PipeChat Digest #4776 - Saturday, September 18, 2004
 
Scotch College Console, Melbourne
  by "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com>
Re: Organ Study
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
RE: "Rockingham" in Mendelssohn 6 last mov't
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Re: Organ Study
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: "Rockingham" in Mendelssohn 6 last mov't
  by <Georgewbayley@aol.com>
Briston Organworks instrument
  by <RVScara@aol.com>
Re: Briston Organworks instrument
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Briston Organworks instrument
  by <gdeboer@bluemarble.net>
Re: "Rockingham" in Mendelssohn 6 last mov't
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Organ Study
  by "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com>
Unusual Complaint!!
  by <Georgewbayley@aol.com>
Re: Unusual Complaint!!
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Unusual Complaint!!
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Unusual Complaint!!
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Unusual Complaint!!
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Unusual Complaint!!
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
RE: Unusual Complaint!!
  by <Innkawgneeto@cs.com>
Unusual Complaint vs. Unusually Compliant
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
horror stories
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Unusual Complaint!!
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Unusual Complaint vs. Unusually Compliant
  by <Georgewbayley@aol.com>
Re: Unusual Complaint vs. Unusually Compliant
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Unusual Complaint!!
  by <Georgewbayley@aol.com>
irremoveable rectors
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Scotch College Console, Melbourne From: "Mark Quarmby" <mark_quarmby@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 22:00:50 +1000   John Foss said: >=20 > The 1930 H N & B organ in Scotch College assembly hall, Melbourne, was > originally in a Church in Sydney, but was transplanted and restored by th= e > South Island Organ Company and Peter D. G. Jewkes earlier this year. The = case > is new and the console is a restoration of another H N & B console - I ca= n't > remember exactly where it comes from, but maybe someone on the list will = be > able to tell us. I know that it was particularly suitable, as it had virt= ually > the right number of stops.   The case came from another Hill, Norman & Beard organ which was recently restored in St John's Anglican Church Toorak, in Melbourne. This organ was returned to its original turn of the century Hill & Son specification and voicing and a new Hill & Son style console was provided. The ivory stop knobs on the Scotch organ came from my old organ - the 1952 Hill, Norman & Beard organ in St Andrew's Cathedral, Sydney. The old console was broken up when L=E9tourneau restored and enlarged the Hill in 1998 with a new tracker console and various parts were kept, like the ivory stop knobs to be used o= n other organs.   Cheers,   Mark     ------ End of Forwarded Message    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Study From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 06:26:50 -0700 (PDT)   Hi List, Thanks for the many encouraging responses! I look forward to finding a teacher and digging in - I'll let you know how it goes. For now, I like to practice Hymns daily. So far, most of my practice = has been done at home on the keyboard, although I do have daily access to a bunch of organs. My practice thus far has been to pick out random Hymns that I either have never seen or have forgotten, and play them. I will generally read through them once, warts and all, and then play them = through one more time. After 2 times I generally flip to another one. Although = my speed is not acceptable I do see an improvement since I started really = going for it. I like to read all four parts and play them all with my hands. = If I just play the SAT parts I can cruise pretty fast. I read Hymns out of = the 1940, 1982, and Worship His Majesty (Baptist) Hymnals. My biggest battle has been fighting my ear, but I have learned to ignore the perfect pitch = and just read. Does any of this sound dangerous to you? Once in a while I will take on a Choral Prelude out of my Edwin Arthur Kraft book. So far, I legitimately read and learned Herzlich Thut Mich Verlangen, although I have it memorized now. Right now I am starting = Erbarm Dich Mein, o Herre Gott, and I'll probably do In Dulci Jubilo after = that. What do you think? Best, - Nate    
(back) Subject: RE: "Rockingham" in Mendelssohn 6 last mov't From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 14:57:26 +0100   Wow Karl! He's right. I've been playing that as a voluntary for about 50 = odd years and never made the connection, so you're not the only one who's = "slow at the switch", whatever that might mean!   Will Light Coventry UK     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Karl E. Moyer Sent: 17 September 2004 19:33 To: PipeChat; organchat@yahoogroups.com; anglican-music@list.stsams.org Subject: "Rockingham" in Mendelssohn 6 last mov't   Dear Y'All,   Listening to a broadcast on public radio in Harrisburg PA of Felix Hell's senior recital at Curtis last April, I was intrigued by the announcer's comment that the quiet, closing movement of Mendelssohn = sonata 6 utilizes the melody of the "Rockingham" tune. I looked at it, and = indeed, the first half of the tune does appear in ever-so-slightly altered = manner in Mendelssohn's concluding movement.   Now, I'm really slow at the switch -- that's repeatable! ;-) -- = but this was the first I've ever heard this statement. Am I just a slow learner living out here in the PA Dutch boonies of Pennsylvania, or is = this new to others who read these lists?   Just curious. And also indebted to the announcer of Felix's Curtis recital recording.   Danke sch=F6n.=20   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Study From: <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 10:01:11 EDT   In a message dated 9/18/2004 9:27:23 AM Eastern Daylight Time, erzahler@sbcglobal.net writes: .. My biggest battle has been fighting my ear, but I have learned to ignore the perfect pitch = and just read. Does any of this sound dangerous to you? once your fingers learn to connect more directly to your eyes and brain, = your ears may turn into a big asset. One of the best things my first organ = teacher ever said to me is to listen to what I am playing. I like to challenge = myself by ear-learning short pieces of music that I don't have the printed music = to and seeing how closely I can replicate the recording I have been working = from. (that mostly applies to thearte organ stuff, but on occasion having a well =   developed ear and music memory has served me well at church alao.).   Rick in VA  
(back) Subject: Re: "Rockingham" in Mendelssohn 6 last mov't From: <Georgewbayley@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 10:16:40 EDT   18 September 2004   Pipechatters!   Here's another musical coincidence. This one is in the "Psalm Prelude No. = 1" from Set 1 by Herbert Howells. At the top of the second page, and = elsewhere, you will find "Dite Moi" (spelling?) in the left hand part. Apparently, = Richard Rodgers must have nicked that for "South Pacific". Though I have played = that piece for many years, I didn't notice it until one of my singers, who is a =   retired Broadway actress, called it to my attention.   Enjoy!   George  
(back) Subject: Briston Organworks instrument From: <RVScara@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 10:23:21 EDT   anyone in the group played or heard a Britson instrument. Am considering = a 3-manual one for home. Can e-mail privately if preferable. It's a Washington State company and I'm on the East Coast. Thanks for any info.  
(back) Subject: Re: Briston Organworks instrument From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 10:30:42 -0400   On 9/18/04 10:23 AM, "RVScara@aol.com" <RVScara@aol.com> wrote:   > anyone in the group played or heard a Britson instrument. Am considering= a > 3-manual one for home. Can e-mail privately if preferable. It's a Washi= ngton > State company and I'm on the East Coast. Thanks for any info. >=20   I=B9ve forwarded your post to a guy who knows them quite well, I think. He=B9s in Hurricane Country right now, so it may be a day or two before you hear from him.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Briston Organworks instrument From: <gdeboer@bluemarble.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 10:16:57 -0500   Britson is made by Johannus. The samples are USA     Quoting RVScara@aol.com:   > anyone in the group played or heard a Britson instrument. Am considerin= g a >=20 > 3-manual one for home. Can e-mail privately if preferable. It's a=20 > Washington State company and I'm on the East Coast. Thanks for any info= .. >=20       Re  
(back) Subject: Re: "Rockingham" in Mendelssohn 6 last mov't From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 11:39:26 EDT   okay,   so in the b minor fugue there is a quote of London Bridge is falling down.......   dale in florida  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Study From: "Andy Lawrence" <andy@ablorgans.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 14:11:52 -0500   That all sounds pretty good me. I have two suggestions at this point:   1) Find a church that will let you use them as a bit of a guinea pig and pick a hymn or two that they sing a lot, decide on a date (allow plenty of =   time), and just do it! A church with a crummy old Balwin and a volunteer organist who isn't really an organist might be a good place to start. = There comes a point where you have to just do it. Make sure you can play it really slowly, as well as fast, that you can start at any measure, that = your fingering is consistent. Practice dropping out a part and bringing it = back in (not the melody though... keep that). Then, ask if you can accompany = the choir on that hymn during a choir practice. If that goes well, you're = ready to accompany the congregation. More likely, it won't go so well, but = you'll know what you need to work on, and then try it again. As far as getting = the tempo up, I suggest again my metronome technique of playing at the speed where you can be accurate (this might be really slow) and speed up the metronome in tiny increments, never exceeding what you can do accurately. =   You'll probably reach a point where you are messing up all the time and = will have to slow way back down again. Don't worry, the speed will come faster =   the second time. I say all this because I realized once I started playing =   regularly in church that one can spend years practicing alone and make no more progress than 6 months of playing in front of people.   2) Have a teacher check you on technique and work with you on this if needed. It may be that all you need is occasional help. This is what I do. I was taking lessons for a while but since its just a hobby for me I couldn't really prepare the way a music major would, and I and the teacher =   would both feel like I was wasting money. So now I just get a lesson = every once in a while to get new ideas for pieces to learn, to check on = technique, to try to get past plateaus, etc.   Andy       On Sat, 18 Sep 2004 06:26:50 -0700 (PDT), Nathan Smith wrote > Hi List, > > Thanks for the many encouraging responses! I look forward to > finding a teacher and digging in - I'll let you know how it goes. > > For now, I like to practice Hymns daily. So far, most of my > practice has been done at home on the keyboard, although I do have > daily access to a bunch of organs. My practice thus far has been to > pick out random Hymns that I either have never seen or have > forgotten, and play them. I will generally read through them once, > warts and all, and then play them through one more time. After 2 > times I generally flip to another one. Although my speed is not > acceptable I do see an improvement since I started really going for > it. I like to read all four parts and play them all with my hands. > If I just play the SAT parts I can cruise pretty fast. I read Hymns > out of the 1940, 1982, and Worship His Majesty (Baptist) Hymnals. > My biggest battle has been fighting my ear, but I have learned to > ignore the perfect pitch and just read. Does any of this sound > dangerous to you? > > Once in a while I will take on a Choral Prelude out of my Edwin Arthur > Kraft book. So far, I legitimately read and learned Herzlich Thut Mich > Verlangen, although I have it memorized now. Right now I am > starting Erbarm Dich Mein, o Herre Gott, and I'll probably do In > Dulci Jubilo after that. What do you think?     A.B.Lawrence Pipe Organ Service PO Box 111 Burlington, VT 05402 (802)578-3936 Visit our website at www.ablorgans.com  
(back) Subject: Unusual Complaint!! From: <Georgewbayley@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 15:33:22 EDT   18 September 2004   Dear Listers.   Here's a new one for you. No, the organ isn't too loud nor are the hymns = too fast or too slow. The music complaint of the last several months is this. = "THE CHOIR IS TOO BIG" You see, the choir area which seats 21, is too small for =   our choir which in four years has grown from 12 to 34. We have had the = audacity to occupy two additional pews and we have taken away the seat one = parishioner and her husband have sat in for the last 50 years. They have gotten some = of their friends to write complaints to the vestry. Some people are never = happy.   Don't be mistaken, my church is a wonderful place to be. The financial support of the music program as it has developed over the last four years, = has been very generous.   Enjoy the "news".   George  
(back) Subject: Re: Unusual Complaint!! From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 14:44:19 -0500   At 02:33 PM 9/18/2004, you wrote: >18 September 2004 > >Dear Listers. > > We have had the audacity to occupy two additional pews   We, unfortunately, do not have designated seating for the choir and when the choir sings (which is about twice a month...although many of wish it more often) we take up the whole\ section on one side. Some of the choir members opt to sit with family and since we have bright red robes, they are quite noticeable seated in the general congregation. This does not seem to be a problem, although there are a few traditionalists who would prefer that the choir all sit together. On a positive note, they = love to sing and make good music together.     jch      
(back) Subject: Re: Unusual Complaint!! From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 13:54:19 -0700   Don't laugh. I was FIRED from one job for filling the choir stalls when there'd been no choir for YEARS. They wanted to vest and walk in procession and sit in the stalls, but they didn't want to PRACTICE or SING anything, and the rector wouldn't allow THAT; so I organized a REAL choir. The next year, they packed the Vestry and got RID of me (!).   One of the other charges laid against me was that I filled the church with "outsiders" in the congregation for Evensong and evening Masses on Holy Days.   And people wonder why I'm glad to be retired ...   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: Re: Unusual Complaint!! From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 17:35:31 -0400   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Unusual Complaint!! From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 18:19:53 -0400   On 9/18/04 5:35 PM, "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> wrote:   > the boss in charge (read that as clergy -- in a denomination where the > clergy's word is law) wouldn't stand for it. The director was ordered to > reduce the size of the choir dramatically. It wasn't long after that the > director was deemed replaceable, marking the end >=20 > While it=B9s believable, it=B9s unbelievable. It=B9s not hard to figure out th= e > pastor=B9s REAL reasons (=B2diminution of star-power=B2); but I=B9m curious to kn= ow > what PHONY reasons he might have had to offer. >=20 > Alan >=20    
(back) Subject: Re: Unusual Complaint!! From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sun, 19 Sep 2004 06:21:52 +0800   Well, Bud, I'm sure you're a nice enough guy, but we can't have you going a= ll willy-nilly and brining people into the church. Its all about downsizing= and outsourcing don't ya know.   > One of the other charges laid against me was that I filled the church=20 > with "outsiders" in the congregation for Evensong and evening Masses on= =20 > Holy Days. >=20 > And people wonder why I'm glad to be retired ... >=20 > Cheers, >=20 > Bud   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm   Re  
(back) Subject: RE: Unusual Complaint!! From: <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 18:28:31 -0400   In the ever so bold attempt to be accommodating...   is it possible for said parishioner and husband to remain in their seat, = and the choir work around them?   Just my idea.   Neil by the Beautiful and Misty Bay  
(back) Subject: Unusual Complaint vs. Unusually Compliant From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 18:36:43 EDT   I'm trying to figure out something here. On the different organ chat lists, from time to time, we hear about a = new rector, pastor, or choir directrix who, with one wave of their wand, = destroys a century-old tradition of music overnight. The Anglican anthem tradition = is suddenly gone, and Parry is replaced by "Jesus is Really Good." The Motet Choir and Schola Cantorum are ostracised, the organist fired, and the new "ministry" of music consists of ditties of praise from "the purple book," = or some such officially issued publication. I understand that most Americans are lemmings, but does NOBODY object? =   Doesn't ANYBODY say, "I'm switching churches," or write a letter to the = vestry or trustees announcing an official end to their financial support for the church? Do they all just continue to go every Sunday, even though it is = not the church they joined, or want, or thrive in any more? In more civilized cultures and in more enlightened times, despotic dictators and illegally propped up politicians were dragged from their = palaces, sliced to bits, and their corpses set afire in the public square. Of = course, there hasn't been any kind of revolution in American in centuries. In the = mid-19th century, we slaughtered EACH OTHER fighting a war because the lower half = of the country felt it was their right to own other human beings, but nobody = seems to fight for their rights any more. Americans just seem to want to be = trampled. So I truly wonder, why are all of these congregants so passive and acquiescent when their worship service is gutted of its soul and beauty? = What makes them sit there, accept it, endure it, and continue to act as if there is nothing wrong? The clergy, like some politicos, may be under the delusion = that they have God-given powers, but they don't. Their power is in the hands of the people.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: horror stories From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 15:40:40 -0700   What IS it with these horror stories? I myself have enough to write a book. It seems, though, that they've increased in recent years, and/or the Guild has finally put some teeth into their investigations and sanctions.   It would SEEM from viewing the notices in TAO that MOST of the complaints filed are against RC and Episcopal churches ... I guess that stands to reason ... proportionately, RCs and Episcopalians have more full-time jobs to offer ... a part-time organist with a day job is more likely to just move on and not file a complaint.   I never had that many problems with RC *or* Episcopal churches, I guess because I played in conservative ones, by choice. The liturgy was fixed, as were the slots to be filled with music; I was given a budget, and told to "go do the music."   In my favorite job, Old St. Mary's RC in Cincinnati, I had lunch with the Pastor twice a year ... sometime in the summer after Corpus Christi, and again between Christmas and New Year's. Each time I presented him with the proposed music list for six months, along with the cost. If the cost of anything exceeded the music budget, we simply had a second collection at the Latin Solemn Mass. Other than that, I saw him at the altar on Sundays.   In recent years, micro-managing on the part of the clergy seems to have reared its ugly head; as I've gotten older, I've also noted that younger priests seemed to be threatened somehow by having an older professional on staff.   There was one nationally-publicized case recently where the BISHOP felt the organist was "too powerful" (read "popular"), and the bishop was (supposedly) having difficulty finding priests who were willing to be proposed as rector. I didn't know the organist in question personally, but from all reports he was gentle and unassuming.   I remember the rector at my last post FUMING when we first established the Solemn Mass and the solemn Holy Week rites with deacon and sub-deacon ... he said,   "*I* don't have anything to DO!"   I think that comment was very telling. Of course, he was young enough that he DIDN'T know the tradition ... the choir DOES basically have the lion's share of the audible parts of the liturgy in a traditional Solemn Mass. He also wouldn't allow the Gregorian propers or choral settings of the Ordinary because HE "had to wait too long for the choir to get finished."   Alas, poor music! Alas, poor ceremonies!       Bud, retired, and glad of it            
(back) Subject: Re: Unusual Complaint!! From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 19:13:51 -0400   On 9/18/04 6:28 PM, "Innkawgneeto@cs.com" <Innkawgneeto@cs.com> wrote:   > In the ever so bold attempt to be accommodating... > > is it possible for said parishioner and husband to remain in their seat, = and > the choir work around them? > What a beautiful and simple solution!   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Unusual Complaint vs. Unusually Compliant From: <Georgewbayley@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 19:21:40 EDT   18 September 2004   Sebastian, you are well spoken. When I arrived at St. Peter's in Lewes four=20 years ago last May, the Rector put away the supplemental red book.   One of the reasons St. Peter's Choir has grown so dramatically is that it=20 embraces the great Anglican Choral tradition. In the course of a few months,= you=20 will hear S. S. Wesley, Parry, Elgar, Stanford, Wood, Howells, Britten,=20 Vaughan Williams and others of the period. You also will hear Mathias, Rutte= r,=20 Howard Goodall, Duke Ellington, John Tavener, Malcolm Archer, Philip Moore,=20= John=20 Shephard, Grayston Ives, and George Bayley. You also will hear Byrd, Tallis,= =20 Tomkins, and Batten.   One choir member come from as far as 25 miles away to sing this music. Three= =20 more come from 20 miles away, and six from more than 15 miles away.   There are a many members of the congregation who give to the organist's=20 discretionary fund to make it possible to bring England Cathedral organists=20= to=20 spend a few days in residence to work with the choir and prepare them for sp= ecial=20 services. To date, we have had Philip Moore and Barry Rose. Next month, we=20 will have David Flood from Canterbury.   We have a schedule of 17 special music events for this year including a=20 performance of Marcel Dupr=E9's "The Stations of the Cross" with narration a= nd a=20 power point presentation of the paintings that inspired the poetry. Anyone w= ho=20 wants a copy of the schedule may Email me privately and I will send it as an= =20 attachment in MS Word.   To get back to you Sebastian, the Anglican Choral tradition still works. The= =20 music just needs to be sung well.   Best wishes to all,   George  
(back) Subject: Re: Unusual Complaint vs. Unusually Compliant From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 19:23:09 -0400   On 9/18/04 6:36 PM, "TubaMagna@aol.com" <TubaMagna@aol.com> wrote:   > does NOBODY object? Doesn't ANYBODY say, "I'm switching churches," or = write a > letter to the vestry or trustees announcing an official end to their = financial > support for the church? Do they all just continue to go every Sunday, = even > though it is not the church they joined, or want, or thrive in any more?   Seb, you're making me think, and I'd really rather not.   I don't THINK it's going to happen, but it's not out of the question. There's Grace & St. Paul's a bit farther uptown. You know them.   For now, I'll stay and fight, if it comes to that.   Thanks a bunch, man.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Unusual Complaint!! From: <Georgewbayley@aol.com> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 19:27:41 EDT   The beautiful solution will not work in this case as the two people to = whom I have referred, have been chronic complainers for many years. They are complaining bitterly over the new console that has been ordered The = solution is going to be a simple reconfiguring of the front of the church immediately after = the New Year. At the same time, the new console is to be installed along with = the addition of a Choir-Solo division.   The funding of the console and additions was a piece of cake, A letter = went out to the congregation in mid July and all the money plus extra was in = hand within eight weeks.   G.  
(back) Subject: irremoveable rectors From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sat, 18 Sep 2004 17:07:10 -0700   In the American Episcopal Church (at least), a sitting rector is virtually IMPOSSIBLE to remove, except for financial or sexual = shenanigans.   The next-to-last rector of the first parish I worked for in California, All Saints' on 6th Ave in San Diego, ran the place down from the 1100 communicants it had when I was there in the 1970s to less than 200 by the 1990s, and virtually bankrupted the place in the process, but he had the backing of the Vestry, and it wasn't until it appeared that they might have to close their doors that said rector left ... OF HIS OWN ACCORD.   And no, the neighborhood DIDN'T change ... if anything, it was gentrified.   Of course, you-know-WHO gentrified it, and said rector was a member of the American Anglican Retentive Council, Backward In Faith, Stand and Whine, Keep 'Em OUT, Flat-Earth Society, etc. etc. etc., and had fired his organist of 18 years for being one of "those" because she wore a pants-suit to choir practice (!) ... she won enough in THAT lawsuit to buy herself a nice 3 br house in Mission Hills with a pool (chuckle).   So he naturally wasn't going to draw any congregation from the neighborhood, despite being the historic flagship anglo-catholic church of San Diego.   Parish after parish has had to pay out HUGE settlements to buy out rectors' contracts. I often wonder why musicians don't have similar "golden parachutes" ... nor do I know the canon law that mandates/permits this, but it is so.   It cost Christ Church, Coronado Island CA over $200K to get rid of a rector.   A departing rector at St. Stephen's Church, Beaumont CA left them virtually penniless after they settled with him.   American Episcopal priests have FAR more power than they should ... despite multiple attempts at multiple General Conventions, the "Rector's Pleasure" canon is still firmly in place ... when a new rector arrives, everyone on staff is required to submit a pro forma resignation. He then has the choice of accepting them, or not. And in some cases, he does ... ACROSS THE BOARD!   Anglo-catholics in particular have a horror of "giving scandal" ... they won't fight a priest, at least not publicly. They'll leave and start another parish first.   Cheers,   Bud