PipeChat Digest #4794 - Tuesday, September 28, 2004
 
Re: stoplist fee?
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: stoplist fee?
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: In memoriam
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: RC Skinners
  by <Seedlac@aol.com>
VIERNE/WIDOR MASSES: I SECOND THAT!  (x post)    Re: Widor and Vierne Mas
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: stoplist fee?
  by <OrganMD@aol.com>
Re: stoplist fee?   PS!
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Speaking of the Vierne Messe Solennelle!!
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: What did you play today?
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Rinck's "Rondo for a Flute stop".
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
RE: Hurricane Felix!
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Thanks; question
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Thanks; question
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: very strange EBAY sale
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Thanks; question (4' pedal solo line piece)
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: Thanks; question
  by "Don Sizemore" <dls@metalab.unc.edu>
Re: very strange EBAY sale
  by <Tspiggle@aol.com>
Kent Tritle, St. Ignatius, 9-26-04
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: stoplist fee? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 13:28:54 -0500   It seems to me that what is wrong with this picture is that people are = having to pay in order to research the history of Austin organs. It = has generally been the case in most areas of life that various fees, = including copyright fees for printed material and photographs, have = either been set much lower or waived altogether when the material is = being used for academic or nonprofit purposes. Only when the material = is used for commercial purposes are higher fees normally charged. Thus, = for example, if I were to wish to reproduce a photograph from a museum's = collection in a historical magazine article the copyright fee would = normally be set very low or waived altogether. On the other hand if I = wished to reproduce the same photograph if a Coca Cola advertisement, it = would be normal to charge much more. Most people who research pipe = organs are not going to make much, if any, money out of doing so, and = they may be discouraged from doing so altogether if they have to do so = out of their own pockets. A fee of ten dollars might be considered = reasonable to cover the expense of providing the materials, but a fee of = fifty dollars probably represents a profit margin of several hundred = percent. (Either that or they are extremely inefficient.) If Austin = are going to charge these sorts of exhorbitant fees and discourage = people who are most interested in their instruments, it is not going to = enhance their reputation.   John Speller   ----- Original Message -----=20 From: BlueeyedBear@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Tuesday, September 28, 2004 12:29 PM Subject: Re: stoplist fee?     what's wrong with this picture?
(back) Subject: Re: stoplist fee? From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:03:13 -0400   When I have used this service from Austin, I have received in excess of fifty sheets of information, apparently culled from more than just one file. I have received diagrams, correspondence, change orders, scale sheets etc. Austin calls the fee a research fee.   Remember also that an invoice must be produced, which means setting up an account for you: not usually a simple process in today's computerized world.   I would bet that it would consume a half-hour of one employees time, and fifteen minutes of another's.   If one is to remain in business today, each employee must generate 6 to 7 times his hourly rate in order for the company to remain viable. These are standard manufacturing figures - check it out!   You apparently have no concept of what it costs to run an organ company today. I do. I have run a firm for over thirty-five years, employing as many as eleven.   Fifty Bux is a bargain!   Jim       On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 13:29:18 EDT BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes: In a message dated 9/28/04 4:36:25 AM Pacific Daylight Time, mcfarland6@juno.com writes:     Digging out the stuff is only part of it. It must then be xeroxed and collated. A cover letter, invoice, and mailing envelope must then be produced. As I said, it is partly to discourage rampant requests. Minimum Billing of $50 is somewhat normal in the industry.   Most important: Making a profit is an inherent part of staying in business!     i disagree. having worked in a business where retrieving archived information can be extensive, i know that it doesn't take more than a few minutes to retrieve a couple of sheets of paper (stoplists aren't THAT long!) which should be easily searched (since i can provide the date of installation, location, city/state, and opus number), photocopied and put into an ordinary envelope. there is no need for a cover letter or invoice.   let's suppose the company got five such requests on a given day. all five should be able to be processed and put in the mail in less than an hour. at $50 a pop, the company just made $250 for less than an hour's work.   what's wrong with this picture?
(back) Subject: Re: In memoriam From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:36:30 -0600   Good Evening, Glenda:   You wrote:   > I shall miss Jackie, her missionary zeal, her common sense, her gorgeous > hats, her impeccable taste in clothes, her advice, her friendship, her > shining example - her Christianity.   From your tribute, I would have liked to know Jackie, too.   F. Richard Burt     ..      
(back) Subject: Re: RC Skinners From: <Seedlac@aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 17:45:43 EDT   There is a Skinner in the Chapel of Trinity College, NE DC It is almost directly across from the National Shrine. The wonderful large Romanesque = building cannot hide the fact that this was not one of Skinner's finest. A modest 3 = man in the balcony. A decade or so ago the poor building had two disasters. = First squirrels blocked up the rood drain and water leaked in. The second more disastrous was a steam pipe broke during a long holiday and the chapel = became a dripping wet. To my knowledge the college has not spent the $ for = restoration.  
(back) Subject: VIERNE/WIDOR MASSES: I SECOND THAT! (x post) Re: Widor and Vierne Masses From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 18:08:44 EDT   Regarding the post below, I will second his endorsement heartily. It is = one of THE finest choral and organ CDs I have ever heard anywhere from any = choir and any organist. Yes, there is a rather "French" sounding F# (out of = tune haha!) on the final note of the introduction to the Gloria in Excelsis of = the Widor Mass, but to me this adds realism. If any of you don't yet have = this CD in your collection, I cannot suggest fast enough that you add it. I know it = can be found on Amazon.com.   -Scott Foppiano, Memphis (see below...)     In a message dated 9/28/04 2:57:11 PM Central Daylight Time, alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk writes:   > A very excellent CD of Widor's Messe a deux choeurs et deux orgues. = Vierne > Messe solennelle. Plus Dupre Quatre motets. Was made by the choir of > Westminster Cathedral (London) conducted by James O'Donnell with = organists > Joseph Cullen and Andrew Reid. > > This recording was made in 1996. I can't praise it enough. It is superb. = The > wonderful choir and organs of Westminster Cathedral are heard at their = best. > > The CD is on the Hyperion label. Number CDA66898 > > Alan Taylor > London >     Scott F. Foppiano Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.  
(back) Subject: Re: stoplist fee? From: <OrganMD@aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 18:13:26 EDT   Hi ...............   As a representative of the Austin Company, I must jump into the middle of this discussion. The bottom line is as was mentioned by another member of = this list, because of the uniqueness of the Austin action and many other = aspects of an Austin organ, we do get many requests for information about old instruments.   Austin, while one of the few remaining old major American organbuilders, = has also had to streamline the shop in order to stay in business. That means = we do not have extra help around these days with nothing to do but answer the =   phone and look up old stop lists. While $50.00 may seem like a high price = it is intended to scare off the curiosity seekers and in fact it does cost some = money for the company to provide the service. (If you have ever run your own business you know just how much any employee really costs per hour. That = figure is always substantially higher than the hourly wage paid.)   We at Austin love to hear from all of you regarding our instruments, but = in order to stay in the game we have had to make some hard choices. Not = providing free archival information is one of them.   I hope that this helps to explain and defuse this issue.   Sincerely,   Bill Hesterman Regional Sales and Design Director Austin Organs, Inc.  
(back) Subject: Re: stoplist fee? PS! From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 18:17:39 -0400   PS:   No one on this list ever "won" and argument.   EVER!     At this point I will yield to the hopelessness of it all, and feel serene and unconcerned.   Remember: He who angers you, controls you !     Jim         On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 15:03:13 -0400 Jim McFarland <mcfarland6@juno.com> writes: When I have used this service from Austin, I have received in excess of fifty sheets of information, apparently culled from more than just one file. I have received diagrams, correspondence, change orders, scale sheets etc. Austin calls the fee a research fee.   Remember also that an invoice must be produced, which means setting up an account for you: not usually a simple process in today's computerized world.   I would bet that it would consume a half-hour of one employees time, and fifteen minutes of another's.   If one is to remain in business today, each employee must generate 6 to 7 times his hourly rate in order for the company to remain viable. These are standard manufacturing figures - check it out!   You apparently have no concept of what it costs to run an organ company today. I do. I have run a firm for over thirty-five years, employing as many as eleven.   Fifty Bux is a bargain!   Jim       On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 13:29:18 EDT BlueeyedBear@aol.com writes: In a message dated 9/28/04 4:36:25 AM Pacific Daylight Time, mcfarland6@juno.com writes:     Digging out the stuff is only part of it. It must then be xeroxed and collated. A cover letter, invoice, and mailing envelope must then be produced. As I said, it is partly to discourage rampant requests. Minimum Billing of $50 is somewhat normal in the industry.   Most important: Making a profit is an inherent part of staying in business!     i disagree. having worked in a business where retrieving archived information can be extensive, i know that it doesn't take more than a few minutes to retrieve a couple of sheets of paper (stoplists aren't THAT long!) which should be easily searched (since i can provide the date of installation, location, city/state, and opus number), photocopied and put into an ordinary envelope. there is no need for a cover letter or invoice.   let's suppose the company got five such requests on a given day. all five should be able to be processed and put in the mail in less than an hour. at $50 a pop, the company just made $250 for less than an hour's work.   what's wrong with this picture?                 "Being in politics is like being a football coach. You have to be smart enough to understand the game, and dumb enough to think it's important." -Eugene McCarthy
(back) Subject: Speaking of the Vierne Messe Solennelle!! From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 17:17:56 -0400   Anybody in the St. Louis area... I am playing the Vierne Messe=20 Solennelle (two organs) with the Masterworks Chorale at St. Peter's=20 Cathedral, Belleville, IL, on Sunday, October 10 at 7:30 pm. It's a=20 concert of Cathedral music. Am only playing the lowly "orgue de=20 choeur" (am new here, moved from Cincinnati this past summer), but it=20=   should be fun and good. Dennis Sparger conducts (he is also the=20 conductor of the St. Louis Bach Society chorus.) Come and say hi=20 afterward! Chuck Peery St. Louis     On Sep 28, 2004, at 6:08 PM, ScottFop@aol.com wrote:   > Regarding the post below, I will second his endorsement heartily.=A0 = It=20 > is one of THE finest choral and organ CDs I have ever heard anywhere=20=   > from any choir and any organist.=A0 Yes, there is a rather "French"=20 > sounding F# (out of tune haha!) on the final note of the introduction=20=   > to the Gloria in Excelsis of the Widor Mass, but to me this adds=20 > realism.=A0 If any of you don't yet have this CD in your collection, I=20=   > cannot suggest fast enough that you add it.=A0 I know it can be found = on=20 > Amazon.com. > > -Scott Foppiano, Memphis (see below...) > > > In a message dated 9/28/04 2:57:11 PM Central Daylight Time,=20 > alantaylor1@members.v21.co.uk writes: > > > A very excellent CD of Widor's Messe a deux choeurs et deux orgues.=20 > Vierne > Messe solennelle. Plus Dupre Quatre motets. Was made by the choir of > Westminster Cathedral (London) conducted by James O'Donnell with=20 > organists > Joseph Cullen and Andrew Reid. > > This recording was made in 1996. I can't praise it enough. It is=20 > superb. The > wonderful choir and organs of Westminster Cathedral are heard at=20 > their best. > > The CD is on the Hyperion label. Number CDA66898 > > Alan Taylor > London > > > > > Scott F. Foppiano > Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.    
(back) Subject: Re: What did you play today? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 19:27:18 -0400   On 9/28/04 12:06 AM, "OMusic@aol.com" <OMusic@aol.com> wrote:   > Pedalpoint > Offertory: For The Beauty of the Earth, arr Page   Reminds me of the old magazine advertisement: =B3Promise her anything, but give her arr Page.=B2   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Rinck's "Rondo for a Flute stop". From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 18:29:58 -0500   Stephen Best wrote:   > I have the Rinck "Rondo" as part of "Rink's Practical Organ School, > carefully revised: with the German directions and terms translated > into English and the pedal part printed on a separate staff," edited > by W.T. Best, published by Novello, date unknown.   Well, perhaps unspecified would be a better descriptor. I'm curious, though, Novello's custom in the 19th and early 20th centuries on the choral music they pulished, was to use blank parts of fascicules for printing catalog information. Very often on these catalog pages, there is a very small legend in the lower left hand corner of the page in very small type--3 to 6 point--giving the date of the catalog in day / month / year format. In the absence of such legend, it is possible to approximate a printing date by seeing what else is included in the pages.   ns  
(back) Subject: RE: Hurricane Felix! From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 18:20:21 -0500   Thanks, Mike, for that stirring account. I'm glad to hear Felix is still turning heads, and know that he is much more welcome than a Charley, Frances, Ivan or Jeanne.   From storm-tossed Florida where the downed trees around my property have yet to receive their proper requiem,   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: Thanks; question From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 18:30:57 -0500   Thanks for your responses. My friend was murdered by an ex-convict she had befriended and finally had to evict from a rental property. He broke into her house and stabbed her to death in her sleep. She received multiple wounds in the head and chest.   It has just this minute hit me that she is gone. I have made it all this time not believing it to be true, and could function quite well, even talking with the family and my mentor. But now that the service is over, and I've tried unsuccessfully to practice after work, I'm crying and guzzling beer. I hate falling apart - it's so uncivilized. It was hard all those years to be a criminal defense attorney and believe in the death penalty too. Right this minute I would welcome a small lynching party.   Enough of that. Can you give me other examples of charming pieces where the pedal part sings along (maybe the melody or maybe not) on a 4' stop? I can off the top of my head think of Bach's "Nun freut euch . . ." and the "Lobe de Herren" sound-alike, Vaughan-Williams' Prelude on Song 13 and Krebs' "Wachet auf". Are there others that I might look at?   Thanks (it took 4 tries to spell that one).   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com            
(back) Subject: Re: Thanks; question From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 19:56:38 EDT   In a message dated 9/28/04 4:45:10 PM Pacific Daylight Time, gksjd85@direcway.com writes:   > Enough of that. Can you give me other examples of charming pieces where > the pedal part sings along (maybe the melody or maybe not) on a 4' stop? > I can off the top of my head think of Bach's "Nun freut euch . . ." and > the "Lobe de Herren" sound-alike, Vaughan-Williams' Prelude on Song 13 > and Krebs' "Wachet auf". Are there others that I might look at?   glenda, will you have an assistant for stop-changes? if so, how about = searle wright's "brother james' air"?   and a couple that don't have a singing pedal part, but are still charming = on a small instrument:   teddy dubois - "in paradisum" percy fletcher - "fountain reverie"   scot  
(back) Subject: Re: very strange EBAY sale From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:00:38 EDT   If it was a gift to the Manhattan School, which I believe it purports to = be, why is it for sale at all?  
(back) Subject: Re: Thanks; question (4' pedal solo line piece) From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:18:20 EDT   The Adagio from Widor's Symphony V has a wonderful "singing part" for the = 4' pedal; an assistant for the quick change from 16' + 8' or 16' + man coup. = to the 4' solo (and back again near the end) would be essential.  
(back) Subject: Re: Thanks; question From: "Don Sizemore" <dls@metalab.unc.edu> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:19:40 -0400 (EDT)     |Enough of that. Can you give me other examples of charming pieces |where the pedal part sings along (maybe the melody or maybe not) on a |4' stop? I can off the top of my head think of Bach's "Nun freut euch |. . ." and the "Lobe de Herren" sound-alike, Vaughan-Williams' |Prelude on Song 13 and Krebs' "Wachet auf". Are there others that I |might look at?   although i don't know if i'd call it "charming," one of my favorite rainy day pieces is brahms' setting of "herzlich tut mich verlangen," opus 122 no. 10. i pull a 4' choralbass in the pedal, and take it reallllly slow, savoring the phrasing in the manuals.   donald    
(back) Subject: Re: very strange EBAY sale From: <Tspiggle@aol.com> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:24:48 EDT   $15 is not the price. It's the starting bid. The auction clearly states "reserve not met".   By the way, I have a shed full of old pipes and I'll give you $15 to haul them off.   Tom  
(back) Subject: Kent Tritle, St. Ignatius, 9-26-04 From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:14:57 -0400   Kent Tritle at St. Ignatius Loyola, New York September 26, 2004 8:00 p.m.   In the Friday New York Times music listings on the 24th, James R. = Oestreich submitted the following: "Kent Tritle. With imagination and hard work, = this Organist and conductor has created an important place for himself in the = New York music world. As Director of Music at the Church of St. Ignatius = Loyola, he created 'Sacred Music in a Sacred Space,' a series that has added = greatly to the musical life in the city. But he is first and foremost an excellent =   musician . . . "   It is, by now, something of a tradition, that Kent Tritle, Director of = Music Ministries at this great church, fires the opening shot in what is, for many, a season of earthly, or even other-worldly, delights. In the eleven years since Kent began the series, "Sacred Music in a Sacred Space," the range of magnificent performances we have heard is hard to believe. Some very new music has been fortunate enough to have had definitive, totally convincing performances of music often heard for the first time in New = York. But the tried and true has not been neglected. We have heard, for example, = a performance of "Elijah" with full orchestra, a somewhat rare treat, and = many more masterworks of an earlier day, and all have had fresh life given = them. The 68 stop (91 rank) Mander Organ of 1993 is not neglected, sounding out into a most enviable acoustic, in numerous Organ recitals. It has not, however, been neglected in an ensemble role. I will never, ever, forget a performance of the Saint-Sa=EBns Mass, Opus 4, the Organ, in the role of = the great Parisian Grandes Orgues, sounding out boldly from the west, and answered equally boldly by a large orchestra and choir in the east. I must =   not, however, go on about the glorious past. It's time for last night.   Kent Tritle considers that a major part of performing publicly on the Pipe =   Organ involves a serious study of its repertoire with great consideration given to programming. He did not tell me this - I just know it, as a = veteran of many a Tritle recital. I recall one day coming to the church, probably = to show the Organ to someone, and going by Kent's office, whence came the = sound of some amazing music for trumpet and Organ. I knocked and stuck my head = in, to find him lying flat on his back on the carpet with a score of Franklin Ashdown's "Requiem for the Challenger." This music appeared in a recital some months later by Kent Tritle and the extraordinary Trumpeter Scott McIntosh. Included in that program in addition to the Ashdown was a performance of the Elgar "Nimrod," certainly one of the great melodies of all time, with Scott playing the melody, and the Organ providing a = wonderful accompaniment - hair raising, it was. No one who was there will ever = forget it. One of many programs of contrast and interest. This past Sunday was no =   different, although the music was from a different era.   We heard first "Grand Dialogue in C" by Louis Marchand (1669-1732), a work =   from 1696, giving great scope for this Organ with its firm and exciting = reed sounds, with a richness down to the very bottom, and with very broad and profound flue choruses, often based on full 16' foundations, and all often =   in brilliant dialogue. Jumping several years, but nonetheless <a propos,> = I want to quote the excellent Cleveland Kersh who, in his program notes for this recital, quotes Widor as saying, not at all referring to Marchand, something that really speaks to me, and reflects what I was feeling even = in the Marchand: "It is when I felt the six thousand pipes of the = Saint-Sulpice Organ vibrating under my hands and feet that I took to writing my first = four Organ symphonies. . . . . I was listening to the sonorousness of Saint-Sulpice . . . . . " Those two statements that I have taken = shamelessly out of context really do represent my feelings about this music and all = else we heard in this recital, as played on this large and broad instrument in = an essentially perfect acoustic by a player who knows how to exploit all of that. Clear? Well, at least I know what I mean, and I was hopelessly moved =   by it all.   What happened next was amazing. We were to hear the six Magnificat = Antiphons of Dupr=E9, and it was the first one, "and my spirit hath rejoiced in God = my Savior" that gave me chills! I first heard this piece, I suppose 25 years ago, played by George Black in the chapel of Huron College, London, = Ontario, and it left an incredibly deep impression on me. In the right hand, (we = are in =BE time), there are crunching major and minor seconds in eighth notes = ever attempting to resolve, and at the beginning of the work, all right hand notes are placed high above the staff. The left hand is playing eighth = note triplets in widely spaced arpeggios. This is a poor excuse for actually seeing the score, but the glory of this performance was Kent's use of very =   powerful Flutes that hit the acoustic of the building in an eerie, almost other-worldly way. I suspect I was not the only one holding my breath much =   of the time through this, not wanting to make even the sound of breathing.   That Antiphon set me up for listening with particular sensitivity to the remaining five, following along the amazing text that is Magnificat. Mary was no wimp! Nor is Kent Tritle. He swings through the final Toccata on = the Gloria with a wonderful freedom which is, I do believe, inherent in the work. It was a perfect ending to a most powerful and haunting performance = of these musical responses to the Magnificat Antiphons.   I consider it a fine privilege to have been given a chance to hear a complete Widor Symphony heretofore unknown to me. This is No. 7 in A = Minor, Opus 42, No. 3. Mr. Kersh, in his notes for the program says of this symphony: "It has struggled to find a regular place in the repertoire, no doubt partly due to its substantial technical and musical challenges." I = did a Google search, looking for a recording of this work, and found one by Alain Bouvet on the Cavaill=E9-Coll Organ at St. Etienne in Caen, France. = In fact, you can buy it from the Organ Historical Society Catalog at http://shop.store.yahoo.com/ohscatalog/frensymor18c.html unless you prefer to wait for Kent's recording which one hopes he might = feel the urge to make at St. Ignatius! By the way, if you are in the U.K., as more than a few members of these Organ lists are, you can hear old friend David Liddle perform the complete work at St. Dominic's Priory, London, at =   7:30 on Friday, November 19th. David has made two splendid recordings at = St. Ignatius Loyola on the Guild label, and he also played a recital at the church a few years ago, so some of you may remember his name.   The Seventh Symphony has six movements: Moderato, Choral, Andante, Allegro =   ma non troppo, Lento, and Finale, clearly a work of many moods and = textures. I am still over the moon from this performance, and I find it no surprise that such a very large crowd showed up to listen.   There are French readers of the Pipe Organ List on the Internet, and they will be interested to know that Kent is playing the same program as described above at The Church of St. Sulpice in Paris on Tuesday, October 12th. Only the Marchand "Grand Dialogue in C" from this program was NOT written for that great Cavaill=E9-Coll. Both Dupr=E9 and Widor spent many = years there. This performance is a great honor for Kent, and I know many of us would like to share the experience with him. I hope one of our listmembers =   will be there and will send us all a report.   Coming up Very Soon: Wednesday, October 6 at 8 p.m. A Renaissance Mass from the Cathedral of Seville Francisco Guerrero: Missa Sancta et Immaculata Virginitas The Choir of St. Ignatius Loyola Guest Artists: Piffaro, The Renaissance Band Kent Tritle, Conductor Presented as part of the New York Early Music Celebration ALSO 7:00 P.M. pre-concert Organ Recital by Andrew Henderson--- Baroque and Renaissance music by Bach, Buxtehude, Bull, Schlick and de Grigny   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com