PipeChat Digest #4779 - Monday, September 20, 2004
 
Grosser Gott - Organ Settings ? ? ?
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Grosser Gott
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: New Hymn
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Organ and...?
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Organ and...?
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Organ and...?
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: church bells
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Grosser Gott - Organ Settings ? ? ? From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 00:22:39 EDT   Who are some composers/arrangers who've given "treatment" to this famous, historic, CCM hymn-tune? What are some favorite arrangements/publishers/collection titles, etc.? Please share so that a = list can be compiled.   A few years ago, the Greater Kansas City Chapter, AGO, commissioned = composer (Dr.) Wilbur Held for a set of variations on Grosser Gott, subsequently published by MorningStar Publishers. Excellent writing! Effective = worship music.   Many thanks!   Dale G. Rider Independence, MO USA  
(back) Subject: Grosser Gott From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sun, 19 Sep 2004 23:56:45 -0500   Randy asked: How do you mean C? I've not been following CCM. Did some = CCM band record it?     Yes, Randy, that's EXACTLY what I mean!! Don't ask me who--but about five years ago I occasionally listened to a CCM radio station when I was in the car, and several times I heard Grosser Gott performed, IIRC, by a female vocalist. Rather reminded me of the style of early Amy Grant (not the voice). Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: New Hymn From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 00:22:18 -0500   It's a hymn my choir balks at because they sang it TO DEATH as kids along with Praise to the Lord, and one of the few my mom, a total Traditionalist, actually likes. Alicia Zeilenga Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"     -----Original Message----- From: Liquescent <quilisma@cox.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Sun, 19 Sep 2004 11:58:04 -0700 Subject: Re: New Hymn   > Many RC churches used to have nightly novena (prayer) services, which > always closed with Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament (blessing of > the > people with the consecrated Communion bread). "Holy God" was the > invariable closing hymn at Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament. > > Those services reached the height of their popularity during WWII ... > the Shrine of the Little Flower in Royal Oak, MI (home of the mighty > Kilgen) used to broadcast them over the radio. > > Part of the services' popularity was due to the fact that they were in > ENGLISH at a time when Mass was in Latin. > > Actually, between the St. Basil Hymnal and the St. Gregory Hymnal, > pre-Vatican-II Roman Catholics DID have a modest repertoire of hymns. > The liturgical deformers (sic) turned up their noses at them > (particularly at St. Basil, which was, of course, the most well-known > and loved). Healy Willan (!) was the musical editor; the hymns in St. > Basil are no better or worse than some of the best-loved Victorian > Anglican favorites; they're CERTAINLY better than "ToolanBread" and > "Turkey Buzzards" (grin). > > St. Gregory was really more of a choir book ... old RC organists and > school nuns will remember the battle between the two, which accounts > for > a lot of Montani's bitchy footnotes in St. Gregory (grin). The St. > Gregory Guild's "White List" attempted to ban virtually everything in > St. Basil's Hymnal, but nobody paid any attention (chuckle). > > St. Gregory DID have some good stuff in it that wasn't generally > available elsewhere: the Michael Haydn Tenebrae Responsories, and the > Schubert Palm Sunday music. But in general it was over-edited and the > pages were cluttered; St. Basil's pages are far cleaner, and > better-engraved, even though the book is older. I don't doubt that Dr. > Willan had a lot to do with THAT (grin). > > Cheers, > > Bud      
(back) Subject: Organ and...? From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 00:33:31 -0500   Hi everyone!   Does anyone have any ideas where I could find music that I can use with any/all of the following instruments and a toaster? I have a clarinet, trombone, percussion, flute, and possibly trumpet and guitar.   Thanks!   Alicia Zeilenga Dean AGO@UI "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis"      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and...? From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 01:53:34 -0400   I have never in my 40+ years of playing seen anything scored for Clarinet, Trombone, Percussion, Flute and TOASTER....or Trumpet & Guitar & TOASTER.   If you're referring to an electronic or digital pipe organ substitute -- please be specific... the last toaster I used made wonderful slightly = dried out English Muffins and Bagels but not music.   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOUploads/ ----- Original Message ----- From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, September 20, 2004 1:33 AM Subject: Organ and...?     > Hi everyone! > > Does anyone have any ideas where I could find music that I can use with > any/all of the following instruments and a toaster? I have a clarinet, > trombone, percussion, flute, and possibly trumpet and guitar. > > Thanks! > > Alicia Zeilenga > Dean AGO@UI > "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis" > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and...? From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Sun, 19 Sep 2004 23:40:31 -0700   Look at free hymn accompaniments ... a trombone can sub for an organ tuba for counter-melodies in the tenor range.   A clarinet can play a lot of soprano canti fermi in baroque chorale preludes, unless they're highly ornamented or go too high; you just have to write out the transposed part.   Also look at the Bach "Christ lag in Todesbanden" trio in the misc. chorale preludes ... the one with the c.f. in the ALTO ... that would work well too.   I've never tried it, but what about having the trombone play the tenor c.f. in some of the Couperin Plein Jeu movements?   If your flute and your guitar are GOOD, there are a zillion baroque flute/lute-clavichord things ... look at Telemann's stuff ...   If your guitarist can IMPROVISE, soft guitar arpeggios make a LOVELY accompaniment for chant ... I first heard that at Compline at Mt. Saviour Benedictine Abbey in Elmira, NY, and it was absolutely captivating. Even just rolled chords on the ictus work ... I used to do that with the psalm-tone propers for the youth choir at All Saints'.   In a lot of hymns, you can make a flute descant by just putting the tenor part up TWO octaves.   Solo trumpet and organ: Robert King Music Co. (online), or give the trumpet the hymn-melody while you play a free accompaniment.   Depends on what KIND of percussion ... tambors and triangles and stuff like that can be used with things like the Quempas Carol at = Christmas-time.   I'm in the process of arranging the Christmas Gospel to a German medieval tune, for three soloists, choir, triangle, six handbells, tenor drum, and organ. You're welcome to that when it's finished.   Cheers,   Bud       Alicia Zeilenga wrote:   > Hi everyone! > > Does anyone have any ideas where I could find music that I can use with > any/all of the following instruments and a toaster? I have a clarinet, =   > trombone, percussion, flute, and possibly trumpet and guitar. > > Thanks! > > Alicia Zeilenga > Dean AGO@UI > "Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis" > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: church bells From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 09:37:37 +0100   Bells, ah; now this really is a subject close to my heart, being a = recently converted bell-ringer (all of six year now) - but to English = Change-Ringing Methods.   What a humbling experience for one accustomed to multiple keyboards and pedalboard - to be given a single note to play - and then finding that I couldn't get it right !   Yet this musical experience has .. re-introduced me to working from memory =   (you do not 'read' what you are playing, but memorise how you go about changing places .. made new friendships (sitting on a bench can often segregate us from those for whom we play) .. revived our village pride in = a peal of bells for which we have been famous since 1674 .. allowed me to = have instant access to a group of similarly-minded people where-ever I go in = the country (it is positively anticipated that you will come and ring when you =   are staying away-from-home - fancy walking into someone's choir and saying =   "Hello, I'll be joining in with you tonight !").   So; ringing is making music, moderate physical exercise (sometimes 45 mins =   to 2 hrs without stopping), has the same mental stimulation as composing a =   fugue, and ..... it is a hobby for which I can be paid! Albeit a mere =A310 for ringing 30 mins before a wedding, sitting the = service out, and ringing 30 mins afterwards. As we often say, where can you get 8 plumbers (lawyers/proctologists/etc) together for 2hrs on a Saturday for = =A310 each ?   I also know what is going on in the towers of churches where I play, and what those crowds of complete strangers propose doing (ringers are often 'drafted-in' to fill vacancies during holiday periods, so brides can be listening to ringers who have nothing to do with the church in which they are being married). Indeed, some ringers are agnostic, and only enter the church in order to ring the bells that are hung there. Still, once they're =   there ....   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a multi-talented musicman]   >> Church bells are pretty non-existent in polyglot California, due to >> noise abatement ordinances ... I think it's kinda sad.   Yeah; real sad. Fancy living in a place which bans music by law. Just shouldn't be allowed. How about organising a revolution .... like they did in Boston ?