PipeChat Digest #4757 - Friday, September 10, 2004
 
Economics of geography and relocation
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Annual Dutch Dash  (part one) - Hideously long
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Programming
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: MORE ORCHESTRAS, LESS ORGAN -- not quite
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Economics of geography and relocation
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Annual Dutch Dash  - apologies
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Economics of geography and relocation
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Economics of geography and relocation
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Annual Dutch Dash  - apologies
  by "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu>
Re: Annual Dutch Dash  - apologies
  by "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com>
Re: Economics of geography and relocation
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: Programming for people
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Economics of geography and relocation
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Economics of geography and relocation
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Colin Mitchell mp3 added
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Re: Trinity Wall Street organ damage
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Economics of geography and relocation
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Organ images in PowerPoint?
  by "Bryan Gerlach" <BGerlach@sab.wels.net>
Trinity College Choir at Saint Mary's College, Moraga, CA
  by "Blaine Ricketts" <blainericketts@comcast.net>
[OFF TOPIC] Ivan
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Famous scholar organs quotes
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: Famous scholar organs quotes
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Being Happy in Your Church
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
Organs in the U.K.
  by "John Jarvis" <jljarvis@comcast.net>
Re: Programming
  by <OMusic@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Economics of geography and relocation From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 09:59:19 -0400   On 9/10/04 8:21 AM, "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> wrote:   > I'm comfortably settled into my present location, where my hubby and I = are > happy with the quality of life and where the cost of living is = substantially > more affordable than the coasts.   Well, all THAT is undoubtedly true! And everything else you said, too, = for that matter. Roughly where ARE you?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Annual Dutch Dash (part one) - Hideously long From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 09:47:51 -0700   Dear Colin, and list   As a born in Rotterdam Dutchman, still speaking the language, now living in the US since 1960; I truly enjoyed your impression of Holland. I have many relatives there and return on a regular basis. I recall St Laurens as a burnt out hulk in the 40's/50's as I sat on the back of my dad's bicycle as we trekked across town to visit my grandmother. It stood out as a monument to the totally leveled area surrounding it. Imagine my happy surprise when I brought my American bride to Rotterdam in 1977 and to find St Laurens restored and in posession of then 3 great new instruments. The "big" one, a small choir organ, and the transept organ. So just to set the record straight: the transept organ ONLY was indeed donated by Germany! However Colin, as you noted national pride, so is the language - however anglicized it has become - The word "der" is absolutely NOT Dutch! It is German....".....We paid for der orgel, and for all der restoration!...." what you heard was most likely "de" translated as "the" ( the dipthong is difficult for dutch tongues)..and some might take offense at implying they would speak German..still a sensitive thing with some generations. Likewise .... "Haarlem ish not so gutt...." no Dutch tongue places "sh" after "is"; that is specifically German, and "gutt" is another German word. The Dutch word "goed" ( with that killer "g") which the Dutch translate as "good" and most likely pronounce "goot" as it takes a while to learn the sound of English vowels and to place a "d" after it.   Please dont take offense to this Colin and I look forward to the next "impression report" ; but us Dutch can be picky and hard headed ( Just ask my wife! LOL)   And Oh yes, we took my 2 teenage daughters to Holland in the 90's They Loved the French Fries ( Patat Frites) and SiSi soda. They marveled at the mass transit system and got just as bored on the Spido trip! LOL   More musically entertaining for kids is the museum in Utrecht: 'Van Speeldoos to Pierement", a huge collection of mechanical musical instruments ranging from music boxes to complete barrel organs.   If anyone else ever visits Rotterdam , take a trip to neighboring Schiedam, where I spent my younger years 'til emigration. It has an absolutely charming preserved center of town - complete with canals and narrow streets - which goes back to at least the 1500's. Close to the town hall is the St Jan's kerk. They tell me it was built on a foundation of cow hides (???) and its steeple may well date back to 1100. It has a gorgeous organ in it, that Sony thought well enough of to put it out on 2 CDs. Again I am told the original case dates to the 1500's, and the organ was restored in the '60's. When I was a little boy, I thought the carved angel atop the case played the trumpet solos when we did "Thine is the Glory" on Easter morning.   A few blocks from there used to be the Passage theatre, with its Standaart Theater Organ. That is where the TO bug bit me. Unfortunately the Art Deco house was raized to make room for a shopping mall. Altogether not as bad as it seems; While the building loss was a shame, it did revitalize downtown AND the city decided to build a brand new state of the art performing art center ( "Theater aan de Schie" ) complete with underground parking, and .....organ chambers!! The venerable Standaart was restored and is now alive and well in a new home.   I miss that country at times, but the traffic drives me nuts!   Looking forward to more from Colin...   John V  
(back) Subject: Programming From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 10:02:02 EDT   >It reminded me of what Dr Francis Jackson always said >about programme planning, "Something light, something >heavy, something fast and something slow.......and >always a nice melody or two for the old ladies!"     I am not sure when most organists will ever get this message. Virgil = griped about this, Ted Worth complained, Carlo Curley has made it a point to address this , and numerous other concert artists who have brought the = organ TO THE PEOPLE all have figured this out. The successful artists know that the audience is generally not made up of other organists, but is made up = people from the congregation and the community. I'm all for educating them about = some of the wonderful music out there, but a program at Colin Mitchell = experienced at Bavokerk does nothing to win converts over to the organ. From the = sound of it, I would have been bored to tears. I get exasperated with these = "niche" type of recitals that are fine for an organ convention, but are so far = over the general public's head. It's no wonder that people don't like the = organ because they think the organ is boring. What happened to the days of = yore when churches and public auditoriums were packed with people who came to hear organ recitals? We organists have scared off our audiences with our = programs that are not listener friendly. There is nothing wrong with giving the audience some "meat," but they need something to give their ears a break, = as well. The program that Colin heard would have made me walk out. The things that =   makes me sad is this quote, "Shaun was clearly disappointed and confused = by what he heard, and I felt disappointed for him." When a teenage listener is disappointed by our instrument, it makes me mad. I fault the organist = playing for not thinking of the audience. There were no crowd pleaser pieces = listed. Not every pieces has to be a big toccata, but even if there was a "fun" = Bach Prelude and Fugue, such as the D Major 532 or the Fantasia and Fugue in g =   minor. Those pieces are exciting, the fugues rock, and on the Bavokerk = organ, I'm sure that they would sound awesome! I've tiraded against this before = and will continue to do it until the day I die. If we don't have an audience = for our recitals, we don't need to be playing because we've scared everyone off. I'm convinced that part of the reason that many churches have gone = to bands in their services is because of how bad the organ music is/was. We = need to wake up and realize that we are part of the reason that the organ is not = a popular instrument and only we can help revitalize it. Ok, I'm off my soapbox now. Monty Bennett        
(back) Subject: Re: MORE ORCHESTRAS, LESS ORGAN -- not quite From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 10:52:32 -0500   Sounds pretty cool to me. I certainly wouldn't count on it as a = substitute for the organ, but would use it to the fullest potential. I don't see how =   having a volunteer orchestra is any different than having a volunteer choir.   On Wed, 8 Sep 2004 19:59:42 -0600, F. Richard Burt wrote > Hello, Seb, Bud, et al: > > Having posed the question of having an orchestra for every > seek (assuming one service on Sunday and one rehearsal > at union scale), how would you respond to 36 orchestral > volunteers at no financial cost to the church. This orchestra > exists mostly as it provides the players a place to give > their talent a hearing. > > We have one rehearsal every week, and play on only one > Sunday morning each month. However, that one Sunday > probably includes two services. > > We do this as a regular part of our worship music ministry > at the First Baptist Church in Garland. > > The orchestra includes about 18 to 20 string players, > one or two flutes, one or two clarinets, oboe, bassoon, > one or two horns, three or four trombones, maybe a > tuba, three or four trumpets, kettle drums, snare drum, > glokenspiel, cymbals, maybe a modern trap set, and > any other "special" instruments we can put to good use.   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Economics of geography and relocation From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 12:51:08 EDT   In a message dated 9/10/2004 10:02:06 AM Eastern Standard Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > Roughly where ARE you? > >   she is in heaven on earth....   dale in hurricane rowwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww  
(back) Subject: Re: Annual Dutch Dash - apologies From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 10:20:56 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I must be getting old!   I thought it was Arie Vandenburg who walked across Rotterdam with his father after the bombing of Rotterdam, but now I see that it was John Vanderlee.   Apologies to both for the confusion.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> wrote:   > Dear Colin, and list > > As a born in Rotterdam Dutchman, still speaking the > language, now > living in the US since 1960; I truly enjoyed your > impression of > Holland. I have many relatives there and return on a > regular basis. > I recall St Laurens as a burnt out hulk in the > 40's/50's as I sat on > the back of my dad's bicycle as we trekked across > town to visit my > grandmother.     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 50x more storage than other providers! http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: Economics of geography and relocation From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 13:35:17 -0400   On 9/10/04 12:51 PM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > dale in hurricane rowwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww   That=B9s for dang sure. I KNOW there are reasons for living there. Maybe even good ones. I even have cousins on Sanibel Island.   But I sure can=B9t figure out that those reasons ARE=8Bfor living anywhere sout= h of the Mason-Dixon Line.   Alan (Norwegian/Swedish genes)  
(back) Subject: Re: Economics of geography and relocation From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 13:36:53 -0400   On 9/10/04 12:51 PM, "Keys4bach@aol.com" <Keys4bach@aol.com> wrote:   > she is in heaven on earth.... > Oh! Seattle!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Annual Dutch Dash - apologies From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 13:25:40 -0700   Hey Colin, It was probably either or both of us in our respective = times....;-)   Still love your travelogues!!   John V  
(back) Subject: Re: Annual Dutch Dash - apologies From: "Arie Vandenberg" <ArieV@ClassicOrgan.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 13:43:19 -0400   At 10:20 AM 2004-09-10 -0700, you wrote: >Hello, > >I must be getting old! > >I thought it was Arie Vandenburg who walked across >Rotterdam with his father after the bombing of >Rotterdam, but now I see that it was John Vanderlee. > >Apologies to both for the confusion. > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK   Colin,   I may be as Dutch as can be in terms of blood lines, but I was bred and born in Canada. And I think of myself as 100% Canadian. No offense taken at your confusion.   Now if we could only bring one of those fine Dutch organs you heard and bring it to the Toronto area, I would be so much happier.   Arie V.      
(back) Subject: Re: Economics of geography and relocation From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 15:38:08 EDT   In a message dated 9/10/04 1:35:59 PM Eastern Daylight Time,=20 acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   << But I sure can=C2=B9t figure out that those reasons ARE=E2=80=B9for livin= g anywhere=20 south of the Mason-Dixon Line. =20 Alan (Norwegian/Swedish genes) >>   But Alan, didn't you live here in Baltimore for a time???   Richard Spittel Baltimore, MD  
(back) Subject: Re: Programming for people From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 13:20:32 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Amen to Monty's feelings about programming of organ recitals/concerts.   I was thinking the other day, that I would derive enormous enjoyment from a concert containing the following:-   Pastorale - Fricker "Ascension" from "L'orgue mystique" - Tournemire   "Le Jardin Suspendu" - Alain   "Diversion for Mixtures" - Francis Jackson   Toccata - Melingreau   Toccata "Suite Op.5" - Durufle   Hymne de Action de Graces "Te Deum" - Langlais   "Litanies" - Alain All modern or contemporary, but music of quality.   But would I dare to inflict it all on an audience in one go?   Certainly not!   Any of the above could be included as individual items, or perhaps a pair of them in an hour long programme, but I would always want to include something well known such as a transcription of something familiar like "Jesu Joy" or the "Bandarine", perhaps a Festing "Air and Variations" and something truly beautiful such as the Vierne "Berceuse."   Thank heavens for things like the Widor and the Bach T & F in D Minor.......people can relate to them.   Early music can be tedious or misuderstood, but dig around, and there are many, many lovely tunes, often in attractive dance rhythms, which are just a delight.   I've always maintained that ONE big work is enough....perhaps Liszt or Reger...and ONE modern or contemporary work is enough. People can go along with that, but when things just sound unfamiliar or even strange, we are in danger of alienating them from the organ for all time.   Programming should be a very serious business, geared towards specific audiences, and I shall forever be grateful to Francis Jackson for teaching me how to communicate with audiences.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- RMB10@aol.com wrote:   > I am not sure when most organists will ever get this > message. Virgil griped > about this, Ted Worth complained, Carlo Curley has > made it a point to > address this , and numerous other concert artists > who have brought the organ TO THE > PEOPLE all have figured this out. The successful > artists know that the > audience is generally not made up of other > organists, but is made up people from > the congregation and the community     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - Send 10MB messages! http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: Economics of geography and relocation From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 17:09:37 EDT   In a message dated 9/10/2004 1:35:57 PM Eastern Standard Time,=20 acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > But I sure can=E2=80=99t figure out that those reasons ARE=E2=80=94for liv= ing anywhere=20 > south of the Mason-Dixon Line. >=20 > Alan (Norwegian/Swedish genes)=20   65 degress when you are all under snow..........i guess   dale in florida of german/swiss genes  
(back) Subject: Re: Economics of geography and relocation From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 17:10:17 EDT   In a message dated 9/10/2004 1:37:12 PM Eastern Standard Time, acfreed0904@earthlink.net writes:   > >> she is in heaven on earth.... >> >> > Oh! Seattle! > > Alan >   i was guessing CINCINNATI OHIO myself   dale  
(back) Subject: Colin Mitchell mp3 added From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 16:32:07 -0500   Greetings,   British organist Colin Mitchell's splendid performance of Robert = Schumann's "Sketch in F minor" played on the 4 manual Arthur Harrison organ of = Halifax Parish Church, England, has been added to the "Downloads" section of the Organs and Organists Online website.   Enjoy!   Tim Grenz Webmaster, Organs and Organists Online http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Trinity Wall Street organ damage From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 15:36:09 -0500   We had a similar situation a couple of years ago at Holy Trinity in Winnipeg, Canada. A tiny fire actually, some rubbish set ablaze in a pew in the nave, quickly extinguished. But smoke damage was extensive enough that insurance paid for complete cleaning of the organ, ceiling of the church, etc. which took months. Interestingly, the organ was so much better and the acoustics of the church so much improved that the organist has been quoted as saying that had he known how much better everything would be, he would have lit the fire himself!   TTFN, Russ Greene       On Sep 10, 2004, at 2:51 AM, Will Light wrote:   > This was only a small > fire, which was extinguished quite rapidly and was confined to the one > small > cupboard. So it seems that the authorities took smoke damage quite > seriously. The organ was out of action for about 5 or 6 months I think.    
(back) Subject: Re: Economics of geography and relocation From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 17:32:13 -0500   <pointing at Dale>   Yup. What he said.   --Tim who grew up with west central IL winters. Since moving to Arkansas, I've decided that I positively prefer having to occasionally run the lawnmower in January, instead of the snow shovel...... ;-)   At 04:09 PM 9/10/2004, Dale wrote:   65 degress when you are all under snow..........i guess    
(back) Subject: Organ images in PowerPoint? From: "Bryan Gerlach" <BGerlach@sab.wels.net> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 18:08:17 -0500   I'm considering doing an event that is part recital, part educational.     Have any of you ever prepared a PowerPoint presentation on organs or organ music - that you're willing to share?     If so, please describe what you did and/or send me your PP file (off = list).     Bryan Gerlach    
(back) Subject: Trinity College Choir at Saint Mary's College, Moraga, CA From: "Blaine Ricketts" <blainericketts@comcast.net> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 16:40:53 -0700   THE SAINT MARY=B9S COLLEGE ORGAN SERIES and THE BISHOP JOHN CUMMINS INSTITUTE FOR CATHOLIC THOUGHT, CULTURE AND SOCIAL ACTION invite you to attend     A Solemn Mass for Peace and Justice: a "9/11" Commemoration   Mass in E-flat for Double Choir -- Joseph Rheinberger Offertory: Justorum Animae -- Charles Villers Stanford Communion: O Sacrum Convivium -- Olivier Messiaen     Most Rev. John S. Cummins, Bishop of Oakland, Retired, Presiding   The Choir of Trinity College, Cambridge   *Richard Marlow, Director *       Saturday, September 11, 2004, 6:30 p.m.   *Saint Mary=B9s College Chapel, Moraga, CA *         This solemn liturgy will feature music by one of England=B9s finest and most well-known choirs. Dr. Marlow became Organist and Director of Music at Trinity College in 1968, and he founded the mixed Choir in 1982, shortly after the admission of women undergraduates. (Isaac Newton, Francis Bacon, and Lord Byron attended Trinity College.) Since the mid-1980s, the choir has produced a total of forty CDs and a recent release won a Gramophone CD of the Year award. The Choir is heard frequently on radio in the UK and abroad, under takes several international tours per year, and has won worldwide critical acclaim for its enterprising and stylish performances.   Please join us in this prayerful and reflective service.   <http://www.stmarys-ca.edu/news_events/events/091104_commemoration.html>   <http://www.stmarys-ca.edu/about/visit/directions/moraga.html>    
(back) Subject: [OFF TOPIC] Ivan From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 20:35:43 -0500   For those of you not yet praying for Florida, please start doing so. Florida has already suffered much destruction, and Ivan is trying hard to make Charley and Frances look like merry-go-round rides. We spent this afternoon following the boss' dictates and covering up our computers and office equipment, even though we have court Monday. The gulf waters are warm and shallow, and we don't have a low pressure system or dry trough between us and the hurricane for a buffer.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Famous scholar organs quotes From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 21:11:17 -0500   Thanks! I am familar with the Handel and Dello Joio settings of this text and think it splendid indeed. I appreciate reading it again, and perhaps can use some of the phrases. Roy ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, September 09, 2004 9:46 PM Subject: RE: Famous scholar organs quotes     > No, Roy, but would commend to your perusal John Dryden's "Ode to St. > Cecilia", particularly the following stanza: > > But oh! What art can teach, > What human voice can reach > The sacred organ's praise? > Notes inspiring holy love, > Notes that win their heavenly ways > To mend the choirs above. > Orpheus could lead the savage race; > And trees unrooted left their place, > Sequacious of the lyre; > But bright Cecilia raised the wonder higher: > When to her organ vocal breath was given, > An angel heard, and straight appeared, > Mistaking earth for heaven. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Roy Redman > Sent: Thursday, September 09, 2004 9:02 PM > To: PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu > Cc: PipeChat > Subject: Famous scholar organs quotes > > I am interested in quotes from famous people about the Pipe Organ. I > remember Schweitzer "the search for the good organ is part of the search > for truth", and I have seen many others in the past. Does anyone have a > good source for these quotes?. > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Famous scholar organs quotes From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 22:28:41 EDT   Two of my favs: "My organ, it is an orchestra! If only you knew how I love it, it is so adaptable to my fingers and so docile with my respect to my ideas." Cesar = Franck.   "Live happily"-Domenico Scarlatti gfc ___________________________________________________________________________= ___ _________ _______________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ _______________________________ ________________ Gregory Francis Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Avenue # GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile _Home Email: gfc234@aol.com_ (mailto:gfc234@aol.com) _Mobile Email: gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net_ (mailto:gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net)    
(back) Subject: Re: Being Happy in Your Church From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 22:31:39 EDT   Where is a good place to retire on Social Security (no pension or = retirement benefits) and have the pleasure of attending classical organ, theater = organ, symphony, etc. concerts, and possibly the option of subbing in various churches. We both have experience in playing services for most = denominations? Lee  
(back) Subject: Organs in the U.K. From: "John Jarvis" <jljarvis@comcast.net> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 19:55:32 -0700   I could use a little advice from our friends across the pond. I will be traveling to London with my daughter and her High School band = just after Christmas (12/26) as they will be performing in a New Year's Day parade there. As I have been to London on a number of occasions and am = not an official chaperone of this group, I am going to take the time to = visit sites other than those planned for the group. =20   I would love to include as many organs as possible and hope that our = U.K. list members can provide some good information and contacts. I been to Vespers at both Westminster Abbey and St. Paul's. I've never been to = Oxford or Cambridge, so both are on my list to visit. Any help that you can provide would be greatly appreciated. I am sure that others on the list = may be interested in this information as well. Thanks in advance for your help. BTW, if there is something of = particular interest in the week before Christmas, I may travel a littler earlier = than the High School group. I am not looking forward to a long plan ride = with 120 High School age students. John Jarvis      
(back) Subject: Re: Programming From: <OMusic@aol.com> Date: Fri, 10 Sep 2004 22:58:34 EDT   Monty,   You have brought up some very good points. The organist before me played only hymn tunes with tremolo, and this is a 3 year old Allen. When I = started adding organ repertoire there were people who told me the organ was = finally sounding like an organ. I found out that there was a retired organist and = music director in the congregation who appreciated more than hymn tune = arrangements. I play a little of all types of music. I know you can't make everyone = happy, but I am there to play to "an audience of ONE." Lee