PipeChat Digest #4759 - Saturday, September 11, 2004
 
RE: Annual Dutch Dash  - apologies
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: Programming
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Organ pictures on stamps
  by "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net>
Re: Programming
  by "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com>
cheap housing
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: cheap housing
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Xpost-VT Organ Crawl
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: cheap housing
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
shutter mechanisms
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Horatio Parker _Adstant Angelorum Chori_
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
RE: Living room churches
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Horatio Parker _Adstant Angelorum Chori_
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
RE: Annual Dutch Dash  - apologies
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
Re: VT Organ Crawl
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Ren=E9 L. Becker
  by "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net>
Literary allusion to the organ
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Organ pictures on stamps
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Annual Dutch Dash - apologies From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 08:40:00 -0400   Toronto, eh? If only you could bring one of those Dutch organs AND the church it was = in. Acoustics are almost everything. I'd wager if such organ were placed in = one of the "living-room" churches that infest Toronto the "finest" organ would sound poorly. AjMead   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of Arie Vandenberg Sent: Friday, September 10, 2004 1:43 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Annual Dutch Dash - apologies     At 10:20 AM 2004-09-10 -0700, you wrote: >Hello, > >I must be getting old! > >I thought it was Arie Vandenburg who walked across >Rotterdam with his father after the bombing of >Rotterdam, but now I see that it was John Vanderlee. > >Apologies to both for the confusion. > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK   Colin,   I may be as Dutch as can be in terms of blood lines, but I was bred and born in Canada. And I think of myself as 100% Canadian. No offense taken at your confusion.   Now if we could only bring one of those fine Dutch organs you heard and bring it to the Toronto area, I would be so much happier.   Arie V.       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: Re: Programming From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 08:26:51 -0400   Lee said: "You have brought up some very good points. The organist before =   me played only hymn tunes with tremolo, and this is a 3 year old Allen. When I started adding organ repertoire there were people who told me the organ was = finally sounding like an organ. I found out that there was a retired organist and music director in the congregation who appreciated more than hymn tune arrangements. I play a little of all types of music. I know you can't make everyone = happy, but I am there to play to "an audience of ONE."   I'd add my own Amen to Monty's remarks. I'm not likely to be doing any = full length recitals anytime soon, but in selecting my service music I try to cycle through a variety of styles in hopes that at least every couple = weeks each individual member of the congregation will hear something he or she finds reasonably inspiring from a worship standpoint. I do play quite a = bit of baroque music because that's my personal preference, what I have the biggest library of, and what I do best, but I make a special effort to select pieces that are tuneful and immediately accessible to listeners who =   are likely to be unfamiliar with them. I find a lot of Walther useful in that regard. I also try to regularly work in easily-listenable romantic period things as well as transcriptions of just about anything that might = be known to the congregation--as long as it's sacred in nature and mood-appropriate. I generally save the contemporary and dissonant for the postlude, when they're jabbering their way out the door.    
(back) Subject: Organ pictures on stamps From: "Roy Redman" <rredman@imagin.net> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 08:14:52 -0500   For those who are interested: the stamps Robert Clark mentions are there = in color in the article I wrote about. Roy Redman ----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Clark" <robert.clark@cox.net> To: <rredman@imagin.net> Sent: Friday, September 10, 2004 10:06 PM Subject: <no subject>     > Dear Roy, > > While I travelled extensively in East Germany in 1978 I was given a set = of > stamps containing exquisite images of most of the existing Silbermann > organs. I found it quite moving that even in the darkest years of the = cold > war, these organs were still revered as a part of the national culture. = I > doubt that these stamps can easily be found today, but there are = possibly > collectors in cities like Dresden and Leipzig, or possibly east German > organbuilders who might have them. > > Robert Clark > > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Programming From: "littlebayus@yahoo.com" <littlebayus@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 06:36:51 -0700 (PDT)   Greetings to all!   For the past few summers I have subbed at a Christian Science church. One of their members is originally from Germany...I'll never forget her greeting to me one Sunday: "I know were going to have some good music today." When I'm subbing, the first Sunday I see that elderly, charming lady in church, I always make it a point to play at least one short Bachian piece as part of my preludes.... I say Bachian, because usually my selections come from the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues attributed to J. S. B. For preludes, I would choose from the Prelude and fugue in E minor, the Prelude and fugue in G minor, the Fugue in F major and the Prelude and fugue in G major. For a postlude, I would choose from the Prelude and Fugue in C major, the Prelude and Fugue in B flat major, and the Prelude and Fugue in D minor...   Christian Science churches like us to play for about nine minutes before the service starts, so I usually can play at least two pieces...   I don't necessarily play the JSB Eight very loud for a prelude, by the way...   As for other preludes, I use selections from Flor Peeters 60 pieces (which I hear may be going out of print, by the way, [sigh], peaceful selections by Guilmant, Everett Titcomb, and of course JSB's Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring now and then, which is always well received...   During communion, if the denomination is taking communion on a particular Sunday, I play from Dom Paul Benoit's 50 Elevations... and sometimes just familiar hymns with a communion related or sermon related text...   One of the nicest notes I got was from a neighbor who complimented me for playing familiar hymns at her mother's funeral... I was so happy to receive that note, because it was one of the first funerals I had ever played for...   Best wishes to all..     Morton Belcher fellow list member...   Yes, we should play music from different schools of music...     _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Shop for Back-to-School deals on Yahoo! Shopping. http://shopping.yahoo.com/backtoschool  
(back) Subject: cheap housing From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 08:59:18 -0500   Check smaller midwestern towns for good housing values. I saw one go at auction in our town for $6,000, and there are several on the market now = for under $30,000--and our town is a bit more stable than some, so other small towns regularly have housing stock in the $20,000 range. No, it won't be new three bedroom ranch and family room. It will probably be a "fixer upper," but it will be livable--folks are living in them now.   Choose carefully for access to a bigger city with the amenities. Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: cheap housing From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 07:10:16 -0700   That's true, but unfortunately for SOME of us, the only SAFE places to live are large cities on the coasts or in the upper Midwest, if you take my meaning.   I wouldn't live in the Deep South (except for metropolitan Atlanta or South Beach) if they GAVE me a three-bedroom house with all the trimmings.   Hmmm ... come to think of it, South Beach IS on the coast (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud   First Christian Church of Casey, IL wrote:   > Check smaller midwestern towns for good housing values. I saw one go at > auction in our town for $6,000, and there are several on the market now = for > under $30,000--and our town is a bit more stable than some, so other = small > towns regularly have housing stock in the $20,000 range. No, it won't = be > new three bedroom ranch and family room. It will probably be a "fixer > upper," but it will be livable--folks are living in them now. > > Choose carefully for access to a bigger city with the amenities. > Dennis Steckley > Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Xpost-VT Organ Crawl From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 10:54:51 -0500   If anyone is dying for an organ crawl and is disappointed that Worcester isn't doing one this year, here's one in Vermont!   AGO Vermont Chapter Organ Crawl   Sept. 26, 2004   Burlington, VT area   3:00 St. Michael's College, Colchester 2/17 Casavant, 1996   3:45 St. Paul's Cathedral, Burlington 2/31 Wilhelm, 1973   4:30 First Baptist, Burlington 2/21 Hook, 1864   5:15 First United Methodist, Burlington 3/22 Austin, 1941   5:45 First Congregational, Burlington 3/69 Estey, 1952/Russell, 1998   6:30 UVM, Burlington 4/43 Fisk, 1976   7:15 College Street Congregational, Burlington 2/25 Austin, 1958   For more information and directions, call Richard or Sallie Cartwright, = 802 872 3550 (cartrands@aol.com) or me, at 802 775 5403 or e-mail.   Paul Opel   Dean, VT Chapter AGO   http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Re: cheap housing From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 11:41:09 EDT   In case anyone is considering Washington, DC, you can now acquire the apartment next to mine off Dupont Circle -- 495 sq. ft. studio for only = $199K! Prices have roughly quadrupled here in the last 10 years. In addition to your monthly mortgage payment, there is a condo fee of $300 and you can rent an = indoor garage space for about $200 a month. Of course, if you don't have an organ = of your own, you could work something out to practice on my 2m Rodgers. = Shouldn't be a problem with a church job paying about $12K! Or you could compete for = sub jobs which pay roughly $150 a service. The apt. is open tomorrow from 1-4 = p.m. Drop by if you're in the neighborhood! Dudelsvater  
(back) Subject: shutter mechanisms From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 12:47:13 EDT   with regards to shutter mechanisms, which do you prefer -- the type that opens all the shutters incrementally at the same time, or the type that = completely opens one or two shutters at a time? and why?   (heh heh heh)  
(back) Subject: Horatio Parker _Adstant Angelorum Chori_ From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 13:24:04 -0400   Does anyone know the large double-chorus motet by Horaio Parker, Op. = 45, _Adstant Angelorum Chori_? I recently came upon a copy of the vocal score (G. Schirmer, 1899) and find the work of consummate craftsmanship, much as one might expect from Parker. I was interested, having recorded the Parker organ sonata and lived intensely with that piece for several years.   As best I sense from scanning the vocal score, it's a mixture of style based on Bach and Brahms and his old teacher in Munich Josef Rheinberger. Parker won the composition prize of the Musical Art Society in NYC in 1898 for the piece. I treasure my autographed copy of Dr. William Kerns' book = on Parker, and he reports that this group performed it that year under the direction of the late, great Frank Damrosch, to whom it is dedicated. = This is all activity, of course, during the strong Germanic or eastern-European influence era in NYC, of which even the Czech guy Dvorak was a sort of participant.   Has anyone ever actually heard this piece? Your reactions? Kearns = marks the piece in his book as one of a category that deserves a revival, = implying that it is pretty much off out of circulation.   Does anyone ever do Parker's _Hora Novissima_ any more? It used to be = done in NYC in my student days there at Union Seminary and in at least some following years. Or the Easter anthem "Light's glittering Morn?" Or is this a composer whose choral music has pretty much disappeared?   The organ sonata is a VERY worthy piece, more than just its famous and whimsical-if-tricky Allegretto movement.   I'd be interested to hear from anyone about this choral work. Thanx.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: RE: Living room churches From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 10:52:39 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Of course Andrew is absolutely right....to a point.   I think I mentioned in my "Dutch Dash" thingy, that some of the old Dutch organs are in quite small churches. The "church in the attic" Amsterdam is a classic example......virtually an attic in a warehouse, with wooden construction throughout. OK, it isn't dead acoustically, but Notre Dame it ain't.   Part of the success of that charming organ is surely to be found in the pipe-metal.....it looks almost pure lead/antimony. The sound is sombre but rich in tone, with ample rather than excessive upperwork.   In the UK, during the early part of the 19th century, there were a number of organs with a rich, singing quality, in less than flattering buildings. The few untouched examples which remain, in spite of severe restrictions in the pedal organs (usually a couple of 16ft registers only) sound thoroughly musical to my ears. The same is true of the few remaining Snetzler organs......Snetzler having worked, it is believed, on the Bavvo organ at Haarlem before travelling to the UK.   Going to opposite extreme is the Waalsekerk in Amsterdam; a substantial instrument by Muller with an abundance of high-pitched upperwork, pure tin pipes and open-foot voicing. Although not a dead church by any means, it has a nice "ring" associated with square wooden interiors, but the organ can get a little overpowering. That said, it remains musical, but slightly on the savage side of "bright."   It is easy to see why, in the very dead acoustics associated with many American and UK churches (for example), only the heavily nicked pipework of, for example, Skinner in the US or Arthur Harrison in the UK, can produce a large instrument working well in an unfavourable environment, and I for one, admire what they achieved.   I have often quoted the example of Leeds Parish Church here in the UK, which is not a VERY large building, and has galleries all around it. The acoustic is as near to an anachoic chamber as it is possible to get....absolutely zilch resonance. Nevertheless, the 85 or so rank instrument, with over 100 stops, sounds absolutely magnificent. Essentially a much modified and re-built instrument, it is, to all intents and purposes, an Arthur Harrison organ with sympathetic additions in recent years.   It is an object-lesson in how to modify pipe-speech and pipe-tone in such a building, and I always marvel at its utterly musical qualities.   I hope that nowadays, we have learned that these instruments are just as worthy as the priceless ones I heard recently in Holland.   So perhaps we should not think that a building's acoustics are everything, for they are not. It may be impossible to replicate the Schnitger sound outside a great, soaring hall church with hard, reflective surfaces, but a good organ builder can still make a great musical sound in a less than favourable building.   Of course, for a tonal artist, a poor building is the ultimate challenge, but Snetzler could do it back in the 18th century. Why do you think that there was a movement to re-create the organs inspired by William Hill/Dr Gauntlett here in the UK? It was the natural early romantic extention of what Snetzler achieved.       Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Andrew Mead <mead@eagle.ca> wrote:   > Toronto, eh? > If only you could bring one of those Dutch organs > AND the church it was in. > Acoustics are almost everything. I'd wager if such > organ were placed in one > of the "living-room" churches that infest Toronto > the "finest" organ would > sound poorly. > AjMead       _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Shop for Back-to-School deals on Yahoo! Shopping. http://shopping.yahoo.com/backtoschool  
(back) Subject: Re: Horatio Parker _Adstant Angelorum Chori_ From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 11:17:12 -0700   I don't know it, but I'd love to have a copy.   St. Matthew's choir, Newport Beach CA had both "Light's Glittering Morn Bedecks the Skies" and "Before the Heavens Were Spread (?) Abroad" in their repertoire ... both were discarded from the library of a very WELL-known Episcopal cathedral (!) ... not the cathedral mentioned below, BTW.   I seem to recall Christ Church (now Cathedral) Cincinnati doing Hora Novissima, probably during Gerre Hancock's tenure there, or possibly Searle Wright's.   They also did Elgar's Dream of Gerontius.   Cheers,   Bud   Karl Moyer wrote:   > Does anyone know the large double-chorus motet by Horaio Parker, Op. = 45, > _Adstant Angelorum Chori_? I recently came upon a copy of the vocal = score > (G. Schirmer, 1899) and find the work of consummate craftsmanship, much = as > one might expect from Parker. I was interested, having recorded the = Parker > organ sonata and lived intensely with that piece for several years. > > As best I sense from scanning the vocal score, it's a mixture of = style > based on Bach and Brahms and his old teacher in Munich Josef = Rheinberger. > Parker won the composition prize of the Musical Art Society in NYC in = 1898 > for the piece. I treasure my autographed copy of Dr. William Kerns' = book on > Parker, and he reports that this group performed it that year under the > direction of the late, great Frank Damrosch, to whom it is dedicated. = This > is all activity, of course, during the strong Germanic or = eastern-European > influence era in NYC, of which even the Czech guy Dvorak was a sort of > participant. > > Has anyone ever actually heard this piece? Your reactions? Kearns = marks > the piece in his book as one of a category that deserves a revival, = implying > that it is pretty much off out of circulation. > > Does anyone ever do Parker's _Hora Novissima_ any more? It used to be = done > in NYC in my student days there at Union Seminary and in at least some > following years. Or the Easter anthem "Light's glittering Morn?" Or = is > this a composer whose choral music has pretty much disappeared? > > The organ sonata is a VERY worthy piece, more than just its famous = and > whimsical-if-tricky Allegretto movement. > > I'd be interested to hear from anyone about this choral work. = Thanx. > > Karl E. Moyer > Lancaster PA > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: RE: Annual Dutch Dash - apologies From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 13:54:56 -0500   At 10:20 AM 2004-09-10 -0700, you wrote: >I may be as Dutch as can be in terms of blood lines, but I was bred and >born in Canada. And I think of myself as 100% Canadian. >No offense taken at your confusion. > >Now if we could only bring one of those fine Dutch organs you heard and >bring it to the Toronto area, I would be so much happier. > >Arie V.   It's not an old instrument, but darn close - across the lake from you - a Reil instrument at Redeemer College in Ancaster, ON. A good size 2 manual, =   self-contained and movable, in an auditorium setting (yes, acoustics not quite as fine as it deserves). Reil is one of the finest classic builders today, perhaps less known internationally. My grad classmate at the University of Iowa, Christiaan Teeuwsen, is (was? haven't kept up with = him) on the faculty there. Got to visit him in the early 90's and played the instrument.   John Seboldt Milwaukee, WI www.seboldt.net      
(back) Subject: Re: VT Organ Crawl From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 18:35:21 -0500   Hi Paul! I didn't know about this. Yay! Most of these are within = walking distance of me. In fact, I've heard all of them, played most of them, and =   worked on some of them. I'm not a stickler, but I see a few typos:   > AGO Vermont Chapter Organ Crawl > Sept. 26, 2004 > Burlington, VT area > > 3:00 St. Michael's College, Colchester 2/17 Casavant, 1996 (1966 -- 17th rank added in 2003 or 2004) > > 3:45 St. Paul's Cathedral, Burlington 2/31 Wilhelm, 1973 > > 4:30 First Baptist, Burlington 2/21 Hook, 1864 > > 5:15 First United Methodist, Burlington 3/22 Austin, 1941 (This could be right... I think its bigger than 22 ranks. I used to practice on it regularly. It could be true, I guess, if you don't count = the antiphonal organ) > > 5:45 First Congregational, Burlington 3/69 Estey, 1952/Russell, 1998 (No typo here, but it implies an Estey rebuild. Not really. Its a = Russell with a few Estey pedal ranks re-used, and maybe a few manual ranks completely redone. May have reused a reed or two. Console is an Austin with solid state added by Russell. Casework and facade on both front and rear organs are Russell.)   > > 6:30 UVM, Burlington 4/43 Fisk, 1976 (3 manual, don't know how many ranks, but not much more than 20. Its = really a 2 manual, with a part-compass french cornet on a third manual with no = stop action) > > 7:15 College Street Congregational, Burlington 2/25 Austin, 1958 >   But no matter. I'm excited to have one of these near me! Burlington doesn't really have any great organs, but it has a lot of good organs, including all of the above.   Andy     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Ren=E9 L. Becker From: "Robert Ehrhardt" <r_ehrh@bellsouth.net> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 19:40:44 -0500   I have a copy of the Sonata but have never played it. Looks to be = somewhere in the Guilmant mode.   Robert Ehrhardt Noel Memorial UMC, Shreveport, LA USA http://www.zimbel.com/ehrhardt.html     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> To: <PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu> Cc: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, September 10, 2004 11:05 PM Subject: Ren=E9 L. Becker     > I listened to Pipedreams this evening and was pleased to hear Becker's > Sonata No. 1--particularly the outer movements. I'm curious if anyone = owns > the sheet music to this or his other sonatas.       --- Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.754 / Virus Database: 504 - Release Date: 9/6/2004    
(back) Subject: Literary allusion to the organ From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 20:10:50 -0500   I know Roy is looking for quotes, not literary allusions, but I remember quoting Faulkner to a list friend not too long ago in defending the literary classics. Therefore, I offer the following - my quote of a quote:   "Light in August" has some seconds of beautiful imagery that float to the surface. The problem with Faulkner is that there is so much that one cannot take it all in; after a while you have to just plod and paw through it uncomprehendingly to reach some action. And the ending is so anticlimactic.   However, there is a great description of the organ - yes, the organ - in a Presbyterian church, that mirrors my own viewpoint of most church music, although Billy Bob had something different in mind:   "The organ strains come rich and resonant through the summer night, blended, sonorous, with that quality of abjectness and sublimation, as if the freed voices themselves were assuming the shapes and attitudes of crucifixions, ecstatic, solemn, and profound in gathering volume. Yet even then the music has still a quality stern and implacable, deliberate and without passion so much as immolation, pleading, asking, for not love, not life, forbidding it to others, demanding in sonorous tones death as though death were the boon, like all Protestant music. It was as though they who accepted it and raised voices to praise it within praise, having been made what they were by that which the music praised and symbolized, they took revenge upon that which made them so by means of the praise itself. Listening, he seems to hear within it the apotheosis of his own history, his own land, his own environed blood: that people from which he sprang and among whom he lives who can never take either pleasure or catastrophe or escape from either, without brawling over it. Pleasure, ecstacy, they cannot seem to bear: their escape from it is in violence, in drinking and fighting and praying; catastrophe too, the violence identical and apparently inescapable. And so why should not their religion drive them to crucifixion of themselves and one another? he thinks."   And so forth. Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Re: Organ pictures on stamps From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sat, 11 Sep 2004 21:22:17 -0400   A quick search of my own music on stamps collection reveals at least 50 pipe organs on stamps. Some of the notable ones:   Austria: Albrechtsberger/organ; Bruckner/organ Belgium: Franck/organ; 4 organs on 4 stamps Canada: Willan/organ Croatia: Livadic/organ Finland: Merkanto/organ France: Poitiers organ Germany (East): Silbermann organs Germany (West) Buxtehude/organ; Reger/organ Greenland: Peterson/organ Latvia Riga anniv. inc. pipe organ Paraguay: Schweitzer/organ Philippines Bamboo organ Wallis and Futuna: Schweitzer/organ   Many others show organ cases or pipes, but I've never taken the time to figure out where exactly they are. My list of 50 doesn't include about 75 stamps showing J.S. Bach, many of them including pipe organs. It also doesn't include postal stationery (stamped envelopes, aerograms, etc.) that also include pipe organs, nor various angels holding tiny portative organs. And there are MANY other stamps that show composers of organ music; let's not get going on that in this posting!   I made a big mistake when I started collecting music on stamps: I went for ALL kinds of music instead of limiting myself! It would be quite possible to specialize in pipe organs only and still build quite a large collection!   When music stamps began to become a little harder to find, I decided collecting postcards that show pipe organs might be additional fun. I should have limited THAT collection as well, since I have at least 8000 cards to date. Anyone out there have any from your home parishes? New cards are much harder to find than the antique ones!   Steve Best in Utica, NY