET LSVCMMDS.TXT or see the web page at http://www.albany.edu/piporg-l/lsvcmmds.html . ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::      
(back) Subject: Olympic Tune From: "Shawn M. Gingrich" <shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 15:18:44 -0400   Does anyone know the exact title / composer of the tune used for the Olympics? The tune is: Mi_ Sol_ Sol Do Re Mi Do   -------|\----- Shawn M. Gingrich, Director of Music Ministry -------|/----- First United Methodist Church ------/|------ Hershey, PA 17033 -----|-(-)---- 717-533-9668 ext. 108 ------\|/----- shawn.gingrich@firstumchershey.org o/ http://fumc-hershey.org      
(back) Subject: Re: Boston Symphony Hall Open House, it's all about the organ From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 15:27:26 EDT   Dear List,   How appropriate (let's hope) that Fenway organist Josh Kantor will be = playing at the Symphony Hall open house on the 7th November!   The other week, I buried "happy birthday" deep in an improvisation during = the incensation of the altar at the offertory to honor one of our beloved = veteran parishioners who was once a Cowley Father. Halfway through, the choir indicated "it's not obvious enough!", and I did bring it out enough for = dear old Father Bob to notice. Thank goodness we practice our Anglo-Catholicism = with a healthy sense of humor at St. John's!   Perhaps I'll have a good reason to bury "Take Me Out To the Ballgame" in = THIS Sunday's improvisation!   Hoping to Reverse the Curse,   Bill H. SJE, Boston.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ music publishers (cross posted) From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 15:05:45 -0500   Stephen Best wrote:   > Hi everyone, > > I've written a few things for organ that people I respect think may be > worth publishing. Here's the question: is it appropriate to submit > the same music to several different publishers at the same time?   The only case in which I would do this is if you were writing one composition as a portfolio piece, to send along with the advice that the work is included as a portfolio piece, and is not being offered for publication, but simply so they can evaluate your general skill and compositional style. Otherwise, NO.   What I would recommend is sending a letter to each publisher you are contemplating offering the works to, describing the works, you propose to offer them, and asking if there is anything they would consider to be a suitable match for their catalog. If you get a postive reply, send what they request.   ns  
(back) Subject: re: economy of movement From: "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 22:24:17 +0200   Dear Listmembers,   I am just a hobby organist, but I took classes with various teachers (Alexander Neumann, Elmo Cosentini and now Jan Blahuta) and play regularly = on European organs, new and historic ones. Prof. Neumann was a pupil of = Dupre, Elmo Cosentini and Jan Blahuta have diplomas from the University of Performing Arts Vienna and Bratislava.   Except for historic organs, German, Austrian and many other modern = European organs are standardized according to the BDO standard (Bund Deutscher Orgelbauer =3D Association of German Organ Builders). BDO standard is a = flat pedal.   I have never seen an organist moving in the way Walcha is said to have = moved (i.e. to the Benchs end) so that must have been a very special exception. = All my organ teachers taught me to sit as still as possible an move just what = is absolutely necessary. The popular organ schools (Friedhelm Deiss, Heinrich =   Keller, and Kaller) also advocate that.   The main reason why European organists prefer to play toe - toe and not = toe heel is simply that the toe is capable of a better control of the attack = and articulation than the heel.   regards, Thomas     -- DI Thomas Mohr Institute for Cancer Research Medical University of Vienna Borschkegasse 8a A-1090 Vienna   ++43 1 4277 65160  
(back) Subject: Re: Kimball rededication kindles memories From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 17:14:07 EDT   In a message dated 10/20/2004 10:22:09 AM Eastern Daylight Time, Wuxuzusu@aol.com writes: Good friend organist Marc Peters remembered, and Clark Wilson verified, an =   earlier concert (mid '70s) which featured William Haller at the von = Beckerath (?) and Dennis James at the Kimball (?) playing "Ride of the Valkyries!" = I'd love to hear that once again with both the Kimball and von B in top shape = and the room at its accoustical best. Remember, Rudolph von Beckerath would not install his organ in that room until the church made some major = accoustical alterations. I'm not sure what shape the Kimball was in for the = Haller/James duet. The Tuba Magna (if that is what it is called - solo Tuba?) on the Kimball = by itself is able to obliterate the full plenum of the VonTrackerbreath in = the rear gallery. I was also at the concert with Wm Haller and Dennis James, = and even with the Kimball only about 50 percent functional is was QUITE = dominant in the room when comparing the Kimball and the Von Beckerath...gimme the = Kimball any day of the week.   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Re: economy of movement From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 17:42:42 EDT   Lieber Thomas, u.a.!   During my several years living in Vienna (not studying organ, alas--just a =   lowly student of Composition with a concentration in Beisl [=3Dpub]), I = played several organs with a DBO standard pedalboard as well as a few rather old instruments. While I learned on the AGO standard here in the US, I had = little difficulty adapting to this. I feel that doing what works, musically, and = is as accurate as possible, is the best method. Of course, I don't claim 100% = accuracy, especially after an evening enjoying a little too much beer (Pivo, if you = want to get REALLY Viennese) at the Beisl.   Pfiat di!   Bill H. SJE, Boston  
(back) Subject: Vienesse pivo (Off Topic) From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 21 Oct 2004 00:53:00 +0200   DERREINETOR@aol.com wrote: I don't claim 100% accuracy, > especially after an evening enjoying a little too much beer (Pivo, if = you want > to get REALLY Viennese) at the Beisl.   Funny. I'm wondering why is it called "Pivo"? Maybe due to Slavic influence -- in Polish it's "Piwo", which happens to be one of the about 50 Polish words I know.   - Czy masz piwo? (Do you have beer?) - Nie mam piwa! (I don't have beer!)   czy =3D marker to make a yes/no question masz =3D you have mam =3D I have nie =3D no, not piwa =3D beer (in the genitive, which is always used for denials!)   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no  
(back) Subject: Re: Vienesse pivo (Off Topic) From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 18:58:04 EDT     In a message dated 10/20/04 5:46:35 PM, jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk = writes:     > Funny. I'm wondering why is it called "Pivo"? Maybe due to Slavic > influence -- in Polish it's "Piwo", which happens to be one of the about > 50 Polish words I know. > >   I wonder which others you know LOLOL cheers, gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net