PipeChat Digest #4731 - Wednesday, September 1, 2004
 
Re: Drums
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Piano Selection
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
Re: Piano selection
  by "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net>
RE: Thanks for help
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
RE: Thanks for help
  by "John Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
8 LIttle Preludes and Fugues
  by "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net>
Re: 8 LIttle Preludes and Fugues
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re: Piano Selection
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re: Piano Selection
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Piano Selection
  by <FLTim@aol.com>
Re: Request for identification
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
At last on-topic - Coral Ridge!
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Drums From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2004 20:34:43 -0500   Nelson Denton amused us with the following story: > What about the lady who complained to us that the organ was out of tune with > her drums. > "The louder I drum the closer I feel to God" Gratefully, SOME of us march to the tune of a different drum. . . and STILL feel close to God. Faithfully, Rich    
(back) Subject: Piano Selection From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 04:41:00 -0500   -------Original Message------- > I guess my point is that if you walk into a piano showroom-and there is = an > antique Steinway, Mason and Hamlin, Chickering, or Knabe-that 99.999% of the > time, it will make each and every new piano in there sound and feel like a cheap > toy. Not to disagree with this, generally, I was instrumental in helping one of my church organ customers obtain an "experienced" Grand Piano for their Sanctuary. It was one that was used by a local college as a teaching instrument in one of their studio Pianos for a year on a special "floor plan .. Then it was sold at a greatly reduced price from the brand-new price. This works out to be a very good deal for both the college that "rents" the pianos in this way, as well as the purchaser, as the Piano carries a warranty and has been "broken in" by a year of some pretty heavy use by students in a controlled environment. This particular deal was "brokered" by Yamaha and one of its larger dealerships here in central Illinois. I've been maintaining the piano since it was moved to the church and I would describe it as ANYthing but "a cheap toy". It's been really quite enjoyable to work on and seems to be a solidly-built instrument. I would concur that a Knabe, it isn't, but this instrument, the smallest one to have Aliquots, is really quite good. Another possibility for people to consider are the old "brick outhouse" uprights from the turn-of-the last century through the end of the 1920's. My wife's family "happened" into a 1927 Grinnell Brothers (Detroit music house, since gone, that actually made their own Pianos!) that was a watershed experience for me. It was actually the first Piano of ANY kind that I actually LIKED! So much so that it came to live with us after my wife's parents moved to Arizona in the early 1980's. It has a tone that is to DIE for and there isn't a person that has ever sat down at this piano that hasn't come away completely blown away by both the touch of the action and the incredible tone that emanates from it. I'd put the solidity and grandeur of tone of the basses on this thing up against the biggest and best Grands. And most likely WIN! Anyone who has ever had one of these better-built of these monsters knows exactly what I'm talking about. FWIW. Faithfully, Rich  
(back) Subject: Re: Piano selection From: "James Grebe" <pianoman@accessus.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 06:12:01 -0500   Not all people believe it is a fault to have a different tone quality between the bass and treble sections. In many ways it is a plus to give = a difference in tonality between the melody and the bass. Piano technology has changed much more to trying to make the distinction as small as possible. James Grebe Piano-Forte Tuning & Repair Artisan of Wood WWW.JamesGrebe.com 1526 Raspberry Lane Arnold, MO 63010 BECOME WHAT YOU BELIEVE! pianoman@accessus.net ----- Original Message ----- From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 9:59 PM Subject: Re: Piano selection     > Dear Dennis and list, > Maestro Ceurvorst gave some suggestions regarding a piano for teaching on. I thought I would chime in with my experience selecting a grand piano a number of years ago. My uncle tuned and sold pianos and = left me his tools. While I've never tuned enough to join the technicians = guild, I have tried and tuned a number of pianos. When I was searching for a = grand in the 1970's, I had occasion to attend Oren Brown's Voice Workshop at Amherst College Music Department one summer. I tried all the Steinway M's that I could in the practice rooms there and, while they were nice pianos, = I found that they all had a bit of a "break" in the bass where the strings went from one bridge to the other. I also searched in my hometown (Atlanta then) for a piano. My conclusion was that I had to go to a 6 foot grand = to find what I wanted in terms of tone. All the 5'10" pianos didn't quite = make it in that bridge area or for some other reason. I ended up with a 1912 Starr Parlor Grand, a si! > x footer which had been rebuilt in 1976. This piano had a great deal = of brilliance, but also had a very even scale in the bridge area and a very nice bass. I also remember seeing a beautiful yellow oak Everette with = huge claw feet and a rope braid around the curve that was almost as big as your wrist. It was a beautiful, if somewhat loud piece of furniture, but the rebuilding job was poor, and tonally it just did not measure up. I was so sad, I was an oak freak then as I am now, but the piano sounded bad, even though the old Everettes had a very good reputation. I assume it was a = bad rebuild job, and, knowing who did it, that was not hard to believe, he was = a nasty man. > I think a technician can tell you what the insides of the instrument look like, and, most importantly, what shape the pinblock is in and = whether the piano is going to hold a tuning. Your ear will tell you whether the piano is what you want tonally. Many old pianos have lost the "crown" (downbearing) on the soundboard and therefore the life in their tone. = They may need a rebuild to regain it. If they aren't rebuilt right, your ear will tell you that. When I was more familiar with this field, in the 70's and 80's, the japanese pianos had a very good reputation. My uncle told = me that they often came into the showroom shipped from Japan in better tune than the domestic models. So a Young Chang or Yamaha might serve you = well. However, my main point is that you might find a good bargain in an older piano, providing the rebuild was done well. Many of the older brands were good pianos in their day: Knabe, Sommer, Chickering, Aeolian, Chilton, = etc. How they are now will ! > depend a lot on how they were rebuilt. My Starr was, I'm told, a = second tier piano (one notch below)to the Steinway and a copy of the Steinway = "A." It was massively built, much heavier than the newer six footers and it rebuilt quite well. > One other thing I learned. The Starr had a very tight new pinblock when I bought it. Although we kept it fairly well, by the 90's the pins were quite a bit looser and it could now stand to be rebuilt, probably = (when we get it out of long term storage, something I would never recommend that you do, but that's another story . . . ). I now play on a 1938 Knabe upright which needs a new set of strings. Not only are the bass strings dead, but the treble strings just don't sustain any more . . . I guess the metal has just deteriorated in crystal structure . . . however, the pins = on the Knabe are very tight, and I've been told that this relates to the fact that the upright pinblock is pretty much sealed in the piano case, whereas the grand's pinblock is open to drying air from below . . . so use = whatever means are prudent to keep your grand correctly humidified to save the pinblock. Remember my grand pinblock lasted 25 years, but the Knabe's is now 66 years old and still ! > tight! > I know we're a bit off topic here, but I guess all organists need a piano to practice on. I wouldn't see anything wrong with a nice studio (upright) piano if that's what fits in the studio and the budget, but I would have to agree that you can create a lot more lust in your students with a really nice grand, if you can manage to have one. > > Best Regards, > Roy Kersey > Organ (and Piano) Enthusiast, > Trumpet/Cornet Collector and Hacker > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >      
(back) Subject: RE: Thanks for help From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 13:13:34 +0100   The spec of New College Oxford is on the NPOR - here's a copy of it!     New College Chapel, New College Lane [D00380]=20 Grid ref: SP5106 =20 Survey date: 1975 College Chapel     Date Builder=09 1947 Hill, Norman & Beard=09 see N11010=09 1969 Grant, Degens & Bradbeer Ltd=09 new organ=09 Casework Position: W end=20 Type: Architectural=20 Casework designer: Geo. Pace Photograph of case 1969 (82183 Bytes)     Console: Pedalboard: concave radiating   Swell to Great Swell to Pedal Great to Pedal Positiv to Great Positiv to Pedal   Key action Stop action Compass low Compass highNotes Enclosed=09 Pedal Tr El C f1 30 N=09 Positiv Tr El C g3 56 N=09 Great Tr El C g3 56 N=09 Swell Tr El C g3 56 Y=09   Department Stop name Pitch =09 Pedal=09 1 Prinzipal 16 tin=09 2 Sub Bass 16 wood=09 3 Oktave 8 from Prinzipal=09 4 Rohrflote 8 from Sub Bass=09 5 Oktave 4 =09 6 Nachthorn 2 =09 7 Mixture IV 2 2/3=09 8 Fagot 32 bass oct. half length=09 9 Fagot 16 from 32'=09 10 Kupfer Trompete 8 copper=09 11 Rohrschalmei 4 part brass=09 12 Tremulant adjustable=09   Department Stop name Pitch =09 Positiv=09 13 Holzgedeckt 8 wood=09 14 Quintadena 8 =09 15 Praestant 4 tin=09 16 Rohr Flote 4 =09 17 Prinzipal 2 =09 18 Quintaton 2 =09 19 Oktave 1 =09 20 None 8/9 =09 21 Scharfzimbel 1/2 III =09 22 Holzregal 16 wood=09 23 Schalmei Krumhorn 8 copper=09   Department Stop name Pitch =09 Great=09 24 Quintade 16 lowest 7, 5 1/3'=09 25 Prinzipal 8 tin=09 26 Spitzflote 8 =09 27 Oktave 4 =09 28 Spitzgedeckt 4 =09 29 Terz 3 1/3 =09 30 Quint 2 2/3 =09 31 Oktave 2 =09 32 Mixture 1 1/3 IV-VI =09 33 Messing Regal 16 brass=09 34 Trompete 8 =09 35 Cornet V fid.G-D=09 36 Tremulant adjustable=09   Department Stop name Pitch =09 Swell=09 37 Flute a cheminee 8 =09 38 Salicional 8 grooved, Willis pipes(old org)=09 39 Celeste 8 TC, Willis pipes (old organ)=09 40 Principal 4 =09 41 Flute Conique 4 =09 42 Nazard 2 2/3 =09 43 Quarte 2 =09 44 Tierce 1 3/5 =09 45 Larigot 1 1/3 =09 46 Teint 1 1/7, 16/19 II =09 47 Fourniture 1 V =09 48 Trompete 16 lowest 17 half length=09 49 Hautbois 8 =09 50 Trompete Real 8 copper, Horizontal, unencl.=09 51 Tremulant adjustable=09 52 Cymbelstern f,g,bfl,g,d,f, with speed cntl=09   Bellows: Ped. 80mm, Sw. 75mm, Gt. 60mm, Pos. 50mm; slider windchests, inbuilt regulation     Blowing: Electric     3 general pistons, duplicated by toe pistons, adjustable at switchboard; 4 pistons Great, 4 Sw, 4 Pos, 4 toe pistons Ped. adj. by setter button 1 piston general cancel. 1 toe piston to Full Organ (blind) reversible toe pistons sw-gt and gt-pd     Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of hunts@senet.com.au Sent: 30 August 2004 18:10 To: PipeChat Subject: Thanks for help   Hi,   Thankyou to everyone who helped me with suggestions re New York - I now = have a surely comprehensive list which will keep me occupied no doubt!   I have another (not NYC specific) question. Does anyone know of any = good examples of "modern organs"? I need to explain what I mean by "modern" instruments here - I mean instruments designed with an unusual = experimental tonal pallete (most likely built in the 60's) that experiment with = unusual mutations and mixtures. I know that stops like a sixteenth whatever are probably more common on large American instruments, but on smaller = two/three manual instruments, it is rarer to find the more unusual sounds. =20   As an example, take the New College Chapel Oxford organ of 1969 by = Grant, Degens and Bradbeer. I was fortunate enough to play this last year, and = it is a very unusual instrument (can't find a stop list or remember the = details though sorry). It was described to me as "the last modern british organ" = - meaning the last organ with "unconventional" tonal design before the "baroque revival" really kicked in, whereupon every new instrument built = was suddenly a replica or variant on a 16th/17th century design!   I'm interested to learn of any unusual designs that perhaps never got = made due to the change in climate, revolutionary ideas that never got off the ground - or maybe they did, and if so, where are these examples of "progressive" (probably bad choice of word) organ building?   I remember reading somewhere (and can't find where anymore) that = Messiaen was also interested in stretching the tonal pallette of the organ, = including his organ to which he apparently wanted to add a number of unusual stops but, after his death, the proposals were apparently rejected. Does = anyone know anymore about this?   Cheers,   Anthony   This message was sent through MyMail http://www.mymail.com.au       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: RE: Thanks for help From: "John Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 05:49:48 -0700 (PDT)   I believe some changes have been made to this instrument since it was = built. The voicing has been "toned down" a bit, and some tonal changes = have been made. I believe the Teint, for example, was not a success and = has been reconfigured. I have always thought the Brave New World casework = was rather ugly, although I do like the way the plate glass swellshades = reflect the stained glass windows aand produce almost psychedelic effects = when they move. John Speller   Will Light <will.light@btinternet.com> wrote: The spec of New College Oxford is on the NPOR - here's a copy of it!     New College Chapel, New College Lane [D00380] Grid ref: SP5106 Survey date: 1975 College Chapel     Date Builder 1947 Hill, Norman & Beard see N11010 1969 Grant, Degens & Bradbeer Ltd new organ Casework Position: W end Type: Architectural Casework designer: Geo. Pace Photograph of case 1969 (82183 Bytes)     Console: Pedalboard: concave radiating   Swell to Great Swell to Pedal Great to Pedal Positiv to Great Positiv to Pedal   Key action Stop action Compass low Compass highNotes Enclosed Pedal Tr El C f1 30 N Positiv Tr El C g3 56 N Great Tr El C g3 56 N Swell Tr El C g3 56 Y   Department Stop name Pitch Pedal 1 Prinzipal 16 tin 2 Sub Bass 16 wood 3 Oktave 8 from Prinzipal 4 Rohrflote 8 from Sub Bass 5 Oktave 4 6 Nachthorn 2 7 Mixture IV 2 2/3 8 Fagot 32 bass oct. half length 9 Fagot 16 from 32' 10 Kupfer Trompete 8 copper 11 Rohrschalmei 4 part brass 12 Tremulant adjustable   Department Stop name Pitch Positiv 13 Holzgedeckt 8 wood 14 Quintadena 8 15 Praestant 4 tin 16 Rohr Flote 4 17 Prinzipal 2 18 Quintaton 2 19 Oktave 1 20 None 8/9 21 Scharfzimbel 1/2 III 22 Holzregal 16 wood 23 Schalmei Krumhorn 8 copper   Department Stop name Pitch Great 24 Quintade 16 lowest 7, 5 1/3' 25 Prinzipal 8 tin 26 Spitzflote 8 27 Oktave 4 28 Spitzgedeckt 4 29 Terz 3 1/3 30 Quint 2 2/3 31 Oktave 2 32 Mixture 1 1/3 IV-VI 33 Messing Regal 16 brass 34 Trompete 8 35 Cornet V fid.G-D 36 Tremulant adjustable   Department Stop name Pitch Swell 37 Flute a cheminee 8 38 Salicional 8 grooved, Willis pipes(old org) 39 Celeste 8 TC, Willis pipes (old organ) 40 Principal 4 41 Flute Conique 4 42 Nazard 2 2/3 43 Quarte 2 44 Tierce 1 3/5 45 Larigot 1 1/3 46 Teint 1 1/7, 16/19 II 47 Fourniture 1 V 48 Trompete 16 lowest 17 half length 49 Hautbois 8 50 Trompete Real 8 copper, Horizontal, unencl. 51 Tremulant adjustable 52 Cymbelstern f,g,bfl,g,d,f, with speed cntl   Bellows: Ped. 80mm, Sw. 75mm, Gt. 60mm, Pos. 50mm; slider windchests, inbuilt regulation     Blowing: Electric     3 general pistons, duplicated by toe pistons, adjustable at switchboard; 4 pistons Great, 4 Sw, 4 Pos, 4 toe pistons Ped. adj. by setter button 1 piston general cancel. 1 toe piston to Full Organ (blind) reversible toe pistons sw-gt and gt-pd      
(back) Subject: 8 LIttle Preludes and Fugues From: "Stephen Williams" <stepwill@enter.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 09:33:17 -0400   This is one of those items that seems to excite the debate in us rather = than the discussion, but I've certainly enjoyed reading the varied opinions nonetheless. The names and opinions of some rather esteemed and respected scholars and historians have been raised as well . . also extremely = useful and educational.   Since there is no hard evidence, as has been insisted upon, to = authenticate any of our opinions, debate seems futile. But the discussion is not only great in itself, but is very helpful if we are to try and piece together = the fascinating possibilities of style and musical expression of the Baroque, and particularly the astounding Bach output.   Given the bottom line that we simply don't KNOW who wrote these pieces, = and perhaps never will, I truly believe that we are left to our instincts and our gut feeling that comes from constant study, performance, and listening to the works of Bach and those around him (after all, that's what HE = did!). With three performances to go over the next three days in the second = series of performances of the "complete" works, I, too, have an opinion, and it's one that comes from how these pieces feel and sound after experiencing the "rest" of his work. They are truly unlike anything else that Bach wrote = for the organ that we know of, and I would tend to agree that he didn't write them, although I would never discount the idea that he may have coached others in writing them, possibly as an exercise. They are just too = perfectly balanced and charming in every way to say J. S. wasn't involved somehow. Interesting, isn't it?   What should the bulletin or recital program say? Why not just attr. J. S. Bach? Seems to cover what we know at the moment. Of course, all this is = just an opinion, since we all know about as much as my two wonderful feline = pals about the subject . . and I'm not kidding . . they've heard the joys and frustrations of learning the complete organ works of Bach over, and over, and over . . .   Cheers to all,   Stephen Williams      
(back) Subject: Re: 8 LIttle Preludes and Fugues From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 10:13:45 -0400   In my PERSONAL and unsholarly opinion, Bach wrote the 8 little pereludes and fugues as exercising works for one of his sons, alike the Inventions. They have enough "Bachian":) elements to be attributed to the Master, although many of his works are strongly inspired by Buxtehude and Vivaldi... and remember that in those uncomplicated times a composer was free to use themes, elements, even entire excerpts from the work of other Masters without dealing with a lawsuit :)   I think that in a concert program I would state "By J.S. Bach, according = to recent studies attributed to XY". I guess that this would arouse some curiosity and interest in the audience...   Just musing :) Andres ----------- Mensaje Original -------------- De: Stephen Williams [stepwill@enter.net] Para: PipeChat List [Pipechat@pipechat.org] Cc: Asunto: 8 LIttle Preludes and Fugues Fecha: 01/09/2004 09:39:45 Mensaje:   This is one of those items that seems to excite the debate in us rather than the discussion, but I've certainly enjoyed reading the varied opinions nonetheless. SNIP ETC        
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Selection From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 10:47:22 -0400   Japanese made astounding progresses in piano building. I noticed this recently, coming from a country that houses older pianos from two japanese brands to a country where recent models from the same two firms are sold. Most churches I visited here house far-eastern brand pinaos.   As for vintage pianos, too many facts influence their inherited quality, starting with how the piano was built (as in cars there are some lemons!), =   how the piano was treated by its previous owner(s), who made the maintenance, who made an overhaul or restoration (if), and how this overhaul was made (vintage quality parts or standard stuff makes a great difference).   If someone considers to purchase a vintage piano, the instrument must be subjected to a very close examination by an expert *technician* (not pianist). A sagged bridge, hidden crack in the soundboard or loose tuning pins are nasty and expensive to fix surprises that are not noticed at = first impression or insight. A piano with such defects even might have a = terrific sound!   As for a teaching / learning pianos: Depends on the case. For an average starting kid I adfvised a not-too-expensive one which is in fairly good condition for the first years. If the kid grows up and decides to become a musician it's still time to buy a more quality instrument. The action should't feel too hard or too "slappy"... just enough to = develop the muscles of hands and fingers. Professionals usually want a heavier = than average action for practice. Makes sense.   Practice pianos (as well as practice organs) are subjected to heavy use = and must be sturdy, reliable, and *Please!!* well kept. "Always keep your piano well tuned and in good condition for proper development of hearing and fingers" (Robert Schumann, ten Huose-and-life rules for the Musician).   Yours Andres ----------- Mensaje Original -------------- De: Richard Schneider [arpschneider@starband.net] Para: PIPECHAT-L EMAIL Address Address [pipechat@pipechat.org] Cc: Asunto: Piano Selection Fecha: 01/09/2004 05:40:52 Mensaje:   -------Original Message------- > I guess my point is that if you walk into a piano showroom-and there is = an > antique Steinway, Mason and Hamlin, Chickering, or Knabe-that 99.999% of the > time, it will make each and every new piano in there sound and feel like a cheap > toy. Not to disagree with this, generally, I was instrumental in helping one of my church organ customers obtain an "experienced" Grand Piano for their Sanctuary. SNIP ETC        
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Selection From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 11:01:39 EDT   Japan builds the best Pianos.   Used pianos are used pianos whether it was used up by a university or a = home.   Buy NEW.   rebuilts are no longer anything but a new piano with an old frame/harp.   dale in florida  
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Selection From: <FLTim@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 11:28:02 EDT   Dale in Florida wrote: Japan builds the best Pianos. You must be joking... Europe builds the best pianos. I think I would = take a Bosendorfer, Bluthner, August Forster, Bechstein, Steingraeber & Shone, Fazioli, Grotrian, Haessler... The list goes on over a Yamaha. Best regards, Tim Newby, Vice President     Central Music, Inc.   Relevant instruments for every worship style. Representing Rodgers digital organs, Fratelli Ruffatti pipe organs and Bluthner concert pianos www.centralmusic.biz ~ (800) 537-7473 ~ (727) 573-4654 Serving Florida since 1958  
(back) Subject: Re: Request for identification From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 17:48:38 +0200     From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 3:23 AM > It starts identically with Richard Ellsasser's Variations on a Theme by > Paganini, but it deviates before the 2 minutes of the anfang end. I = didn't > listen to the fuge. (It all involves listening in one room and running = to > another to listen to the Ellsasser LP -- too much work for tonight.)   Thanks for this information. But could you please tell me more about this = record? Title, label and number, and especially is it a live improvisation or a written piece by Ellsasser himself? And please let = me know the organ he plays on this record. Thanks in advance.   Yours sincerely   Arno    
(back) Subject: At last on-topic - Coral Ridge! From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 12:32:53 -0400   Designed by Diane Bish (whose legendary name even spreaded to Venezuela); built by Fratelli Rufatti (Italy) in 1974, dedicated Jan 5 1975, recently updated: That's the organ of Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church in Ft Lauderdale, FL.   "...One of the largest European-built organs in the U.S.", the Prospectus states proudly. The organ is a V manual -117 ranks. The church has one of the finest accoustics I know, comparable to theUCV-Aula Magna and the = Rios Reyna Concert Hall in Caracas. No matter where you seat, you hear all perfectly, the reverberation is 1 sec average.   The Church has a very active music life, a really good chancel choir and = an annual concert series program. By the way, Diane Bish will perform on the organ next Nov 5th for its 30th anniversary, and I look forward to attend the event if I still live in the area at that time. The current organist = of the church is Mr. Samuel Metzger.   The organ has a nice neo-barroque sound (much nicer in real than on the 1993 record sold at the church shop). The facade blends into the church's architecture and is clearly inspired by the german organ facades of the late 60's to early 70's. It features a "rare Zimbelstern" (according to other prospectus) and the console's side panels were hand-carved to match the church's interior design by a young artist. The recently installed digital stops are so perfect that I for first time was not able to distinguish them from real ones. (The installation was recently made, and Samuel gave a organ demonstration after the postlude on Sunday Aug 22) - Getting deaf, Andres? :) Not at all, my friends. Technology getting forward! [No puns or personal viewpoints, only facts this time]   I visited church and organ twice, at sunday service. The first time, Aug 22, Samuel pergformed "Carrillon de Longpont"by Louis Vierne, the sunday after (Aug 29) Percival Fletcher's Festival Toccata as postlude. The mayority of the congregation stood up and left with the due noise... I = find that so sad for this young, talented organist. A few people however (me included of course) stood by until the end of the postlude and cheered.   This organ is the exact opposite from the Schantz/unknown builder organ in First Presbyterian Church of Pompano I described some weeks ago. Just as = an idea: It would be nice to perform two recitals -one centered in barroque works on Coral Ridge, the second centered in late 19th/early 20th cty literature at the "Pink Church". Since both churches are near together = this would be possible to make.   Coral Ridge First Presbyterian Church is undergoing some exterior renovation right now, mostly the spire. Nothing for people with vertigo problems :) Its real unique desgin, architecture and landscaping won an award. For who comes to the Ft Lauderdale Area a visit to the church = should be a must in the program. Guided tours are available by appointment upon request. Website www.crpc.org   Briefly yours (because I still don't have an own PC) Andres First was the cat, then was the Orgler. The Orgler got a pet, and the cat got something to wonder about.