PipeChat Digest #4764 - Monday, September 13, 2004
 
Re: "Zoo" question
  by "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net>
Re: "Zoo" question
  by "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net>
Re: shutter mechanisms again
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: shutter mechanisms again
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: "Zoo" question
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: delete if not interested -- housing and hate groups
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
The Zoo
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: OFF-TOPIC: delete if not interested -- housing and hate groups
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net>
Hymn of Promise / Natalie Sleeth
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: "Zoo" question
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: "Zoo" question
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: shutter mechanisms again
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: "Zoo" question
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Zoo question
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
Re: Hymn of Promise / Natalie Sleeth
  by <Joshwwhite@aol.com>
Re: Zoo question
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" question From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 19:56:58 -0500   The opening line of the Monty Python version: "All things foul and = loathsome, all creatures short and squat, all things vile and evil, the = Lord God made the lot" might make a big hit! ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Joshwwhite@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Sunday, September 12, 2004 7:13 PM Subject: Re: "Zoo" question     In the United Methodist Hymnal, there is "God of the Sparrow, God of = the Whale", and "Hymn of Promise" that might be useful. Well, in "Hymn = of Promise", I suppose the only hint of the animal kingdom would be = butterflies and cocoons, but it is set to a very charming melody. Such = a very nice little song of hope.   The reminds me of an episode of "The Vicar of Dibley" where they had = the same sort of service, hehe, they too used "All Things Bright and = Beautifu." Josh White
(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" question From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 0:58:43 +0000   Hi listers: I guess it's just a popular song, but the words are perfectly = appropriate: "Bless The Beasts and The Children" Probably there will be some children in attendance, making it even more = appropriate . . . Regards, Roy Kersey Organ Enthusiast      
(back) Subject: Re: shutter mechanisms again From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 20:37:12 -0500   Here in vermont there aren't many individual shade actuators (haven't seen =   any yet). Our early organs are trackers, of course, and then everything after the tracker ear to the 1950's or so is Estey, and then Austin pretty =   took over, and then newer local builders like Russell and Moore, and a few =   outside tracker builders. All of the above always used traces (that I've seen so far). My first and so far only encounter with individual motors = was at Wanamakers. I don't know if the sound is any better or worse, but I'll =   say that it looks WAY cool to the audience. Wanamakers has three enclosed =   divisions where the shutters are visible to the audience, and they = recently rewired it so they really do open one at a time (they used to open 3 at a time). They did the rewiring in preparation for a recording and Peter = Conte wanted the smoothest possible crescendo for the recording. But all I can say is that seeing them open and close one at a time gives a visual "wave" =   effect that is mezmerizing. Might be worth doing just for that reason! = :) I'd be surprised if the aural effect is that much different. I'm sure plenty of theories could be proposed one way or the other. The light analogy someone mentioned is true I guess... maybe you could argue that pipes in front of the open shade will sound louder than the ones behind closed shades? Might be true. Noticable? I'd have to listen to know.   Andy     > >> btw, this e-mail was meant to spark a conversation on the subject: > >> > >> with regards to shutter mechanisms, which do you prefer -- the type that > >> opens all the shutters incrementally at the same time, or the type = that > >> completely opens one or two shutters at a time? and why? > >> > >       A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: shutter mechanisms again From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 20:47:41 -0500   BTW, I suspect that the reason individual motors were used by some is = mass- producability. One 16-stage swell motor is a big project for someone to build. Making a bunch of little single-stage actuators on an assembly = line makes a lot of sense in a factory-type setting, utilizing unskilled labor = to its fullest. Moller was a big factory setting (I've heard they even had a =   union). Were there any other builders who used them? Have any small = shops ever used them?   Andy     On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 20:37:12 -0500, Andy Lawrence wrote > Here in vermont there aren't many individual shade actuators > (haven't seen any yet). Our early organs are trackers, of course, > and then everything after the tracker ear to the 1950's or so is > Estey, and then Austin pretty took over, and then newer local > builders like Russell and Moore, and a few outside tracker builders. > All of the above always used traces (that I've seen so far). My > first and so far only encounter with individual motors was at > Wanamakers. I don't know if the sound is any better or worse, but > I'll say that it looks WAY cool to the audience. Wanamakers has > three enclosed divisions where the shutters are visible to the > audience, and they recently rewired it so they really do open one at > a time (they used to open 3 at a time). They did the rewiring in > preparation for a recording and Peter Conte wanted the smoothest > possible crescendo for the recording. But all I can say is that > seeing them open and close one at a time gives a visual "wave" > effect that is mezmerizing. Might be worth doing just for that > reason! :) I'd be surprised if the aural effect is that much > different. I'm sure plenty of theories could be proposed one way or > the other. The light analogy someone mentioned is true I guess... > maybe you could argue that pipes in front of the open shade will > sound louder than the ones behind closed shades? Might be true. > Noticable? I'd have to listen to know. > > Andy >   A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" question From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 22:02:42 EDT   In a message dated 9/12/04 5:19:21 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Miltronix2004@wmconnect.com writes:   << We're having a "service of blessing of animals" on an October = afternoon, right in the church (oh, boy!) Can anyone suggest keyboard and/or vocal music that might fit? We could = have a soloist, and/or I could use organ, piano, or synth... but I'm = scratching my head on this one. >>   I'm not crazy about your lack of enthusiasm, since I regard the pets I've = had as some of the greatest blessings I've had. We have been doing Blessing = of the Pets services at my church for several years, and the 2 hymns which = have been pretty much standard at these are "This is My Father's World" and = "Let All Things Now Living".   These services are also a great method of evangelism, as they can reach = some people who may not have given much thought to the church, and since they = are held outside, provide a visible sign of our congregation.   Richard Spittel Baltimore, MD - <A HREF=3D"http://www.stmarksluthbaltimore.org/">Click = here: St. Mark's Lutheran Church Baltimore</A> - Click on Worship and scroll = down to one picture of one of our Pet Blessings (and in the group of pictures = of Palm Sunday, I'm the Crucifer)  
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: delete if not interested -- housing and hate groups From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 22:26:03 EDT   In a message dated 9/12/04 12:15:06 AM Eastern Daylight Time, quilisma@cox.net writes:   << http://www.splcenter.org/intel/hatewatch/ and click on "hate groups map." >>   I had to check on Maryland, and was not too terribly surprised that there were several listed here. But there is one caveat to that list. They = list the towns in which the group gets it's mail - Not necessarily where their = activity is located.   The town of Sharpsburg, MD (site of the Antietam Battlefield) was listed = as having a klan group there. This could be interpreted as a bad reflection = on the town. That group had a "rally" there last weekend. They were = 'advertising' they would have 100 or so marchers. In reality they had 9. But there = were several hundred participants in other local activities which had been = planned in opposition to the 'rally'. I think that was a better reflection on the = town.   Richard Spittel  
(back) Subject: The Zoo From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 21:46:16 -0500   There is a newer hymn, "God of the Sparrow, God of the Whale."   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: OFF-TOPIC: delete if not interested -- housing and hate groups From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@prairieinet.net> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 21:50:21 -0500   Iowa had a couple of them, too. But it's the first I heard of them. You could come to central Iowa and buy a ranch home that is less than 30 years old for $45,000. Most people wouldn't give you a second look. That is of course unless you were down on your luck, or disabled or some sort. Then you would have people knocking on your door wanting to help until you couldn't stand it anymore, plus fundraisers, bakesales and the likes.     ----- Original Message ----- From: <ContraReed@aol.com>   > > and click on "hate groups map." >> > > I had to check on Maryland, and was not too terribly surprised that = there > were several listed here.    
(back) Subject: Hymn of Promise / Natalie Sleeth From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 23:03:35 EDT   Take a close(r) look at this wonderful hymn - and use it for memorial or funeral services. Its central theme is promise of resurrection, hope for = the future.   Dale G. Rider  
(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" question From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 23:04:25 EDT   In a message dated 9/12/2004 8:02:16 PM Central Daylight Time, kipsmith@getgoin.net writes: "All things foul and loathsome, all creatures short and squat, all things vile and evil, the Lord God made the lot" might make a big hit! FUNNY - but NOT!  
(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" question From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 23:10:41 EDT   The Cathedral of St. John the Divine / NYC includes in its liturgy an = annual Blessing of the Animals worship service. I've seen photos. Pets as large = as, and including, elephants and giraffes are welcome (and encouraged) to = "attend." What a wonderful experience, particularly for children and those who are "children at heart." I can just imagine Norman Coke-Jephcott's "Bishop's Prominade" for the Processional music, except that the State Trumpets = might encourage a stampede!   Dale G. Rider Independence, MO  
(back) Subject: Re: shutter mechanisms again From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 23:45:51 EDT   In a message dated 9/12/04 6:48:05 PM Pacific Daylight Time, andy@ablorgans.com writes:   > BTW, I suspect that the reason individual motors were used by some is = mass- > producability. One 16-stage swell motor is a big project for someone to =   > build. Making a bunch of little single-stage actuators on an assembly = line > makes a lot of sense in a factory-type setting, utilizing unskilled = labor to > > its fullest. Moller was a big factory setting (I've heard they even had = a > union). Were there any other builders who used them? Have any small = shops > ever used them?   i used to play a 1960 schantz that had 13-stage motors. i remember it = being very smooth.  
(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" question From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 22:53:50 -0500   Whenever I play it, I think William Mathias's "Processional" has a good = bit of humor in it. At the bottom of the 2nd page, which begins in D = minor and on for most of the third page, if not beyond, I envision a = column of elephants swaggering in procession.   Bob Lind =20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: ProOrgo53@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Sunday, September 12, 2004 10:10 PM Subject: Re: "Zoo" question     The Cathedral of St. John the Divine / NYC includes in its liturgy an = annual Blessing of the Animals worship service. I've seen photos. Pets = as large as, and including, elephants and giraffes are welcome (and = encouraged) to "attend." What a wonderful experience, particularly for = children and those who are "children at heart." I can just imagine = Norman Coke-Jephcott's "Bishop's Prominade" for the Processional music, = except that the State Trumpets might encourage a stampede!   Dale G. Rider Independence, MO  
(back) Subject: Zoo question From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 00:01:18 -0400   "His Eye is on the Sparrow" - isn't necessarily focused on an animal other than the Scriptural reference that since His [God's] eye is on the = sparrow, I know that He watches me.   The children's Christmas song, "Jesus, Our Brother, Kind and Good". Each verse after the first is sung by a different animal that might have been somewhere around the manger at the Nativity.   In light of that, I'd like to ask the following question. Lest someone again accuse me of trying to accuse someone else of something, I'd like to qualify it up front that I'm not using a judgmental tone in asking this question:   What does a "service of blessing of animals" have to do with church or = with worship? I guess the mention that it is occuring on an October afternoon indicates that this isn't taking the place of the usual worship service.   Another question - again, not meant to be posed in a judgmental tone - if this is a "service" and is being held in a church for the purpose of = calling down some kind of blessing on the animals [God's creatures, of course] in the sense that it will be a religious service, then are the cute secular pieces that were suggested really appropriate? I'm assuming that the original question about music was asked in seriousness.   Actually, I was going to suggest "Kitten on the Keys" as a joke, but somebody beat me to it.   Keith      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn of Promise / Natalie Sleeth From: <Joshwwhite@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 01:54:19 EDT   It is a charming little hymn, but I see no reason why it should be = reserved only for a memorial service. We use it about 3-4 times a year, as it presents such a message of hope. There are many hymns that have "death" = and "resurrection" in them that we sing on occasions other than memorial = services-such as "Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah," and "What Wondrous Love Is This." Perhaps this wouldn't be such a good hymn for a service for blessing = animals, I guess the "naturistic" first line sort of stood out, and I didn't bother = to read the rest of the hymn! Sorry about that. Josh White  
(back) Subject: Re: Zoo question From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 23:39:03 -0700   It's usually done around the Feast of St. Francis in October ... I don't think it's any more "out of the way" that the Blessing of the Bikes or the Blessing of the Low-Riders, both of which we have locally (grin).   Cheers,   Bud   Keith Zimmerman wrote:   > "His Eye is on the Sparrow" - isn't necessarily focused on an animal = other > than the Scriptural reference that since His [God's] eye is on the = sparrow, > I know that He watches me. > > The children's Christmas song, "Jesus, Our Brother, Kind and Good". = Each > verse after the first is sung by a different animal that might have been > somewhere around the manger at the Nativity. > > In light of that, I'd like to ask the following question. Lest someone > again accuse me of trying to accuse someone else of something, I'd like = to > qualify it up front that I'm not using a judgmental tone in asking this > question: > > What does a "service of blessing of animals" have to do with church or = with > worship? I guess the mention that it is occuring on an October = afternoon > indicates that this isn't taking the place of the usual worship service. > > Another question - again, not meant to be posed in a judgmental tone - = if > this is a "service" and is being held in a church for the purpose of = calling > down some kind of blessing on the animals [God's creatures, of course] = in > the sense that it will be a religious service, then are the cute secular > pieces that were suggested really appropriate? I'm assuming that the > original question about music was asked in seriousness. > > Actually, I was going to suggest "Kitten on the Keys" as a joke, but > somebody beat me to it. > > Keith > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >