PipeChat Digest #4765 - Monday, September 13, 2004
 
Re: "Zoo" Question
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: VT Organ Crawl
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: Onward Christian soldiers
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: IF WE COULD TALK TO THE ANIMALS
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: Onward Christian soldiers
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Onward Christian soldiers
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: "Zoo" Question
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: "Zoo" question
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: "Zoo" question
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Onward Christian soldiers
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Zoo question
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: NYC Mormon Organ "asymmetry"
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: shutter mechanisms again
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: NYC Mormon Organ "asymmetry"
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Hurricanes and Atlantic City
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re: NYC Mormon Organ "asymmetry"
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Re: Duplexed undulants at NYC LDS
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
duplexing, enclosing
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Zoo question
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: duplexing, enclosing
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
RE: shutter mechanisms again
  by "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca>
Re: shutter mechanisms again
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: shutter mechanisms again
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" Question From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 06:11:04 -0400   Bud asked "What's the one about "dogs with friendly faces?" It's in the 1940, but I can't remember the first line. Is that the same one that has "Glory to God for dappled things?"   There's a wonderful hymn in 1940 which starts "We thank Thee, Lord of Heaven, for all the joys that greet us, for all that you have given to = help us and delight us, in earth and sky and sea." I think possibly it's the = one with the "dogs with friendly faces" text.    
(back) Subject: Re: VT Organ Crawl From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 07:49:10 -0500   A couple of corrections to my earlier post (sent off before = proof-reading!):   3:00 St. Michael's College, Colchester 2/17 Casavant, 1996 (1966 -- 17th rank added in 2003 or 2004)   6:30 UVM, Burlington 4/43 Fisk, 1976 (3/43, and the Recit is a Cornet from c')   A fair variety of instruments to hear.   Paul   http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Re: Onward Christian soldiers From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 15:04:03 +0300   At my church we have not sung "Onward, Christian > Soldiers" very often since the Vietnam Conflict...Ladies and Gentlemen = of the list: > Upon what occasions could this hymn be sung? And do you think it is O. = K. to start singing it again?   Some years back my assistant organist was called Christian. We would = always have a good pub lunch on Saturdays and made it a point to include it somewhere in the afternoon's festivities, usually at a wedding, but occasionally a funeral. John Foss      
(back) Subject: Re: IF WE COULD TALK TO THE ANIMALS From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 15:11:04 +0300   Thank you Gregory - that was great! how about the Hippopotamus Song (Flanders and Song) very singable with a magnificent chorus which goes = "Mud, Mud, Glorious Mud." Now just change Mud to God and you have a hymn. = There's a Greek one as well which Donald Swan used to sing - Kokarakee kee kee , = kai exipnai kathe proi! It's hilarious - about a woman who gets woken up by = her cockerel in the morning and goes down to the market and buys several animals, each one being added collectively to the list, with the noise = they make. Perfect for a childen's service, and you might get the animals to = join in. Do you take a pooper scooper to the service? John Foss      
(back) Subject: Re: Onward Christian soldiers From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 08:14:37 -0400   I missed the original question, but have a suggestion. There is a = marvelous alternate text to St. Gertrude: "Forward through the Ages." That way, = one can sing Arthur Sullivan's marvelous tune and not feel one is being militaristic. I think, however, the little word "as" in the original text is lost on most people.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu         on 9/13/04 8:04 AM, John Foss at harkat@kat.forthnet.gr wrote:   > At my church we have not sung "Onward, Christian >> Soldiers" very often since the Vietnam Conflict...Ladies and Gentlemen = of > the list: >> Upon what occasions could this hymn be sung? And do you think it is O. = K. > to start singing it again? > > Some years back my assistant organist was called Christian. We would = always > have a good pub lunch on Saturdays and made it a point to include it > somewhere in the afternoon's festivities, usually at a wedding, but > occasionally a funeral. > John Foss > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: Re: Onward Christian soldiers From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 07:17:52 -0500   I'm not sure I quite understand what vietnam has to do with anything. The =   hymn is not encouraging physical war. It is refering to the fact that the =   Christian walk, according to the Bible, is a battle. Spiritual warfare, spiritual battles, swords, etc, are all very biblical metaphors of the Christian walk.   Andy   On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 15:04:03 +0300, John Foss wrote > At my church we have not sung "Onward, Christian > > Soldiers" very often since the Vietnam Conflict...Ladies and Gentlemen = of > the list: > > Upon what occasions could this hymn be sung? And do you think it is O. = K. > to start singing it again?     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" Question From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 07:53:58 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, September 13, 2004 5:11 AM Subject: Re: "Zoo" Question     > Bud asked "What's the one about "dogs with friendly faces?" It's in the > 1940, but I can't remember the first line. Is that the same one that has > "Glory to God for dappled things?" > > There's a wonderful hymn in 1940 which starts "We thank Thee, Lord of > Heaven, for all the joys that greet us, for all that you have given to help > us and delight us, in earth and sky and sea." I think possibly it's the one > with the "dogs with friendly faces" text.   Yes, "We thank Thee, Lord of Heaven" (No. 313 in the Hymnal of 1940) is = the one that has the "dogs with friendly faces." The text is by Jan Struther, who also wrote "Lord of all hopefulness, Lord of all joy."   "Glory be to God for dappled things" is a poem by Gerard Manley Hopkins = that has never, so far as I know, been sung as a hymn.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" question From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 06:30:10 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Well I think it is very funny, but then I'm British!   In fact, my two favourite films are the Monty Python "Life of Brian" and "The Missionary"....both examples of quirky Brit humour at it's best.   Laughter and comedy are almost always the inverse of things terribly important, tragic or meaningful, like the joke about:-   "Apart from that Mrs.Lincoln, how did you enjoy the play?"   And what organist cannot laugh at the thought of "Mr" Best playing the organ of St.George's Hall, Liverpool, and asking someone to remove the lady from the organ gallery wearing the ridiculous hat. It was Queen Victoria, and thereafter, "Mr" Best became quite proud of his title, for that is what he always remained where others got gongs and titles.   I don't expect Queen Victoria was "amused," but everyone has found the story hilarious ever since.   Humour is a powerful sword! Why else does Mr Punch beat his wife and throw the baby onto the floor?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           --- ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 9/12/2004 8:02:16 PM Central > Daylight Time, > kipsmith@getgoin.net writes: > "All things foul and loathsome, all creatures short > and squat, all things > vile and evil, the Lord God made the lot" might make > a big hit! > FUNNY - but NOT! >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - 100MB free storage! http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" question From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 06:35:16 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   OK....let's get this right.   They have Giraffes? And elephants? And children?   All in the same building?   Isn't this a little dangerous where there are children around?   Then they have a State Trumpet and start stampedes?   It sounds like fun, but surely, the NY authorities really should be informed, shouldn't they?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote:   > The Cathedral of St. John the Divine / NYC includes > in its liturgy an annual > Blessing of the Animals worship service. I've seen > photos. Pets as large as, > and including, elephants and giraffes are welcome > (and encouraged) to "attend." > What a wonderful experience, particularly for > children and those who are > "children at heart." I can just imagine Norman > Coke-Jephcott's "Bishop's > Prominade" for the Processional music, except that > the State Trumpets might encourage > a stampede! > > Dale G. Rider > Independence, MO >       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? New and Improved Yahoo! Mail - 100MB free storage! http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: Onward Christian soldiers From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 08:42:37 -0600   Good Morning, John Foss, et al: Singing "Onward, Christian Soldiers" . . . . The similitude of the hymn text is in support of the Scriptures recorded in Ephesians, where Saint Paul admonised all of us to " put on the whole armor of God." What is so often missed in the teaching based on this text is what do you do when you get the "whole armor of God on?" The answer is to PRAY. Prayer is where the battle is waged, and God Himself is the one who engages the battle. PRAYING is a real mature task, not for the faint hearted nor the faithless. We could spend many pages explaining this again, but I would encourage you to read the passages in Ephesians for yourself, . . .with the understanding that the battle hymn is calling for people to be fully engaged in PRAYER. Saint Paul even tells us what to pray for. Go, thou, and do likewise. <smiles> OH, and lift the song in full voice with trumpets and organs and cymbals, etc., etc., etc. . . . . F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Zoo question From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 06:44:27 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I reckon God had a sense of humour.     "All curious merecats, laughing hyenas, smiling dolphins and owls which swivel their heads, praise the Lord!"   I don't think it stops at whales and feathered fowls.   Is it a pre-requisite that Christians have to be dull?   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- Keith Zimmerman <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> wrote:   > > What does a "service of blessing of animals" have to > do with church or with > worship? I guess the mention that it is occuring on > an October afternoon > indicates that this isn't taking the place of the > usual worship service. > > Another question - again, not meant to be posed in a > judgmental tone - if > this is a "service" and is being held in a church > for the purpose of calling > down some kind of blessing on the animals [God's > creatures, of course] in > the sense that it will be a religious service, then > are the cute secular > pieces that were suggested really appropriate     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Y! Messenger - Communicate in real time. Download now. http://messenger.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: NYC Mormon Organ "asymmetry" From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 10:22:38 EDT     In a message dated 09/12/04 1:53:40 PM, bnorth@intergate.ca writes:   << Interesting that the exposed pipes are not totally symmetrical.>>   Actually, that is of no interest, if what I think you think you are saying is actually what you think you think you are saying. A cursory glance at any pipe organ will reveal that if pipes are built = to their natural lengths, no two pipes in the same rank are the same length = or the same diameter, with very few exceptions, which would be quite = difficult to explain to the uninitiated (you don't really want me to go into the = concept of "pinched scaling" and "variable scaling" here). Search the archives of the various chat lists, and pick up any book or = on of countless articles on organbuilding, and you will likely find plenty of =   material on what are often referred as the "C side" and "C-sharp side" of = a pipe organ.    
(back) Subject: Re: shutter mechanisms again From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 10:45:25 -0400   Theater Organ Enthusiasts swear by the single-shade variety. Since expression demands are extreme in theater music, there might be a lesson here.   In my own experience, I have seen incredibly effective expression with either method. It would be my guess that this is another discussion that is useless because there is no universal truth. (Organs ain't and never-will-be black-and-white)   Too many factors contribute to the effectiveness of expression, so it must be judged on a case by case basis.     Jim         On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 23:45:51 EDT BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes: In a message dated 9/12/04 6:48:05 PM Pacific Daylight Time, andy@ablorgans.com writes:     BTW, I suspect that the reason individual motors were used by some is mass- producability. One 16-stage swell motor is a big project for someone to build. Making a bunch of little single-stage actuators on an assembly line makes a lot of sense in a factory-type setting, utilizing unskilled labor to its fullest. Moller was a big factory setting (I've heard they even had a union). Were there any other builders who used them? Have any small shops ever used them?     i used to play a 1960 schantz that had 13-stage motors. i remember it being very smooth.     *There are 10 types of people in the world: Those that understand binary, and those that don't.*
(back) Subject: Re: NYC Mormon Organ "asymmetry" From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 11:03:47 -0400     > Actually, that is of no interest, if what I think you think you are >saying is actually what you think you think you are saying. > What I think he thought he was saying, and very possibly what he thought he was saying IS of interest if he thought he was saying what he thought he was saying, as I understand his thinking possibly to be.   Many pipe organs have been and are built with facades of playing and unplaying pipes that match, symmetrically.   Quite recently, in the pipe organ trade, it has also become the fashion to show the pipes as they actually appear, as initially espoused by Holtkamp, so you will see pipes of varying height and diameter, as they would appear if hidden in a chamber behind the facade we discussed above.   --   noel jones, aago noeljones@frogmusic.com ----------------------------------- 1 877 249-5251 Athens, TN USA   www.frogmusic.com Rodgers Organ Users Group Frog Music Press - Organ and MIDI Music FMP Organ Music Search Service Rodgers Organ Design & Voicing Services    
(back) Subject: Hurricanes and Atlantic City From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 11:25:30 -0400   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: NYC Mormon Organ "asymmetry" From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 10:27:52 -0500   I just took another look at the organ and noticed another thing I like = about the design... the celeste is duplexed to the great. I've never seen that done, but often wished it were so, and wondered why it wasn't done. I = mean, I know why it isn't done, its because everyone thinks celestes dont' go in =   the great. But if its on unit action, might as well provide a stop for it =   on the great! So much better flexibility! Now if we could extend that celeste down to low C... but I know that's a lot of money   Andy     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Duplexed undulants at NYC LDS From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 12:00:47 EDT   Since the Gemshorn was going to be on a unit to chest anyway (there = was neither room nor money for a 4' Principal in the Swell), I asked the = consultant if I could place the undulant on a unit action, too, so that one might be able to accompany any soli played in the Swell with its own = accompanimental stops. While it is unfortunate that the out-of-phase Gemshorn descends only = to C13, the funds went toward some other items, such as the full-length Trombonesque 16' Trumpet Bass and the 16' open metal in the Pedal = department, which makes a big difference. It permits me to voice the Pedal 16'-8'-4' unit on = the gentler side. Fortunately, the room is live and bright enough that a Mixture was unnecessary, and I suggested the two mutations in the Swell. I have since = been informed by LDS organists that the performance of organ literature is a = rarity, and that there are few opportunities to use the mutations; nonetheless, it is going to be a full, warm, and colorful sound in light of limited funds and = space. Since organists are not compensated financially in the Mormon Church, most of the organists are pianists who are unfamiliar with the pipe organ, = its literature, or performance techniques. I tried to make the nomenclature = simple and the design straightforward, with minimal gadgetry for a user-friendly keydesk.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: duplexing, enclosing From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 09:17:49 -0700   Thankfully some builders are once again considering the FUNCTION of a church organ in their designs: ACCOMPANYING.   I've never been shy about saying that if an organ has but two manuals, then either the Great needs to be partially enclosed, or a good deal of the Swell needs to be duplexed to the Great manual.   Alternatively, some VERY good builders have rediscovered duplexing softer Great (and even Swell) stops to a third manual to make a "composite" Choir organ.   None of this is new, of course ... it was quite common in the 1920s ... the scaling and distribution needs updated, but the principle is valid for an organ whose main function is accompanying a choral service.   GREAT   (exposed)   8' Open Diapason 4' Octave 2' Fifteenth   (enclosed and duplexed from Swell)   8' Stopped Diapason 8' Viola 4' Flute 8' Trumpet   Or, alternatively:   GREAT   (exposed)   8' First Open Diapason 4' Octave 2' Fifteenth   (enclosed)   8' Second Open Diapason 8' Chimney Flute 8' Gemshorn 4' Gedeckt   CHOIR   (enclosed, duplexed from Great)   8' Open Diapason (gt. 2nd open) 8' Gedeckt 8' Gemshorn 8' Gemshorn Celeste 4' Octave (gt. 2' Fifteenth) 4' Chimney Flute   And so forth ... those aren't complete specs, BTW (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: Zoo question From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 17:28:24 +0100   Isn't it a Lenny Bruce joke that ... "Of course God has a sense of humour ......... have you ever seem two human-beings making love ?"   Then, of course, to keep things musical and 'on-topic' .......... Why else =   did he allow us to 'invent' the Vile - lin ?   Harry Grove [a.k.a. separated from most of the world's inhabitants by a common = language]     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, September 13, 2004 2:44 PM Subject: Re: Zoo question     > Hello, > > I reckon God had a sense of humour.    
(back) Subject: Re: duplexing, enclosing From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 11:35:30 -0500   At 11:17 AM 9/13/2004, you wrote: >I've never been shy about saying that if an organ has but two manuals, >then either the Great needs to be partially enclosed, or a good deal of >the Swell needs to be duplexed to the Great manual.   Moller was a master at this. One of my favorite organs was a duplexed ten rank Moller where the Swell Diapason was duplexed to the Great as a 4ft Principal which worked very well with the larger scaled Great Diapason. The Swell Stopped Diapason worked well duplexed down to = the Great as a four foot Flute D'amour. I know the purists must be gnashing their teeth, but it was certainly the way to get a versatile service organ out of a small instrument. This organ was a conglomeration of straight pipe work, duplexed stops and a unit flute 16, 8, 4 2 2/3 and 2, a Vox inna Box...all the things the purist hate nicely fitted into one package.   Jon      
(back) Subject: RE: shutter mechanisms again From: "Andrew Mead" <mead@eagle.ca> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 14:44:41 -0400   Any Wicks organs I've seen have the individual units for their expression shutters. AjMead -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of = Jim McFarland Sent: Monday, September 13, 2004 10:45 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: shutter mechanisms again     Theater Organ Enthusiasts swear by the single-shade variety. Since expression demands are extreme in theater music, there might be a lesson here.   In my own experience, I have seen incredibly effective expression with either method. It would be my guess that this is another discussion that = is useless because there is no universal truth. (Organs ain't and = never-will-be black-and-white)   Too many factors contribute to the effectiveness of expression, so it = must be judged on a case by case basis.     Jim         On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 23:45:51 EDT BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes: In a message dated 9/12/04 6:48:05 PM Pacific Daylight Time, andy@ablorgans.com writes:     BTW, I suspect that the reason individual motors were used by some = is mass- producability. One 16-stage swell motor is a big project for = someone to build. Making a bunch of little single-stage actuators on an = assembly line makes a lot of sense in a factory-type setting, utilizing unskilled labor to its fullest. Moller was a big factory setting (I've heard they even had a union). Were there any other builders who used them? Have any = small shops ever used them?     i used to play a 1960 schantz that had 13-stage motors. i remember it being very smooth.     *There are 10 types of people in the world: Those that understand binary, and those that don't.*  
(back) Subject: Re: shutter mechanisms again From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 11:49:02 -0700   I recall a Wicks in an A-frame church that had a triangular swell box and a pyramid chest ... the smallest shades opened first, from the extreme right and left sides to the tallest shades in the middle ... and the crescendo was VERY smooth.   I've also seen organs by other builders where the first couple of shades in a normal vertical square frame were divided into two, or even three sections, so that one didn't get a big rush of sound when the first shade opened.   If the shades open horizontally (as in a high west gallery installation) it can also work to have the LOWEST shade open first, but only half-way.   Cheers,   Bud   Andrew Mead wrote:   > Any Wicks organs I've seen have the individual units for their > expression shutters. > AjMead > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf > Of Jim McFarland > Sent: Monday, September 13, 2004 10:45 AM > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Re: shutter mechanisms again > > Theater Organ Enthusiasts swear by the single-shade variety. Since > expression demands are extreme in theater music, there might be a > lesson here. > > In my own experience, I have seen incredibly effective expression > with either method. It would be my guess that this is another > discussion that is useless because there is no universal truth. > (Organs ain't and never-will-be black-and-white) > > Too many factors contribute to the effectiveness of expression, so > it must be judged on a case by case basis. > > > Jim > > > > > On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 23:45:51 EDT BlueeyedBear@aol.com > <mailto:BlueeyedBear@aol.com> writes: > > In a message dated 9/12/04 6:48:05 PM Pacific Daylight Time, > andy@ablorgans.com writes: > >> BTW, I suspect that the reason individual motors were used by >> some is mass- >> producability. One 16-stage swell motor is a big project for >> someone to >> build. Making a bunch of little single-stage actuators on an >> assembly line >> makes a lot of sense in a factory-type setting, utilizing >> unskilled labor to >> its fullest. Moller was a big factory setting (I've heard >> they even had a >> union). Were there any other builders who used them? Have >> any small shops >> ever used them? > > > > i used to play a 1960 schantz that had 13-stage motors. i > remember it being very smooth. > > > > *There are 10 types of people in the world: > Those that understand binary, and those that don't.*      
(back) Subject: Re: shutter mechanisms again From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 14:51:36 -0400   <<I've also seen organs by other builders where the first couple of shades =   in a normal vertical square frame were divided into two, or even three sections, so that one didn't get a big rush of sound when the first shade opened.>>   bud, that's the way this organ is built -- shutters in two rows.   question -- what is the difference when the lowest horizontal shade opens = first, as opposed to the highest one?   scot in spokane