PipeChat Digest #4780 - Monday, September 20, 2004
 
Re: new Hymn
  by "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at>
Re: Grosser Gott - Organ Settings?
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: Organ and...?
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Organ and...?
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: Organ and...?
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Te deum laudamus / Grosser Gott
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: New Hymn
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Organs, hurricanes, etc
  by "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net>
Re: Organ and...?
  by "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net>
Re: Bells in Manhattan (was New Hymn)
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Toaster Music
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Anglican Orphans Of The Storm (AOOT)
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
writer for preface/foreword
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
NIGHT OF MIRACLES -- SATB Scores Sought [off-topic]
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Bells in Manhattan (was New Hymn)
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
O Salutaris
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
From Glenda
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: O Salutaris
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
Re: Organ and...?
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: O Salutaris
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Corpus Christi hymns
  by "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: new Hymn From: "Thomas Mohr" <thomasmohr@aon.at> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 11:51:43 +0200   Actually "Grosser Gott" was written by Ignaz Franz (1719-1790, Text) and = Peter Ritter (1770-1847, Melody) and is originally a German poem based on the = "Te Deum".   It was published in 1799 in Vienna (that was well after Empress Mary = Therese) and was immensely popular in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Even today it is =   regular part of solemn events, especially for the Procession on the = occasion of "Corpus Christi".           -- DI Thomas Mohr Institute for Cancer Research Medical University of Vienna Borschkegasse 8a A-1090 Vienna   ++43 1 4277 65160  
(back) Subject: Re: Grosser Gott - Organ Settings? From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 06:10:53 -0400   Dale Rider asked "Who are some composers/arrangers who've given = "treatment" to this famous, historic, CCM hymn-tune? What are some favorite arrangements/publishers/collection titles, etc.? Please share so that a list can be compiled."   Kevin Hildebrand has one I recall as being very simple to play. It's in a four-volume set published by Concordia although I couldn't find it listed = on their web site just now.    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and...? From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 07:19:49 EDT   >Does anyone have any ideas where I could find music that I can use with >any/all of the following instruments and a toaster? I have a clarinet, =   >trombone, percussion, flute, and possibly trumpet and guitar.   Go to your local music store and ask for advice. There are literally = TONS of books of arrangements of classics for weddings written for organ and = flute and organ and trumpet, not to mention works written for piano/harpsichord = and flute that adapt well. There are some CD's of organ and percussion that have been released, so check them out and see if anything might be to your = liking. You didn't mention what type of percussion you had...was it a = tambourine or orchestra bells or a snare drum or a drum set or ??? Percussion is a rather wide term, be more specific. The same applies for Clarinet and = Trombone, there are some classical movements from sonatas that would work well = adapted to organ from piano, just find one that can work on the organ. It all depends on how good of a player your instrumentalist is and how well of = an arranger you are. Why not arrange something yourself? Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and...? From: "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 08:10:25 -0500   For clarinet, I really enjoy the Rheinberger op. 150 6 Stuecke. It's originally for violin and organ, but with a few octave transpositions, the clarinet takes it very well.   I did a workshop for instruments with small organs last summer at the AGO Region I convention. I was playing a 1/3 Bedient, and part of the demo was taking two-manual organ music and playing the solo lines on various instruments. We did sections of Mendelssohn, Couperin, Bach, and various other composers, with an assortment of instruments taking the solo lines that would ordinarily be on the second manual (or the pedal, for the Bach "Wer nur der lieben Gott lasst walten" from the Schubler chorales. It's amazing how well things can work- look through your organ music and find a few things with the right ranges. I'm sure you already know some pieces that will work! This can even let you play things that are a bit too hard if you have to play all the parts- foist one off on your soloist.   Paul     http://www.sover.net/~popel/agomain.html      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and...? From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 10:10:09 -0400   > Does anyone have any ideas where I could find music that I can use with > any/all of the following instruments and a toaster? I have a clarinet, > trombone, percussion, flute, and possibly trumpet and guitar.   The standard on any such inquiry is the AGO publication _Organ Plus_. Every organist should own this valuable resource.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Te deum laudamus / Grosser Gott From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 11:01:36 -0400   On 9/19/04 8:03 PM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > Can you elaborate a bit on Maria Teresa? You mean she actually promoted = this > hymn? =20   Not very much. The story, as I have it from the Hymnal Companion to the Lutheran Book of Worship:   [Tune (also called Te Deum) is anonymous] appeared with the German text in the Katholisches Gesangbuch as given below:   [Then it=B9s printed out in 6/8 time; it=B9s recognizable, but not what I=B9m familiar with, exactly.]   Many variants of the melody appeared during the first half of the nineteent= h century, a full history of which can be found in Baumker.* III, 285-287. Another form of the tune, =B3Hursley,=B2 is given at LBW 270.   The German versification of the Te Deum laudamus [LBW 3] by an unknown author appeared in the Katholisches Gesangbuch published in Vienna in 1744 at the request of the Austrian empress, Maria Theresa (1717-1780). Described by one historian as =B3the most human of the Habsburgs,=B2 Maria Theresa was a devout Roman Catholic, and a key political figure in eighteenth-century Europe.     *See also William Baumker, =B3Das Katholische Deutsche Kirkenlied in seinen Singweisen.=B2 Reprint of the 1883-1911 edition. Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlag Buchhandlung, 1962.     Alan (OK, apparently not =B3promoted,=B2 but =B3requested=B2)  
(back) Subject: Re: New Hymn From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 11:42:35 -0400   On 9/19/04 8:03 PM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > They let that RC church play _electronic_ bells in Manhattan? Quelle hor= reur! > Doesn't someone complain? >=20 Well, in this specific case, it=B9s a block from my house in The very residential Bronx. I know only one person=B9s response (that of a secular Jew), who says, =B3I love it. Makes me think I=B9m in a small English village. One day I=B9m going donate a $20 bill to them.=B2 (He=B9s an Anglophile, WASP wannabe, who attends MY [Manhattan] church fairly often for [he says] =B3good preaching and good music.=B2)   But bells in Manhattan? Oh, of course. Maybe there ARE complaints, but they amount to nothing. Or are you speaking of the =B3electronic=B2 aspect? Well, that too, I=B9m sure. Real ones in the large historic churches; electronics in the smaller places. (Frankly, I don=B9t think I can tell the difference, unless I hear several octaves of bells from a steeple that probably wouldn=B9t hold two real ones.)   Alan =20    
(back) Subject: Organs, hurricanes, etc From: "rgunther@cantv.net" <rgunther@cantv.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 11:43:04 -0400   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and...? From: "noel jones" <gedeckt@usit.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 11:52:22 -0400     >Thanks! > >Alicia Zeilenga >Dean AGO@UI >"Santa Caecilia, ora pro nobis" > > > No, Tom and List, Alicia knows, as Dean of an AGO Chapter, that St. Cecilia Is the Patron Saint of Toasters. She just became a Saint long before her time. And back then they only had pipe organs. A lousy substitute for a toaster, but hey...that's all they had.   Every morning nuns the world around got on their knees and prayed to Saint Cecilia for the invention of the toaster. But sadly, each morning they were greeted at the refectory table with bread, plain, untoasted. THey went about their days with their fervent prayers unanswered.   In fact, Peter Schickele, renowned scholar of things arcane, has possibly attributed the Spanish Inquisition to a hunt for the real = toaster.   For a short while, the invention of the reed organ brought hope to these nuns, but to no avail. It did nothing for bread.   Finally a real toaster was invented. As a result it brought about Vatican II, which then emptied the convents.         --   noel jones, aago noeljones@frogmusic.com ----------------------------------- 1 877 249-5251 Athens, TN USA   www.frogmusic.com Rodgers Organ Users Group Frog Music Press - Organ and MIDI Music FMP Organ Music Search Service Rodgers Organ Design & Voicing Services    
(back) Subject: Re: Bells in Manhattan (was New Hymn) From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 10:00:00 -0600   Alan,   When living in NY, I used to always hear the bells in Brooklyn churches at noon and perhaps at 5 PM. When visiting my mom in Bay Ridge, you can still hear them. Never even THOUGHT that someone would complain!!! They're a pleasant relief to the sirens and 4 AM garbage trucks.   David E   On 09/20/04 at 3:42 PM you wrote: On 9/19/04 8:03 PM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:     But bells in Manhattan? Oh, of course. Maybe there ARE complaints, but they amount to nothing.     David E   David Evangelides Fulfillment Manager International Bible Society 719-867-2729 (Sent by wireless T-Mobile Sidekick)  
(back) Subject: Toaster Music From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 11:04:36 -0500   Hey, if Leroy Anderson can write music for the typewriter, surely we can have some toaster music! I'm thinking of a "Breakfast Suite" featuring toaster, percolator, frying liver ("organ" music, see!), and perhaps = flute. ;>)   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Anglican Orphans Of The Storm (AOOT) From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 09:08:30 -0700   I have created Anglican Orphans Of The Storm (AOOTS) on Yahoo for us to use as an alternative to Anglican-Music until somebody figures out what's up with stsams.org.   To join, go to:   http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AOOTS   Anglican-Music-Off-Topic on Yahoo remains active, and remains the appropriate place for discussion of NON-musical subjects (grin).   Please pass the word ... I don't have everybody in my address book.   Cheers,   Bud        
(back) Subject: writer for preface/foreword From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 11:13:06 -0500   Two fantasias for organ of mine are scheduled for publication by Paraclete Press in January 2005, and the editors would like a foreword that would be helpful to the potential purchaser. In addition, I should think excerpts might be used in advertising/marketing. I could and may well end up doing this, but I thought it might be informative for me to see if there is someone on one of these lists with a totally fresh, objective outlook who would want to take this on. It would be helpful if such a person were = known in academic and/or recital circles. I can't promise remuneration, but your name would be in print and you'd certainly get a complimentary copy (or more) of the finished product.   The first of the two fantasias is in c minor and is inspired by Bach's BWV 537 fantasia in the same key. I sent a few copies out to people when I = first wrote it over a year ago but have subsequently made changes and tightened = it up.   The second piece is in d minor and is couched in a Romantic Hindemithian mode. Rhapsodic sections give way to fugal writing, and these two = procedures propel the work to its conclusion.   Both pieces can be used in recital. The c minor would work as a prelude in church, and the d minor is fitting for a closing voluntary.   The foreword needs to be written by October 11. Please respond to me (lindr@core.com) privately if you are interested and include your surface address for me to send hard copies.   Many thanks, Robert Lind    
(back) Subject: NIGHT OF MIRACLES -- SATB Scores Sought [off-topic] From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 13:03:27 -0700   Hello, well, on the heels of the great success we had with the Dubois "Seven Last Words" this past Lent, we're going to do a cantata for Christmas at Faith Lutheran. By popular demand, I have selected "Night of Miracles" by John W. Peterson. No, it's not the greatest cantata ever written but it was an annual favorite here in Los Angeles for many years, presented annually by the now-inactive Choral Gifts. And it is beloved by many people, and it is at the right "difficulty" level for a community chorus to undertake.   The cantata is out of print and as far as I can tell unavailable --- but, as with the "Seven Last Words," if someone has copies of the SATB score that they'd be willing to lend us, that would really be terrific. If you're local to L.A., I can pick up and return the scores; if you have to ship them, the church will cover the shipping costs both ways. We'll be sure to return them promptly.   Thanks!   =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D   Night of Miracles A Christmas Cantata by John W. Peterson   Will be performed by the Greater Los Angeles Inter-Denominational Chorus at Faith Lutheran Church 3320 W. 85th Street Inglewood, California 90305 Rev. Dietrich Schleef, Pastor   Sunday, December 12 2004, 4 p.m. Directed by Charlie Lester (Organist, Pianist & Soloists TBA)   All choir or chorus members in the greater Los Angeles, Inglewood, and South L.A. areas are invited to join the Greater Los Angeles Inter-Denominational Chorus for this glorious presentation. Please feel free to share this flyer with others! Additionally, there are solos for Soprano, Alto, Tenor and Bass voices. If you have a good solo voice, we invite you to come to the soloist auditions.   Please consult the schedule below and then contact Mr. Lester if you will be able to participate. Please note that consistent and prompt attendance at rehearsals will be expected.   URGENT: We are in need of copies of the Night of Miracles vocal score (SATB). If you have your own copy and can bring it; great. If your churchs music library has copies that we can borrow and promptly return, even greater! Based on the turnout for the Dubois Seven Last Words this past Easter, we'll need about 40 copies.       REHEARSAL SCHEDULE   All rehearsals on Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Faith Lutheran  unless otherwise noted   October 10 - Soloist Auditions October 17 - First Read-through October 24 October 31   November 7 November 14 November 21 November 28   December 5 11:00 a.m. Final Music Rehearsal 12:30 p.m. Light luncheon break 2:00 p.m. Full Run-through w/ narrator   December 12 4:00 p.m. PERFORMANCE All participants will please arrive at 3 p.m.     For more information, email Charlie Lester  crl@137.com; or contact the church at 323-750-3552          
(back) Subject: Re: Bells in Manhattan (was New Hymn) From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 17:06:24 -0400   on 9/20/04 12:00 PM, David Evangelides at davide@theatreorgans.com wrote:   > Alan, >=20 > When living in NY, I used to always hear the bells in Brooklyn churches > at noon and perhaps at 5 PM. When visiting my mom in Bay Ridge, you can > still hear them. Never even THOUGHT that someone would complain!!! > They're a pleasant relief to the sirens and 4 AM garbage trucks. >=20 > David E >=20 >   Well, in this specific case, it=B9s a block from my house in The very residential Bronx. I know only one person=B9s response (that of a secular Jew), who says, =B3I love it. Makes me think I=B9m in a small English village. One day I=B9m going donate a $20 bill to them.=B2 (He=B9s an Anglophile, WASP wannabe, who attends MY [Manhattan] church fairly often for [he says] =B3good preaching and good music.=B2)   But bells in Manhattan? Oh, of course. Maybe there ARE complaints, but they amount to nothing. Or are you speaking of the =B3electronic=B2 aspect? Well, that too, I=B9m sure. Real ones in the large historic churches; electronics in the smaller places. (Frankly, I don=B9t think I can tell the difference, unless I hear several octaves of bells from a steeple that probably wouldn=B9t hold two real ones.)   Alan =20   Silly me. I forgot all about the ambient noise in NYC. How could anyone ever complain? They probably couldn't hear them in the first place! Thoug= h my question was aimed at electronic bells. The ones I've heard are immediately recognizable as fake and sound horrible.   That's a great story, Alan, about the secular Jew. Though I guess it's pretty clear that if they make him think he's in an English village, then the bells are not playing How Great Thou Art.   By the way, I'm in charge of a set of 50-some bells, four octaves or so, on the campus of Miami University, where I am a professor of French. The bell= s are real, but the keyboard is not in the sense that it is not the touch-sensitive type found on a real carillon. It plays several times a day, all music I "recorded" on a computer chip a couple of years ago (about 120 songs--Handel, Bach, Purcell, the Beatles, Gershwin, etc.). So I have the strange feeling of hearing myself play every time I pass by at those times.     Randy Runyon Music Director Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.edu      
(back) Subject: O Salutaris From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 17:23:26 -0400   Can someone tell me the appropriate season for singing O Salutaris? Our = church wants to hear Dupre's rendition & of course, we'd like it to be = liturgically correct.   Thanks,   Scot  
(back) Subject: From Glenda From: "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 17:13:37 -0500   Well, Glenda is somewhat back on-line - at least from her office. Below is a copy, somewhat edited, of what she sent me today. Based on this i doubt that she will be on IRC tonight but who knows, miracles do happen. <G> I am going to gather that we will hear from her on the list soon. I wouldn't be surprised if their satellite dish got moved during the storm.   David   ***************************************************************************= ***** Power didn't come on until mid-morning today. We were in desperate straits - toilet water was running out. I'll never look at water the same way again. Can't get out on internet at home - maybe Rick will have a look at it tonight. He's been doing 12-hour day shifts for the last week - roadblocks, check-ins on elderly, calls, directing traffic, whatever. But Mom's had water and gas (hot water!) since I took her home Friday, and her power came on Saturday night.   Contents of refrigerator/freezer were laid to rest in the new trash bin today - power was off from 7:40 Wednesday night until 10:30 or so this morning. From Friday on we've had scorcher days. The major goal of each day was finding ice and water - I'm thankful for FEMA, because NO ONE ELSE had ice. It's funny and sad to see empty shelves at Wal-Mart. The National Guard guys must find me irresistable - yesterday they gave me 9 bags of ice! Geez - I shared with all my neighbors, and felt guilty because Pensacola residents were limited to 2 bags apiece. Iced Diet Pepsi - so decadent.   Saw the photos of Pensacola and environs on the Pensacola News Journal site just now (my deposition was cancelled, and I'm the only one manning the office). I'm even more shocked - in tears. [snip] I was just at Fort Pickens a month ago - it's partially submerged.   [snip]   No word yet on the organs of P'cola and Mobile - still can't find people.   Thanks for all the news - it's bad when I have to call Arkansas to find out what's going on around me. But things all over, even in Pensacola, are getting better every day.   Glenda ***************************************************************************= *********  
(back) Subject: Re: O Salutaris From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 15:23:12 -0700   O Salutaris Hostia is the last two verses of one of the Office Hymns for the Feast of Corpus Christi, "Verbum supernum prodiens" .   Those verses were sung at Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, along with "Tantum ergo sacramentum," the last two verses of "Pange lingua gloriosi," the other Office Hymn for Corpus Christi.   It was customary to sing the two hymns in their entirety from the Feast of Corpus Christi (Thursday after Trinity Sunday) through the Sunday Within the Octave (Trinity 1) and the Octave Day (Thursday after Trinity = 1).   The procession with the Blessed Sacrament was held three times: on the Feast, on the Sunday, and on the Octave Day.   In practice, it's a general communion text, and can be sung at just about any celebration of the Eucharist.   I usually changed "our true native land" to "our true heav'nly home" when we sang it in English because most people in the US weren't familiar with the Cluniac monks' poetic image of HEAVEN as our true native land ... the silly congregations thought it was a PATRIOTIC hymn (chuckle).   Cheers,   Bud       BlueeyedBear@aol.com wrote:   > Can someone tell me the appropriate season for singing O Salutaris? > Our church wants to hear Dupre's rendition & of course, we'd like it > to be liturgically correct. > > Thanks, > > Scot > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for > pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : > http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: > <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: > <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: > <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and...? From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 19:16:22 EDT   In a message dated 9/20/04 1:38:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time, azeilenga@theatreorgans.com writes:   << Does anyone have any ideas where I could find music that I can use with =   any/all of the following instruments and a toaster? I have a clarinet, trombone, percussion, flute, and possibly trumpet and guitar. >>   How advanced are these other musicians? There could be a huge difference between a middle school student and semi-pro player. I have some pieces = for organ and WW Trio - the trombone could probably handle the bassoon part. = A good percussionist should be able to listen to the music and tastefully add a = decent percussion part (we won't even go into what a bad percussionist might do). =   Richard Spittel Baltimore. MD  
(back) Subject: Re: O Salutaris From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 19:06:05 -0500     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Monday, September 20, 2004 5:23 PM Subject: Re: O Salutaris     > O Salutaris Hostia is the last two verses of one of the Office Hymns for > the Feast of Corpus Christi, "Verbum supernum prodiens" . > > Those verses were sung at Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, along > with "Tantum ergo sacramentum," the last two verses of "Pange lingua > gloriosi," the other Office Hymn for Corpus Christi. > > It was customary to sing the two hymns in their entirety from the Feast > of Corpus Christi (Thursday after Trinity Sunday) through the Sunday > Within the Octave (Trinity 1) and the Octave Day (Thursday after Trinity 1).   This is correct. In fact the hymn was one of five that were written by = St. Thomas Aquinas for the Feast of Corpus Christi. St. Thomas was = commissioned to write them by Pope Urban IV when he first instituted the Feast of = Corpus Christi in 1264. Since, however, "O salutaris hostia" refers mostly to Christ's victory over death, its character would also be suited to the = Fifty Great Days of Easter.   John Speller      
(back) Subject: Corpus Christi hymns From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> Date: Mon, 20 Sep 2004 17:51:09 -0700   The other three, if I remember correctly, are "Sacris solemniis" (the Office Hymn for monastic Mattins), "Lauda Sion Salvatorem" (the Sequence at Mass), and "Adoro te devote" ... don't know quite where it fit into the liturgical scheme of things, but it certainly became the most popular of the five, at least in Anglican circles where Benediction wasn't the norm.   "Sacris Solemniis" is written in an odd meter and has a VERY difficult plainsong tune; however, "Panis angelicus" (the last two verses) has been extracted from it and set to music by many composers.   "Lauda Sion" is PERISHING long in its complete form; even WE transferred it to be sung during the Procession, rather than during Mass. It has all but disappeared from the repertoire, except in a handful of old-fashioned anglo-catholic churches and Tridentine RC churches.   The new (1975) Graduale Romanum allows it to be shortened considerably by beginning at the last section, "Ecce Panis Angelorum", which has also been extracted and set by a number of composers.   Cheers,   Bud   John L. Speller wrote:   > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Liquescent" <quilisma@cox.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Monday, September 20, 2004 5:23 PM > Subject: Re: O Salutaris > > > >>O Salutaris Hostia is the last two verses of one of the Office Hymns for >>the Feast of Corpus Christi, "Verbum supernum prodiens" . >> >>Those verses were sung at Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, along >>with "Tantum ergo sacramentum," the last two verses of "Pange lingua >>gloriosi," the other Office Hymn for Corpus Christi. >> >>It was customary to sing the two hymns in their entirety from the Feast >>of Corpus Christi (Thursday after Trinity Sunday) through the Sunday >>Within the Octave (Trinity 1) and the Octave Day (Thursday after Trinity > > 1). > > This is correct. In fact the hymn was one of five that were written by = St. > Thomas Aquinas for the Feast of Corpus Christi. St. Thomas was = commissioned > to write them by Pope Urban IV when he first instituted the Feast of = Corpus > Christi in 1264. Since, however, "O salutaris hostia" refers mostly to > Christ's victory over death, its character would also be suited to the = Fifty > Great Days of Easter. > > John Speller > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >