PipeChat Digest #4772 - Thursday, September 16, 2004
 
RE: Christ Church Cathedral
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Jerusalem
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Jerusalem
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
L'Shanah Tovah
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Blessing of the Animals and Jeruslaem
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Swell Shutters
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Recital in Methuen this Friday
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
If you like Pisgah, you like Outer Hebrides
  by "John Jarvis" <jljarvis@comcast.net>
Re: Keith Thompson at Grace Cathedral, San Francisco
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Moller Nightmare Shutters
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Request for Info on Henri Dallier X-posted
  by "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com>
Re: "Zoo" question
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Jerusalem
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: Jerusalem (setting the Story straight)
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
RE: Jerusalem
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Christ Church Cathedral From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 16:54:15 -0500   Given that one's idea of "good" acoustics probably differs from another's, it was my mistake to term the acoustics in the Cathedral "good." I remember the acoustics being rather live-and upon hearing Pat Partridge play a service in the room and having a couple of hours to play the organ myself-I thought they were "good," at least in context of hearing that service music and organ repertoire on that organ. =20   =20   I'm not sure why they would be considered "far from good." The space is vast enough to account for a non-reflective material being used as the interior finish-and John's right, the organ does sound "very good."   =20   Daniel=20   Springfield, Missouri   =20   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of John L. Speller Sent: Wednesday, September 15, 2004 4:46 PM To: PipeChat Subject: Re: Christ Church Cathedral   =20   The organ is an Aeolian-Skinner from 1965 with a few tonal changes by Quimby Pipe Organs. They have never had a Reuter, except a small one in their chapel in the 1920's. The chapel now has a Moller rebuilt by Aeolian-Skinner. The inside of the cathedral is covered with Gustavino tiles, and although these have been painted with many layers of sound-reflective paint the acoustics are from good. The organ, however, sounds very good in spite of this.   =20   John Speller   =20  
(back) Subject: Re: Jerusalem From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 18:12:20 EDT   Regarding the singing of "Battle Hymn of the Republic" in Southern = churches, when I first moved to South Carolina out of college, my pastor told me a story of why my church would never sing that song. When my former church = split from it's parent church, it took with it most of the choir, elders and deacons, so a lot of the history was taken along with it--and the baggage = that comes with it, too. It seems that some years back, the music director at = the mother church had programmed the Wilhousky arrangement for the Sunday = right before 4th of July. The choir had no problems singing it, as they felt it = was a nice arrangement and that it was appropriate for the day. However, there =   were some older people in the congregation who didn't feel that way. One =   elderly man stood up during the singing of the song and shouted for the = choir to stop singing that "Yankee" song in a Southern church and caused a big = ruckus. The choir stopped singing, and effectively the minister stood up, gave = the benediction and everyone went home. So, the minister I worked with said = that he felt it was a good policy to abide by, since some of the elderly = members probably still felt that way. When I got to the church, the church had = since split, switched denominations (my church was PCA, the mother church = PCUSA), and had another pastor. Many in my choir remembered the incident, = however. They would laugh about it. My pastor told me that the way he felt we = should get around the song was by saying that the author of the hymn was a = Unitarian and that the Elders didn't feel that it was appropriate to sing a song by = a Unitarian in a trinitarian, evangelical church. That was better than = pointing out the Southern vs. Yankee thing, even though we all know that things = are better in the South, otherwise all the Yankees wouldn't be moving down = here invading our space, but that's something for another day and time = LOLOLOL Just Kidding!!!!! Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Jerusalem From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 18:26:21 EDT   Monty and list,   I worked for an unreconstructed organist and choirmaster in a church in = Texas who had a personal aversion to the "Battle Hymn". It WAS sung there, once = a year so, begrudgingly, he would play it. However, his revenge always came = at the Postlude, when he would improvise a fugue(!) on "Dixie".   This church wasn't ALL "new South", however. I succeeded this man as choirmaster for a short time upon his death. One Sunday, the minister was = to preach on Exodus. I suggested that we should sing "We Shall Overcome", which was in = the hymnal. The pastor quickly nixed the idea: "some of our older parishioners =   are still sore over the civil rights movement", he said. "Many of them = lost their maids". I kid you not, that's what he said!   Pax, Bill H. Boston      
(back) Subject: L'Shanah Tovah From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 18:43:20 EDT   To All it may concern:   L'Shana Tova........   Hope the new year brings you success and happiness, if not a trip to Jerusalem!   dale in Florida missing really badly directing the music at a reform = temple in Cinti Ohio---especially the next month.  
(back) Subject: Blessing of the Animals and Jeruslaem From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 18:21:42 -0500   Margo, my cats bless me every day, all five of them, plus four outdoor strays I feed!   www.cyberhymnal.org says this about Jerusalem: Words: Will=ADiam Blake, cir=ADca 1804 (some sourc=ADes at=ADtrib=ADute the first two lines to John= Mil=ADton). Music: =93Je=ADru=ADsalem (Par=ADry),=94 Charles H. H. Par=ADry, 1916 (MI= =ADDI, score).     Hav=ADing be=ADgun work on his epic po=ADems =93Mil=ADton, a Po=ADem in Two= Books=94 and =93Je=ADru=ADsa=ADlem,=94 on moving to Fel=ADpham, Sus=ADsex, in 1800, Blak= e com=ADplet=ADed his Preface to Milton in 1804, ap=ADpar=ADent=ADly while await=ADing trial= in Chi=ADches=ADter for high treason (he moved back to Lon=ADdon af=ADter be= =ADing ac=ADquit=ADted).   Charles Parry set Blake=92s Preface to Milton to mu=ADsic for a ral=ADly of= the =93Fight for the Right=94 move=ADment in Queen=92s Hall. It be=ADcame more gen=ADer=ADal=ADly known as =93Je=ADru=ADsa=ADlem=94 when Par=ADry con=ADdu= ct=ADed it in 1918 at a con=ADcert to mark the fi=ADnal stage in the Votes for Wo=ADmen Cam=ADpaign= , af=ADter which it was adopt=ADed by the Na=ADtion=ADal Fed=ADer=ADa=ADtion of Wo=ADm= en=92s In=ADsti=ADtutes (and is still sung at meet=ADings of WI Groups all over Br= itain). Ed=ADward El=ADgar added an or=ADches=ADtral score to Parry=92s rather som= =ADber tune in time for the Leeds Fes=ADti=ADval of 1922, turn=ADing it in=ADto a pop=ADul= ar na=ADtion=ADal hymn which tra=ADdi=ADtion=ADal=ADly ends the last night of= the an=ADnu=ADal Sir Henry Wood prom=ADen=ADade con=ADcerts at the Roy=ADal Al=ADbert Hall.= This work al=ADso made an ap=ADpear=ADance in the 1981 Acad=ADe=ADmy Award win=ADning= mo=ADvie Chariots of Fire.   The theme is unique=ADly Eng=ADlish, and there is an un=ADder=ADtone of 19t= h Cen=ADtu=ADry pol=ADi=ADtics. The lyr=ADics may refer to folk=ADlore that s= ays Je=ADsus vis=ADit=ADed Bri=ADtain as a teen=ADag=ADer with Jo=ADseph of Ar=ADi=ADma= =ADthea, who was said to be a dis=ADtant rel=ADa=ADtive and had a stake in Cor=ADnish tin mi= nes. How=ADev=ADer, there is no his=ADtor=ADic=ADal da=ADta sup=ADport=ADing thi= s sto=ADry.   END QUOTE   BTW, can anyone scan me the hymn about the laughing dog from The Hymnal 1940? I don't happen to have that hymnal on hand (I know, I know-I SHOULD have it, but I don't!). TIA   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines   19  
(back) Subject: Re: Swell Shutters From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 16:48:17 -0700 (PDT)   Hi List, I visited the mighty Moller yesterday, here is what I found... The motors use two valves, the primary is on the top of the unit, the = larger secondary is down below next to the magnet. The primary is exhaust to = close and the secondary is inflate to close. On the older Mollers, the shades are held open by compass springs, later examples have coil springs holding the shades open. To check the secondary valves, just push them in to see what happens, beware of sharp ends on the valve wires. If the secondary valves do nothing, check for a bad motor. If the secondary valves work, = try to fire them by pulling out the primary valves on top. If the primary = valve doesn't fire it, you probably have a bad secondary pouch. If the primary valve does work, poke the magnet armature to fire the whole thing. If = that doesn't work, you might have a bad primary pouch. If that works, you = likely have a dead magnet or some sort of electrical issue. You might find it helpful to inventory your shades! Good luck! - Nate    
(back) Subject: Recital in Methuen this Friday From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 18:56:27 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List Friends, Please excuse this bit of shameless self-promotion: I will be playing the = Fall Scholarship recital in the series at the Methuen Memorial Music Hall = in Methuen, Massachusetts this Friday at 8:00 p.m. The organ is the famous = Walcker/Treat/Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner/Andover organ originally built for = the Boston Music Hall. I will be playing the following program: Prelude and Fugue in C Major (9/8), BWV 547 - J.S. Bach Passacaglia (from the opera, "Katerina Izmailova") - Dmitry Shostakovich Two movements from the Uzbek Suite - Georgi Mushel Four Versets on "Ave Maris Stella" - Marcel Dupre' Variations on "America" - Charles Ives Symphonie III: Final - Louis Vierne I always love playing at Methuen. This will be my third time to play = there, and I love the hall, the organ, and the very warm and enthusiastic = audiences. There's no place quite like it, in my experience. If any of = you come, please do say "hello" after the concert. I always enjoy meeting = members of the list whenever I play, and I'd love to see you there! Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT USA  
(back) Subject: If you like Pisgah, you like Outer Hebrides From: "John Jarvis" <jljarvis@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 19:08:08 -0700   A few weeks ago, there were several emails to this list that mentioned a Dale Wood piece entitled "Pisgah". I finally laid my hands on a copy of that piece earlier this week and immediately thought of a piece by Paul Halley called "Outer Hebrides A Fantasia on Three Traditional Celtic Melodies". The Halley piece is a little more challenging than the Dale = Wood piece but I have thoroughly enjoyed learning and performed it. Outer Hebrides has lots of syncopation and triplets much like Pisgah.   I hope you will enjoy Outer Hebrides as much as I have. It's published = on Pelgagos at www.pelagosmusic.com <http://www.pelagosmusic.com/>=20   =20   John    
(back) Subject: Re: Keith Thompson at Grace Cathedral, San Francisco From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 23:58:12 EDT   In a message dated 9/14/2004 9:31:02 PM Eastern Standard Time, blainericketts@comcast.net writes: And the organ at Grace Cathedral is up to all of the music that I have chosen. It is in fine form these days now that it is back under the talented hands of Edward Millington Stout III to be its loving curator. It is "back under the talented hands of EMS"!?!?!?!? What happened, and = why was it ever NOT in his hands, pray tell? This has gotta be a good = story...     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Moller Nightmare Shutters From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 23:58:11 EDT   In a message dated 9/14/2004 8:10:03 PM Eastern Standard Time, RMaryman@aol.com writes: Assuming that the swell motor assemblies are the original MOller units, = $250 per motor is a bit pricey in my opinion. Anybody who has seen these motors would think that $250 is quite = reasonable to rebuild them. They have primary and secondary pouch valves, the power pneumatic MUST have cardboard stiffeners (6 pieces in the original). They = are extrememly difficult to remove and install, usually requiring the removal = of pipes (and storage of same, probably not in the chamber), plus removal and releathering of the reservoir, which is probably hung near the top of the = chamber. After they are rebuilt and installed, there are several adjustments that = need to be make as to the amount of air going into the various motor chambers, adjusting the speed of opening and closing, positioning of the springs = (some of which undoubtedly need replacing). Dreadful job.     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Request for Info on Henri Dallier X-posted From: "Larry Wheelock" <llwheels@mac.com> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 23:02:45 -0500   I am looking for biographical material -- anything at all really about Henri Dallier. I have done a number of web-searches and found his dates but the only page with extensive material is totally in French which I can not read. Has anyone out there info for a program blurb? Larry Wheelock Director of Music Ministries Kenwood United Methodist Church Milwaukee, Wisconsin musicdirector@kenwood-umc.org
(back) Subject: Re: "Zoo" question From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 00:41:17 EDT   In a message dated 9/15/2004 7:14:56 AM Central Daylight Time, dillardm@airmail.net writes:   The only thing I always think about "blessing the animals" is that it is backwards - they should bless us. They are the ones unencumbered by original sin or malice.... Animals DO bless us - - - -   sit quietly and stare into an aquarium;   allow a cat to jump up and sit in your lap and gently stroke the back = of its head and the length of its back and see what happens;   accept the eager welcome of the family dog when you arrive at home at day's end;   at such times God allows me to completely forget about original sin = and any malice I (may) have felt toward anyone that day.     Dale G. Rider Independence, MO  
(back) Subject: Re: Jerusalem From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 08:01:04 +0300   Dear list,       Now, this is a post I did start! It was a follow on from the Onward Christian Soldiers discussion and concerned intolerant Church authorities.       If you look at my post "Subject: Jerusalem From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 07:49:12 +0300"       and got far enough - I can quite understand your having given up before then - I included the following, which I found on Google:       "Charles Parry set Blake's Preface to Milton to music for a rally of the "Fight for the Right" movement in Queen's Hall. It became more generally known as "Jerusalem" when Parry conducted it in 1918 at a concert to mark the final stage in the Votes for Women Campaign, after which it was = adopted by the National Federation of Women's Institutes (and is still sung at meetings of WI Groups all over Britain). Edward Elgar added an orchestral score to Parry's rather somber tune in time for the Leeds Festival of = 1922, turning it into a popular national hymn which traditionally ends the last night of the annual Sir Henry Wood promenade concerts at the Royal Albert Hall. This work also made an appearance in the 1981 Academy Award winning movie Chariots of Fire."       John Foss   Dr John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> wrote I seem to remember from somewhere that Parry wrote the tune of "Jerusalem" for the Women's Suffrage movement. Does anyone know if this is true?      
(back) Subject: Re: Jerusalem (setting the Story straight) From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 01:07:36 EDT   Thank you, JOHN.     THANK YOU!!!!  
(back) Subject: RE: Jerusalem From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2004 09:48:21 +0100   Many years ago, I heard a story about a Theatre Organist in the deep = south somewhere. He was sacked by the manager, and told to leave after the Saturday night show. The organist chose as his final parting postlude, "Marching through Georgia". The audience rioted and wrecked the theatre. = By the time the manager came looking for him, the organist was long gone!   Can anyone tell me if there was any basis in fact for this story, or is = it interesting but apocryphal?=20   =20   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of DERREINETOR@aol.com Sent: 15 September 2004 23:26 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Jerusalem   =20   Monty and list,   I worked for an unreconstructed organist and choirmaster in a church in Texas who had a personal aversion to the "Battle Hymn". It WAS sung = there, once a year so, begrudgingly, he would play it. However, his revenge = always came at the Postlude, when he would improvise a fugue(!) on "Dixie".   This church wasn't ALL "new South", however. I succeeded this man as choirmaster for a short time upon his death. One Sunday, the minister = was to preach on Exodus. I suggested that we should sing "We Shall Overcome", = which was in the hymnal. The pastor quickly nixed the idea: "some of our older parishioners are still sore over the civil rights movement", he said. = "Many of them lost their maids". I kid you not, that's what he said!   Pax, Bill H. Boston