PipeChat Digest #4859 - Saturday, October 30, 2004
 
Re: Small Organs...without shades.
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: The Ebay Organ, and the future or pipe organ culture
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Small Organs...without shades.
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Small Organs...without shades.
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Small Organs...without shades.
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
...the future or pipe organ (and all Western) culture
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
No funerals before the 18th century
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Small Organs...without shades.
  by "Mack" <mack02445@comcast.net>
funerals without swell shades, etc.
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Small Organs...without shades.
  by "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com>
Re: funerals without swell shades, etc.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
organs without swell boxes
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Russian Contakion of the Departed
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Contakion, p.s.
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Russian Contakion of the Departed
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Music List: First United Lutheran Hammond, IN
  by "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Boston Symphony Hall Open House, it's all about the organ
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Terror Targets Organ
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Terror Targets Organ
  by "Matthew N. Chegezy" <mcheg101@comcast.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Small Organs...without shades. From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 05:58:33 EDT   In a message dated 10/29/2004 11:25:21 PM Eastern Standard Time,=20 gedeckt@usit.net writes: A former dean of the AGO turned to me and said. "How can you play a=20 funeral on an organ wthout shades?" Very well, IMO. We had enough room in our chapel for pipes OR shades, not=20 both. We opted for pipes, and they work just fine. The specification is ba= sed=20 on useful stops for service playing, and the facade can be seen on the Organ= =20 Supply Industries website. The 7 ranks over two manuals are:   16 Rohrfulte 8 Hohlfulte 8 Salicional 8 Celeste 8 Principal 4 Gemshorn 8 Hautbois   Our next addition this winter (as a memorial)? You guessed right =E2=80=94=20= chimes!     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: The Ebay Organ, and the future or pipe organ culture From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 07:31:40 EDT   >While this situation is a shame, keep in mind that many a pipe organ has =   >been destroyed, heaped at the curb, or carted to a landfill because of = an >organist, not because of a Session, a Board, or a Vestry. > Hundreds of average pipe organs that were perfectly adequate for = fifty, >seventy, or a hundred years have been sent to their deaths by = organ-players who >convinced the instruments' owners to replace the pipe organs with large >electronics or completely new real organs.   The sad thing is that the church board (whatever it may be called) more often than not, generally doesn't bother to ever check with another source = to see if there is anything worth salvaging from the existing pipe organ, and = when they do, they often have the church organist call in an "expert" that the =   organist knows who will back up their opinion, so the organist will get = their way. I heard of a case recently where a digital company's rep was giving = a report on the status of a pipe organ in a church. I doubt that the rep = had been apprenticed to a pipe organ shop and could really tell the full potential =   left in the pipe organ. His plan was to take out the pipe organ = completely and replace it with a fully digital organ, according to the organist's = wishes. >I have heard church music employees rant and rave about what they = deserve >and require, how they cannot negotiate a simple Mass or liturgy without = the >now-standard 128 levels of memory (how much music DO they have in their >repertoire?), couplers from everywhere to everywhere at every pitch (required for >WHAT music?), five pairs of "celestes" (absolutely essential to the Lutheran >worship service), or four 32' stops. They profoundly resent the = injustice of not >having a choice of eight different fanfare trumpets stored in a = computer.   This is all a matter of convenience--mulitple memories are a Godsend when =   you do 5 or 6 anthems a weekend in a services like I do, plus preludes and = postlude (sometimes different preludes and postludes at each service). = When there are also concerts and guest artists coming in to rehearse and = practice, it just makes it easier to not have to reset everytime someone plays. It's = easy enough to install multiple memories, why not use them? Multiple celestes in a Lutheran service--that is not necessary in MOST cases. In a Baptist church, however, it's a different story. In a = Methodist church, it's probably a different story, too, even in a Presbyterian = church, it's probably a different story. 8 digital fanfare trumpets--give me the real =   thing, and give me one good one. I have one chamade, I use it fairly = often, but it's not an every week thing. It's an artistic judgement-it needs to = be used sparingly. >Many organs ARE rebuilt and enlarged from time to time. Evolved >instruments are a tradition, and one might argue that they are a natural =   outgrowth of >the evolution of musical culture. Yet the ones we most revere are just that: >they are evolved, retaining and respecting the best of what was there, = and >building upon that foundation. > Another facet of the successfully evolved organ is that size is not = the >objective -- quality is. Whenever I have seen an organ aggrandized to excess, >quality almost always suffers. Such organs simply grow, they do not = DEVELOP.   My church chose to build a large new organ for our new church because we = had the money to do so from the outset, because we didn't want to spend money =   retrofitting things later. We wanted to do it once and do it right. We = didn't want to have to do a hodge-podge enlargement down the road. Just like = the new church building, we wanted to get the organ, do it quality, and then = not have to worry, so money could go into ministry programs. Of course, = there is always maintenance, but we won't have to worry about finding money to add =   this and that and the other--it will already be there. I won't have to = find money to add the 8' Choir Trumpet or the Pedal 16' Gemshorn, or = whatever... The Ladies Quilting circle won't have to have a fundraiser to install the zimbelstern. >More often than not, it is the organist who hires the hobbyist to >refurbish a pipe organ "on the cheap," with disastrous results. The = church has placed >their trust in the presumed professional judgement of their organist.   What is scary is that there are "organbuilders" out there who go around = and build instruments "on the cheap" but take churches for all sorts of money = and then the churches have to go back a few years later and spend a ton to fix = what should have been done correctly in the first place. There were two = local "builders" here in the Charlotte area like that, and one in southern California, where I went to college. Thank God they are out of business. = They come in and tout all sorts of expertise, and unfortunately church boards and = the organists buy their lines, but as I experienced, 10 years later, the = organs fail--and the organbuilder is out of business and living on a commune in California as a member of the Church of Scientology, and my church has no = recourse. The whole thing comes down to education...but how do you educate a church =   board about the matter of the pipe organ? They don't want to be = bothered? Most organists are such know it alls they wouldn't care to learn = more--since they know more than the organ builder anyway. While we were doing our = project, I asked questions, read books, did internet research, etc., and am still learning...it's an ongoing process, and a rather interesting and fun one = at that. We could have consultants in on every project, but I've seen churches hire = consultants that are not in tune with their style of worship or music. = That is detrimental to a music program. I know of a Baptist church north of = my area who has hired a consultant who is from a liturgical background. The = guy has never been to a Baptist church before and doesn't understand the need = for the kind of flexibility needed in a Baptist service...he didn't = understand the reason that the organ builder had specified an Echo division with several =   soft celestes. (I know the organ builder and the church involved, so = I've seen the stop list.) The specification was sort of early American Classic, = very much in the GDH style of the early 1930's. The consultant told the = church that there was no need for them to have more than two celestes and he questioned the need of the Echo division, as well as several other = things. It was obvious that he had never been to a Baptist church that did a WIDE gamut = of music, as his church does mainly one style of music. I asked the = consultant if he had been to the church to visit, and was met with a blank stare--his response, after he stammered a little, was, "well, um...no." This is not = to question his capabilities or knowledge, just the appropriateness of the = consultant and church matchup. Churches need to take lots of things into consideration when they start looking at rebuilding or replacing their instruments, but we as organists = need to have lots of information for our church boards. We can't just go in haphazardly flinging sales brochures. Sometimes it might be best to start = with a new organ, sometimes it might be best to rebuild...and yes, sometimes it = might be good to go digital. No matter what the case, we have to have the = facts and the education to back up the facts. Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Small Organs...without shades. From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 08:08:52 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, October 30, 2004 12:23 AM Subject: Re: Small Organs...without shades.     > What's wrong with an organ without shades?   Well apart from the inability to perform crescendi and diminuendi (or = should it be descrescendi?), which is a minor inconvenience, it makes it = impossible to match the volume of the organ to the volume of the singers when accompanying.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: Small Organs...without shades. From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 08:07:27 -0600   Hello, Morton: > Au contraire, this summer I subbed on an organ at a > church... I left the Swell Organ shades completely > open during the whole service... Why? well I must > confess one reason is that as my right foot was not in > good condition, I could not open and close the > expression pedal that readily... Fortunately when it > was necessary to play on the Swell alone I usually > used two beatifully voiced stops at my disposal > (Salicional 8', actually a wonderful Salicional 8' > Diapason that I could have played on forever without > tiring, and the Voix Celeste 8' together with the > Salicional 8')... I can hear these stops in my mind. Can you give us an idea of a few samples that you would play on these stops (style, not necessarily pieces of literature), because I have talked positively about using stops/combinations like this to be hooted at by fellows who insist that sounds like that might be conisdered much too luscious, schmaltzy. Not being critical, just curious.   F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Small Organs...without shades. From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 09:57:09 -0500   A clever organist would create a crescendo by adding more notes, or a decrescendo by subtracting notes. Bach did it all the time in his music, building up chords from one note to many and then many notes to one. = Great way to use dynamics on the organ. Pipes don't naturally get louder on = their own!   Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net    
(back) Subject: ...the future or pipe organ (and all Western) culture From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 11:11:11 EDT   Seems as though this attitude prevails throughout contemporary society. Consider today's politicians, CEOs, CFOs, insurance moguls, movie stars, = SUV owners, etc. Bigger is better at all costs, it seems. Quality of life be = damned.   I guess the church and its various employees do reflect the contemporary attitudes.   I hope I'm proven wrong.   Stan Krider   In a message dated 10/29/2004 11:23:21 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Sebastian = M. Gluck writes: I have heard church music employees rant and rave about what they deserve and require, how they cannot negotiate a simple Mass or liturgy without = the now-standard 128 levels of memory (how much music DO they have in their repertoire?), couplers from everywhere to everywhere at every pitch (required for WHAT music?), five pairs of "celestes" (absolutely essential = to the Lutheran worship service), or four 32' stops. They profoundly resent the injustice = of not having a choice of eight different fanfare trumpets stored in a = computer. Most organ music was written for organs of two or three manuals that controlled thirty to fifty ranks of pipes. Most of the concert literature was written for no combination action, or with a rudimentary one at best. = Most of the music we know and love was written for organs that bore no 32' = stops. Yet the abhorrent insult of being denied such things when we require them... Oddly, when a pipe organ is junked because it is allegedly inadequate = to serve the needs of such a brilliant and accomplished musician, nobody = seems to ask why such a skilled and scient artist cannot make a small instrument "jump through hoops," as the greats of the past did. Many organs ARE rebuilt and enlarged from time to time. Evolved instruments are a tradition, and one might argue that they are a natural outgrowth of the evolution of musical culture. Yet the ones we most revere are just = that: they are evolved, retaining and respecting the best of what was there, and =   building upon that foundation. Another facet of the successfully evolved organ is that size is not = the objective -- quality is. Whenever I have seen an organ aggrandized to excess, quality almost always suffers. Such organs simply grow, they do = not DEVELOP. More often than not, it is the organist who hires the hobbyist to refurbish a pipe organ "on the cheap," with disastrous results. The church has placed their trust in the presumed professional judgement of their organist. Ignorant groups of people frequently make mistakes based upon the = advice of those who claim to be experts, basing their decisions on the trust they =   place in the professed expertise of those whose guidance they seek.  
(back) Subject: No funerals before the 18th century From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 12:24:08 EDT   What a shame.  
(back) Subject: Re: Small Organs...without shades. From: "Mack" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 12:45:03 +0000   Scott, Tthe quote is correct but the source is wrong. E.P. Biggs said it years ago, its on his Album "The Organ". Lets keep the facts straight. Mack   Scott Montgomery wrote:   > I remember a something Barone said on Pipedreams many years > ago....."One pipe out in the open is worth two in a box." (Or > something like that)      
(back) Subject: funerals without swell shades, etc. From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 10:14:10 -0700   Well, let's see ... what do I play at funerals?   Bach - Sinfonia from "God's Time Is Best" Bach - Sheep May Safely Graze Bach - Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring Bach - Before Thy Throne (Great Eighteen) Bach - Out of the Depths (Clavieruebung III) Bach - Canzona in d minor Bach - Pastorale in F (third movement in c minor) Bach - Adagio (Prelude, Adagio and Fugue in C) Bach - "Little" Prelude and Fugue in e minor Bach - Dearest Jesu, We Are Here (various) Bach - When In The Hour of Utmost Need (Orgelbuechlein) Bach - Hark! A Voice Saith All Are Mortal (Orgelbuechlein) Handel - Dead March from "Saul" Handel - Aria in F (forget which concerto; it's in the Concordia Wedding Book) Krebs - Lord, All My Hope Is Fixed On Thee Walther - Jesu, Priceless Treasure (selected movements of the partita)   Service Music:   BURIAL OFFICE   Opening Sentences - Stainer/Merbecke or Croft Psalms - Anglican Chant   REQUIEM MASS   Introit - plainsong, Casciolini, or fauxbourdon Kyrie - plainsong or Casciolini Psalm - Anglican Chant Offertory - Justorum animae (by local custom) - various Sanctus - plainsong or Casciolini Lord's Prayer - Stone Agnus - plainsong or Casciolini Communion - plainsong with Psalm 23 (fauxbourdons)   ABSOLUTIONS   Responsory - Stainer/Merbecke (adapted to "I Know that My Redeemer Liveth" in the form given in The Priests' Manual) Antiphon "In paradisum" - plainsong   COMMENDATION   Closing Sentences - Stainer/Merbecke Anthem "I Heard A Voice From Heaven" - Stainer/Merbecke Contakion of the Dead - Russian   HYMNS   Jesus, Son of Mary - plainsong O God, Our Help in Ages Past - St. Anne Now the Labourer's Toils Are O'er - Pax A Mighty Fortress Is Our God - Ein feste Burg       Swell shades?   Pistons?   What for?   And the above is more music than is sung OR played at 99% of MOST = funerals.   The organ ACCOMPANIES the choir; the CHOIR makes the crescendos and decrescendos.   Monty is right on about one thing: of the four builders we consulted, only one bothered to come to church and hear what we actually DID in a service; afterwards, he said, "OK, I get it; now I know what the organ HAS to do, and what you WANT it to do."   *I* wouldn't specify an organ for an Anglican church without a swell box .... "caged rage" is too much a part of the Anglican service-playing tradition at this point ... but Anglican organists DID do without them quite handily until the 19th century (for the most part ... Abraham Jordan and his nag's-head Swell at St. Magnus the Martyr in 1710 or whenever notwithstanding) ... and one can certainly sing and play a classical Anglican service WITHOUT one.   This is NOT directed at anyone in particular ... but it seems to me that if a service has gotten to the point where it NEEDS 128 levels of memory and XXX number of stops, then it needs some pruning (grin) ... surely constant changes in styles of music and registration must produce a restless, disjointed feeling. After all, the focus IS supposed to be on the preaching of the Word (and the celebration of the Sacrament, in liturgical churches) ... music is the SERVANT of both, NOT the MASTER.   Cheers,   Bud                  
(back) Subject: Re: Small Organs...without shades. From: "Scott Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 12:29:46 -0500   E Power Biggs may have said it, but I heard M Barone say it on Pipedreams. =   So to clarify.....E Power Biggs said it, Barone quoted E Power Biggs on a Pipedreams show.   Scott Montgomery 619 W Church St. Champaign, IL 61820 217.390.0158 www.ScottMontgomeryMusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: funerals without swell shades, etc. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 14:12:27 -0400   On 10/30/04 1:14 PM, "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > Well, let's see ... what do I play at funerals?   Don't know WHEN I've read a better post=8Bon any subject. Nevertheless, late= r I'll post a few more hymn suggestions, since I was going to work on that this weekend anyway.   Bud: Would it be convenient for you to post the text of the Kontakion?   (In English, rather than Old Slavonic, if handy!)   Alan    
(back) Subject: organs without swell boxes From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 11:22:58 -0700   A caveat: the average American organ by the average American builder with pipes planted out in the open on "flower boxes" IS going to sound like hell.   Holtkamp the Elder and Schlicker got away with it (sometimes only JUST); other did (and do) not.   That's not what's being discussed here.   1. The organ case serves a PURPOSE, whether it contains a swell-box or = NOT.   2. There WERE some less-than-stellar 19th century American builders, but not many ... a couple with organs in the Cleveland/Pennsylvania area come to mind, but I can't remember names right now .. oh yeah ... Barckhoff, Felgemaker (grin). And I'd still take EITHER over an electronic substitute. They CAN be revoiced (chuckle).   3. The vast MAJORITY voiced their SMALLEST organs with the same care as they did their LARGEST organs. Even the "catalog" organs by Hinners, Erben, Hook, Estey, etc. sound GLORIOUS when compared to the average 4-rank unit organs of the 20th century.   4. Is it REALLY that difficult to study and reproduce their pipe-scales with modern electronic equipment? They KNEW how to make a beautiful sound in a dry or dead room; SURELY it can't be THAT difficult. THEY did it with 19th-century hand-tools and good ears ...   The restoration of the Home Moravian Church Tannenberg SHOULD be the occasion for a general ear-cleaning and re-evaluation of what organ-building is all about ... artistry, rather than bombast ... that may or may not happen.   Period-piece?   Yes.   The work of an artist?   Absolutely.       Cheers,   Bud          
(back) Subject: Russian Contakion of the Departed From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 11:34:30 -0700   English Hymnal, #744 ... I think there's a version with a modernized text in the Episcopal Hymnal 1982. Oddly enough, there's a tradition of singing this at the funerals of English royalty.       (Kiev melody)       R.   Give rest, O Christ, to thy servants with thy Saints: Where sorrow and pain are no more; Neither sighing, but life everlasting. (end of repeat)   V.   Thou only art Immortal, The Creator and Maker of man: And we are mortal, formed from the earth:   V.   And unto earth shall we return: For so thou didst ordain, When thou createdst us, saying,   V.   Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return. All we go down to the dust: and, weeping o'er the grave, we make our song:   Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.   R. Give rest ... life everlasting.   It's VERY effective sung in d minor with a single soprano singing the melody on "ah" very softly an octave above the choir from "Give rest" to the end of the Respond, as was done in the opening scene of "Dr. Zhivago."   I have it written out that way if anybody wants it, in a PDF file or Sibelius.   Cheers,   Bud   Alan Freed wrote:   > On 10/30/04 1:14 PM, "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote: > > >>Well, let's see ... what do I play at funerals? > > > Don't know WHEN I've read a better post=8Bon any subject. Nevertheless, = later > I'll post a few more hymn suggestions, since I was going to work on that > this weekend anyway. > > Bud: Would it be convenient for you to post the text of the Kontakion? > > (In English, rather than Old Slavonic, if handy!) > > Alan > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Contakion, p.s. From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 11:44:49 -0700   I see in looking at the actual music in the computer, we didn't "weep o'er the grave" (chuckle) ... that was a little TOO Russian.   We replaced that line with:   "Yet in sure and certain hope We make our song:   Alleluia," etc.      
(back) Subject: Re: Russian Contakion of the Departed From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 15:56:41 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, October 30, 2004 1:34 PM Subject: Russian Contakion of the Departed     > English Hymnal, #744 ... I think there's a version with a modernized > text in the Episcopal Hymnal 1982.   Yes, Hymn 355 in the Hymnal of 1982.   Oddly enough, there's a tradition of > singing this at the funerals of English royalty.   The Saxe-Coburgs (aka the Windsors) are of course related to the Romanovs, so perhaps it is not that strange.   There is also an arrangement of another very pleasant Kontakion (based on the Beatitudes -- not for funerals) in the Hymnal of 1982 -- No. 560.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Music List: First United Lutheran Hammond, IN From: "Beau Surratt" <Beau.Surratt@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 18:17:26 -0500     Reformation Day 2004 Music List ___________   Prelude- "Prelude on Ein feste Burg" Helmut Walcha   Processional Hymn "Christ Is Made the Sure Foundation" WESTMINSTER ABBEY, intro and harmonization by Hal Hopson   Hymn of the Day "Lord, Keep Us Steadfast in Your Word" ERHALT UNS HERR, intro by A. Steven Taranto; harmonizations by Michael Burkhardt   Offertory- "Christ Is Made the Sure Foundation" Dale Wood Adult Choir   Communion Hymns- "Listen God Is Calling" NENO LAKEM MUNGU "Seek Ye First" LAFFERTY "For the Bread Which You Have Broken" OMNI DIES   Sending Hymn- "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" EIN FESTE BURG sung in isometric version with the exception of stanza three which will be sung by the choir alone in the rhythmic version; free harmonization by John Ferguson   Postlude- "Toccata in d minor" J.S. Bach   Yes, THAT one! :)       First United Lutheran Church, ELCA 6705 Hohman Ave. Hammond, IN 46324 Rev. Dr. Basaam J. Abdallah, Pastor Beau Surratt, Director of Music and Organist      
(back) Subject: Re: Boston Symphony Hall Open House, it's all about the organ From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 21:39:48 EDT   Tommy,   Thanks for your warm wishes. The victory celebration in Boston today was quite impressive, I heard, but I, alas, was on retreat at the Convent of = St. Ann in Arlington--a good place to be, given how close to Fenway Park I live!   I think this week, I'll allude to "We Are The Champions" by Queen in my improv--given the age demographics of our parish, EVERYONE should get it!   Pax, Bill H. Boston  
(back) Subject: Terror Targets Organ From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 21:15:47 -0600   On tonight's local news: Bomb threat at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, supposedly placed 'under the organ' in one of the chapels.   What next! No respect for a house of worship nor the instruments of praise.   Fortunately, after evacuating the premesis, nothing was found.     David E   David Evangelides Fulfillment Manager International Bible Society 719-867-2729 (Sent by wireless T-Mobile Sidekick)  
(back) Subject: Re: Terror Targets Organ From: "Matthew N. Chegezy" <mcheg101@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 30 Oct 2004 23:29:41 -0400   It's a Moller...big loss!   M On Oct 30, 2004, at 11:15 PM, David Evangelides wrote:   > On tonight's local news: Bomb threat at the Air Force Academy in > Colorado Springs, supposedly placed 'under the organ' in one of the > chapels. > > What next! No respect for a house of worship nor the instruments of > praise. > > Fortunately, after evacuating the premesis, nothing was found. > > > David E > > David Evangelides > Fulfillment Manager > International Bible Society > 719-867-2729 > (Sent by wireless T-Mobile Sidekick) > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >