PipeChat Digest #4732 - Wednesday, September 1, 2004
 
Re: Request for identification
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: What's with the bagpipes
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Re: Coral Ridge
  by "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com>
Re: Piano Selection
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
RE: Piano Selection
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
hymnals with accompaniment trax
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: a question I can't answer, forsooth!
  by "Garrison Johnson" <johnco18@comcast.net>
Re: hymnals with accompaniment trax
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: What's with the bagpipes
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: hymnals with accompaniment trax
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Piano Selection
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Piano Selection
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Piano Selection
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Piano Selection - Fazioli
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Request for identification From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 09:46:37 -0700     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> >> It starts identically with Richard Ellsasser's Variations on a Theme by >> Paganini, but it deviates before the 2 minutes of the anfang end. I >> didn't >> listen to the fuge. (It all involves listening in one room and running = to >> another to listen to the Ellsasser LP -- too much work for tonight.) > > Thanks for this information. But could you please tell me more about = this > record? Title, label and number, and especially is it a > live improvisation or a written piece by Ellsasser himself? And please = let > me know the organ he plays on this record.   The record is Richard Ellsasser: The Composer (MGM E3417), which comprises =   his Variations on a Theme by Paganini (on the theme of the Caprice in a minor, as used by Rachmaninoff et al ad inf) and Variations on a Theme by Chopin (on the Funeral March from the piano Sonata in Bb minor). Like most =   of Ellsasser's MGM records, it was recorded on the organ of the John Hays Hammond, Jr. Museum (or Castle) in Gloucester, Massachusetts, a rather odd =   four-manual mostly-Austin mongrel of about 135 ranks.   The notes state: "The present recording offers the two largest organ compositions by Mr. Ellsasser to appear on records to date. Both of these works set in the classical theme and variations form are big in concept, brilliantly idiomatic in feeling, and filled with striking musical ideas. Both are intensely dramatic and both make great technical demands upon the =   performer."   The implication is clearly that they were written compositions rather than =   improvisations, but no publishing information is given.   MAF    
(back) Subject: Re: What's with the bagpipes From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 13:15:04 EDT   My daughter belonged to an RC church, but the pastoral care from hospice during Jeffrey's last few months was a Rabbi. His father is also Jewish. = I don't know who chose the hymn for the bagpiper, as it may have been the only = thing he knew (just speculating). It was very effective and even comforting to = hear the bagpipe as we were leaving the cemetery. Jeffrey was only 21, but had = a severe developmental disability. His favorite things were balloons and classical music. His brief life reached many others -- my daughter = started support groups for caretakers of mothers of disabled children, educated doctors = and educators about Tuberous Sclerosis, I went back to school to get a = teaching certificate in Special Education and subsequently worked with many = disabled adults and children over 15 years. Lee  
(back) Subject: Re: Coral Ridge From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 12:31:44 -0500   I always find it mystifying that usually when Coral Ridge is mentioned somewhere we hear the name of Diane Bish -- who was very instrumental in the history of the church and clearly responsible for the Ruffatti in it's original state and several reincarnations -- and the current organist, Samuel Metzger, but we hardly ever see any mention of the person in charge of what must surely be one of the larger music programs in the USA, John Lias Wilson, Director of Music. John is a graduate of Westminster College (the one in Western PA) and the now-defunct program at Union Theological Seminary in NYC. He is a wonderfully accomplished organist in his own right as his is talented wife Lisa (Blyler) Wilson who assists in the church's program. John served churches in NY, and then in Haddonfield, New Jersey, Ocean City New Jersey, and Wayne PA, and finally the huge Haddonfield United Methodist Church where he presided over a tonal reconstruction of the Austin by the late Michael O'Dea -- surely one of the finest organs in South Jersey. Never unnecessarily flashy, John is a humble musician who takes a very workmanlike approach to everything he does and achieves excellent results with amateur musicians. I make it a point to tune in to the Coral Ridge Hour as I rise each Sunday -- not to hear the preaching -- I am at the extreme opposite approach in theology and in great distress over the theological stance of this ministry and preacher, and switch off the TV as soon as the anthem is over and the preacher appears -- but for the opening 10 minutes where we get to hear the opening hymn and then the anthem. Unlike what occurs in most mega-churches, John frequently programs music from the great choral repertoire instead of pandering to the lowest possible common denominator of taste. He should be publicly commended and emulated instead of ignored or forgotten behind the names of the more visible staff.   Larry Wheelock Director of Music Ministries Kenwood United Methodist Church Milwaukee, Wisconsin musicdirector@kenwood-umc.org   On Sep 1, 2004, at 11:47 AM, PipeChat wrote:   > The Church has a very active music life, a really good chancel choir > and an > annual concert series program.
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Selection From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 13:43:03 EDT   I worked at Grinnell's in Detroit in 1955 in the piano department. During =   lunch one day when most of the salesmen were either out or busy, Sammy = Davis Jr. came in to look at the pianos. I showed him several and he picked out his =   favorite. About that time the salesman appeared, but gave me credit for = the sale. I agree, they were fine pianos. Lee  
(back) Subject: RE: Piano Selection From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 12:55:29 -0500   Japan builds the best Pianos.   =20   I can't agree with that, but it's a matter of opinion, like choosing an organ builder. We all know which companies are at the top of the line, and which ones don't build the most reliable instruments, but when it comes to narrowing it down, we're all going to say something different.   Used pianos are used pianos whether it was used up by a university or a home..   =20   Yes, they ARE used-but not necessarily used UP. Many a fine old piano I've played that was not rebuilt and still performed well. =20     Buy NEW.       Only if your tastes and your budget allow-I wouldn't have one.     rebuilts are no longer anything but a new piano with an old frame/harp.     dale in florida   =20   Rebuilt pianos are much more than this-it isn't that simple. If you carefully rebuild a piano, you can send off the old strings to have new ones manufactured EXACTLY like the old ones-which makes a difference. If the hammers are nicely voiced, and aged well, they are capable of producing a tone that a new piano never can. And if you RESTORE the action rather than REPLACE it, you are keeping what might be a dream to play. =20   =20   All of this, of course, considering that you have a fine old piano to begin with.   =20   During the nineteenth century, Chickering was the Steinway-or the top of the line. Steinways became the top of the line after Chickering was bought in about 1905. And of course, those turn-of-the century Mason & Hamlins are very fine, too.   =20   If carefully restored (not just gutted and replaced), old pianos can be just as reliable as new ones (and in the case of some of the newer Japanese maker, perhaps more so!).   =20   Daniel   Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: hymnals with accompaniment trax From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 12:04:45 -0700   Dear Friends and Colleagues,   I have received some very "interesting" replies to my query. Perhaps I should have said a bit more about the situation:   The church building is a large Akron-plan church from the 1920s (?). It houses a Schantz pipe organ of maybe 8-10 ranks that was given a new or used horseshoe console in the 1940s. From the description, it is NOT a theatre organ console. I'm guessing Hillgreen-Lane did the work, since they were nearby. The church was closed for about ten years; there is evidence that before that the organ was maintained ... some reservoirs have been releathered, etc. The organ is playable, but it needs some further work.   Eventually the building will house a coffee house and a number of other businesses, in addition to a congregation. The church auditorium will undoubtedly be multi-use, as one of the projected businesses is a theatre/arts center.   The congregation at this point numbers 10-20 on Sunday morning. When they initially contacted me, I advised them to do all the usual things: contact the AGO, advertise on the bulletin boards in the music departments of area colleges, etc.   They can only afford to pay $50-$75 per week. That simply isn't competitive in the Cleveland-Akron-Canton area, even for a retired person or a student. They got NO responses.   Several people suggested they sing a cappella. That simply isn't on their radar ... and in any case they have no one who can lead the singing.   I probably should have also made clear that this is an INTERIM solution. They have had Schantz out to look at the organ; some repairs were done (most of the stop tabs had been broken off at some point). They ARE committed to traditional music in an evangelical vein and the use of the pipe organ, once they grow to the size that they can afford to finish fixing the organ and hire someone at a competitive salary to play it.   I am NOT an advocate of canned accompaniments or automatic instruments .... no WAY, no HOW ... but it seems to be the best INTERIM solution in their particular situation.   Cheers,   Bud      
(back) Subject: RE: a question I can't answer, forsooth! From: "Garrison Johnson" <johnco18@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 15:01:18 -0400   Check this web-site: http://www.musicity.com/one_box.html   Jennie Mae & Garry J. The Johnsons 1913 Rockcreek Lane Flint MI 48507-2274 voice (810)233-7094 fax (810)233-7599   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Liquescent Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 2:57 PM To: anglican-music@list.stsams.org; PipeChat Subject: a question I can't answer, forsooth!     Alan Freed, would you please post this to Choralist for me?   A friend of mine is the building manager for a small start-up community church in Canton, OH. They don't have an organist, and they can't afford one.   They're looking for a more traditional hymnal in the evangelical/Baptist tradition (not CCM) for which they can obtain a CD of accompaniment tracks, either organ or orchestral (and preferably vocal or choral tracks as well, but I know that will be more difficult).   Just guessing from what he's told me (he's not a musician) I think something along the lines of "Hymns for the Family of God" or similar would fit their needs.   1. Does such a thing exist?   2. What was the name of that electronic "barrel-organ" that had a large library of hymnals on disk? Lisa? Lysa? Something like that ... it was advertised awhile back, and some small Episcopal churches bought them.   As you might imagine, this is WAY out of my area of expertise (chuckle).   Thanks for any help!   Cheers,   Bud       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: hymnals with accompaniment trax From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 15:42:59 -0400   On 9/1/04 3:04 PM, "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote:   > Several people suggested they sing a cappella. That simply isn't on their > radar ... and in any case they have no one who can lead the singing. >=20 I don't know, Bud. We wanted 80 ranks of Taylor & Boody, but couldn't afford it. Someone suggested (15 years ago) spending $150,000 on a 23-rank tracker from Germany. Well, it just wasn't on our radar, but we bought it anyway. We're still more than pleased with it. We junked the radar scope.   I don't think they'd be able to sing to a CD without someone to "lead" the singing. That song-leader=B9d have to get acquainted with the CD in advance, and =B3lead=B2 them into each song. It sounds like they=B9re starting up with a severe lack of some things they really NEED. Maybe the pastor could be a volunteer, and they could pay an organist.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: What's with the bagpipes From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 12:28:06 -0500   We're fortunate in Winnipeg to have a local "church piper", a friend of mine who not only plays in churches on a regular basis but who has arranged some 1500 hymns for bagpipes and published 10 volumes of bagpipe hymn arrangements which are sold via the internet and through Scottish/Celtic shops in several countries. Keith MacDonald's piping is an addition to any service - very inspirational.   TTFN, Russ Greene St. Andrew's Anglican Church (Woodhaven) Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada    
(back) Subject: Re: hymnals with accompaniment trax From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 13:45:23 -0700   Actually the pastor is bankrolling the whole shootin' match ... he bought the building, paid for the renovations, etc. But he is (wisely, I think) insisting that both the church and the other businesses be self-sustaining, and not simply a tax write-off for him.   My friend says the pastor has attention span issues (chuckle) ... they went from getting a bid on having the organ completely renovated to looking at CCM to looking for a traditional evangelical hymnal with accompaniment trax.   I THINK what will happen ULTIMATELY is that he will shell out for an organist. As everybody knows who's done it (and I do have SOME experience with it, from when I was organist at MCC San Diego), running a music program using trax requires good sound equipment and a better sound engineer, for starters.   The foray into CCM flopped because they discovered they had to pay union scale for a band (chuckle) ... lead guitar, bass guitar, keyboard and drums was MORE expensive than an ORGANIST.   Karma is a wonderfully equalizing force in the Universe (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Alan Freed wrote:   > On 9/1/04 3:04 PM, "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> wrote: > > > Several people suggested they sing a cappella. That simply isn't on > their > > radar ... and in any case they have no one who can lead the singing. > > > I don't know, Bud. We wanted 80 ranks of Taylor & Boody, but couldn't > afford it. Someone suggested (15 years ago) spending $150,000 on a > 23-rank tracker from Germany. Well, it just wasn't on our radar, but we =   > bought it anyway. We're still more than pleased with it. We junked the =   > radar scope. > > I don't think they'd be able to sing to a CD without someone to "lead" > the singing. That song-leader=92d have to get acquainted with the CD in =   > advance, and =93lead=94 them into each song. It sounds like they=92re > starting up with a severe lack of some things they really NEED. Maybe > the pastor could be a volunteer, and they could pay an organist. > > Alan      
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Selection From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 16:54:14 EDT   In a message dated 9/1/2004 11:28:48 AM Eastern Standard Time, = FLTim@aol.com writes:   > Fazioli,   if this is a 10 foot i would have it in a minute..... as to the rest,   they have charm and expense and narrow dark sound and play like trucks a = la steinway.......   i like clarity, brightness especially for aging ears, ease of play and the =   ability to play jazz to chopin....... btw what does your store sell = besides Rodgers and Ruffati Pipes?   it is fun to play with things like this though. Different tastes and all that.   I will take a C 7 any day anytime.   grinning as i play my General Music ProMega3 with the Faziloi sample that will tear your heart out at communion.   dale in Florida  
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Selection From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 18:55:16 -0400   For what it's worth, I picked up a magnificent 9 foot Kawai (ca. 1950) last spring. After my technician looked it over, and he told me it was unlikely I'd ever find another instrument that good for what was an incredibly low price. As part of what was initially a casual search, two of us played a lot of pianos, including new Steinways, Bosendorfers, Yamahas, Bostons, and on and on. None came close to equaling this Kawai, which is truly a great piano. No, it has never been rebuilt other than new hammers and bass strings. And it came signed by five pianists, the most notable of whom was Wilhelm Backhaus. My point? I know I was just in the right place at the right time, but had I not been open to the possibility of an older Japanese instrument, I'd have missed the bargain of a lifetime! Too bad I didn't have this instrument when I was a kid -- I'd have liked the piano a whole lot more!   And just to keep it all on topic -- remember there are some darned fine "used" organs available too, just a few of which may be seen on the Organ Clearing House website.   Steve Best in Utica, NY     Daniel Hancock wrote:   > Japan builds the best Pianos. > > > > I can't agree with that, but it's a matter of opinion, like choosing > an organ builder. We all know which companies are at the top of the > line, and which ones don't build the most reliable instruments, but > when it comes to narrowing it down, we're all going to say something > different. > > Used pianos are used pianos whether it was used up by a university or > a home.. > > > > Yes, they ARE used--but not necessarily used UP. Many a fine old > piano I've played that was not rebuilt and still performed well. > > > Buy NEW. > > Only if your tastes and your budget allow--I wouldn't have one. >    
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Selection From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2004 19:11:35 -0400   On 9/1/04 6:55 PM, "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> wrote:   > I picked up a magnificent 9 foot Kawai (ca. 1950) last spring.   You, Stephen, obviously live VERY close to the Lord. I=B9m hugely glad for you. (Just think where else that instrument might have gone! IT is as happy with YOU, as YOU are with IT!)   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Piano Selection - Fazioli From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2004 18:41:42 -0500   I am very happy that the local University here has two (2) Fazioli = grands. The arrived last year ..... $415,000... was the price for two. = There are differences in the two.... one is perfect for heavier works, = i.e. Beethoven and on....the other is excellent for Bach and earlier.... = and accompanying chamber works..... they are the best piano's in the = world.... I think the production line can only make a dozen a year.   Sand Lawn ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Keys4bach@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2004 3:54 PM Subject: Re: Piano Selection     In a message dated 9/1/2004 11:28:48 AM Eastern Standard Time, = FLTim@aol.com writes:     Fazioli,     if this is a 10 foot i would have it in a minute..... as to the rest,   they have charm and expense and narrow dark sound and play like trucks = a la steinway.......