PipeChat Digest #5259 - Wednesday, April 6, 2005
 
Re: SPEC: THE VATICAN GRAND ORGAN (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: The Pope and Sacred Music
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Change of email address.
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: The Pope and Sacred Music
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re:  Stompen klompen
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Re: The Pope and Sacred Music
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Stompen klompen
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: organ recordings
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
16' Bombarde and Scharf II for sale
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Repetative Redundency Again [Re: The Pope and Sacred Music]
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: The Pope and Sacred Music
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #5258 - 04/05/05
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Re: Stompen klompin
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
Orpha Ochse
  by <OrganNYC@aol.com>
The History of Organs in NYC
  by <OrganNYC@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: SPEC: THE VATICAN GRAND ORGAN (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2005 17:24:00 EDT   =20 In a message dated 4/5/05 2:04:03 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, =20 roger.firman@btinternet.com writes:   Please could you explain about the two separate pedal divisions, if I've understood the specification correctly.       There is pedal for each case. Remember that the organ is in twin cases at=20 the very front of the Basilica, between the huge support "columns" of the m= ain=20 dome and the frontmost wall where the Altar of the Chair of St. Peter is. =20 They are literally spread out by, probably, by 200 feet. If I remember=20 correctly, the Great and Choir, I believe, are in the case on the side wher= e the=20 console and choir stalls are, with the Swell and Solo in the opposite case.= =20 The Pedal divisions in each case support the divisions in that particular c= ase=20 and, when both sides are played together, it's a rather broad, full and ric= h=20 sound. =20 =20 Of course, at the back of the Basilica, even when the organ is played full=20 open, it's a very demure sound comparatively due to the sheer vastness of h= e=20 space. It's there, and you can tell there is a large instrument being playe= d,=20 but it is literally a quarter of a mile away and its sound has to bounce=20 against the walls and make it around two gigantic stone walls (literally) A= BOVE=20 the transcepts and THEN down the nave. =20 If you ask me, they should have taken Aristide Cavaill=E9-Coll or Henry Wil= lis=20 up on one of their offers for a large instrument in the rear gallery. =20 Scott F. Foppiano   Organist and Director of Parish Music Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Memphis, TN=20 In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum.  
(back) Subject: Re: The Pope and Sacred Music From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 05 Apr 2005 18:40:50 +0000   On 4/5/05 4:50 AM, "Scott A Montgomery" <montre1978@yahoo.com> wrote:   > They must choose bad places to record the catholic churches in the USA. >=20 > =A7=A7=A7 I=B9m not sure what that sentence means, but I think they=B9ve had a yea= r or > two in which to prepare this music. >=20 > I know many, MANY catholic churches that do excellent music. >=20 > =A7=A7=A7 I should think that you are VERY right. I=B9m not so sure that the va= rious > (arch)diocesan PR officers are alert to them, and choose carefully or wis= ely. >=20 > Alan Freed www.stlukesnyc.org >=20    
(back) Subject: Re: Change of email address. From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 05 Apr 2005 18:49:16 +0000   On 4/5/05 7:40 AM, "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> wrote:   > change of email address   Done; and thank you.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: The Pope and Sacred Music From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 05 Apr 2005 19:00:21 +0000   On 4/5/05 10:54 AM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Is Latvia a catholic country? > I think so, Colin, pretty much. But probably at least half the catholics = in Latvia are of the Lutheran persuasion. (Second and third places are RC = and Russian Orthodox.) Which just MAY explain why they're doing better than = one might expect.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Stompen klompen From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2005 17:03:19 -0700 (PDT)   Dear List Friends: Once again, the perennial subject of footware comes up! :) Seriously, I = have always wondered what organists wore before the advent of paved = streets. Old paintings are really no help at all, because the kind of = footware they depict was always the subject's "Sunday best", and not shoes = that people wore every day in the street. I have seen no descriptions of = organists' wearing special shoes, as many of us do today. But they simply = *must* have changed shoes in most cases when they played. I can barely = remember some unpaved streets and roads in my Mississippi childhood. They = were a mess! After a rain they were mud, or if the soil was the sticky = red clay we had so much of there, they were a sticky, gummy mire. Since = the roads weren't graded regularly, the rain sat in mud puddles for days = and made them almost impassable quagmires. And that was well after the = time that automobiles had supplanted horses as the main means of = transportation. I was told by very old people who had lived at the beginning of the 20th. century that in spring when = everything thawed out, the stench from the horse manure was horrendous. = Look at a 19th. century photo of street scene in a large city like New = York, London, or Paris: there were horses everywhere. Horses, of course, = have an "emissions problem"... and you think that we have a pollution = problem in cities today??!!! :) Mix that with generous helpings of mud, = and you begin to imagine what streets were like in the 19th. century and = before. In the 18th century one had to be careful in cities, because one = was liable to have a chamber pot's contents emptied on your head! In many = cities the streets had open sewers. They may have been paved with = cobblestones in large cities, but they still were covered with muck. One = can quickly understand why people in 19th. century photographs of street = scenes are wearing hats and capes. Almost everyone seems to be wearing = boots of some kind in those photographs. Women wore high boots until the beginning of the 20th. century. So organists then were lucky = to have only mud on their feet, it seems! If one wore the same shoes that one wore outside, then the pedalboard = would quickly have become fouled and encrusted with unspeakable crud. = Organ builders, please correct me if I'm wrong, but I think that kind of = filth would have dreadful consequences for the action of the pedalboard. = If the pedals were encrusted with dirt and you-know-what, then the = pedalboard would have quickly been worn down. Any sensible organist would = know that. I suspect that organists changed out of their boots into a pair = of well worn dress shoes that were comfortable and "broken in". Another = question; do all of you know how awful it feels if there is dirt on the = pedalboard? Even a little grit makes playing very unpleasant. I can't = believe that organists would have liked that sensation any more than than = we do today. For all of these reasons, I personally believe that the idea = that organists wore the same shoes that they wore outside in the street is = false. Formal dress shoes before WWII were often made of rather soft leather, = almost like glove leather. I had some fine formal dress shoes from the = 1920's that were given to me by an elderly uncle when I first started = organ, and they served as my first organ shoes. I even remember the brand = name: Edwin F. Clapp. They were made entirely of leather (soles and = heels, too) and they were quite comfortable. They were also much better = made than any shoes that I have seen recently, even very expensive ones. = They were not at all unlike the men's organ shoes today. If one looks at = paintings and old photos of men in formal clothes, one sees that the shoes = that they wore--which are often almost like slippers-- would probably have = been very good organ shoes. To this day in many parts of Europe, when = enters a private home, one is given a pair of slippers to wear. I'm sure = that is to keep dirt out of the house, and to protect polished wooden = floors. I suspect that organists in earlier times did exactly what we do now: change their shoes to play the organ. At = least we don't have to worry about the "road hazards" that they had to = avoid. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT USA  
(back) Subject: Re: The Pope and Sacred Music From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 08:05:09 +0800   I am playing for the local Catholic Church's Saturday evening mass to be held this Saturday. I have just been given the hymn numbers:   Alleluia No.1 (Don Fishel) Jesus you are bread for us (Christopher Walker) We remember how you loved us (Mary Haugen) How Great Thou art. (Stuart Hine)   We have this fare week after week with slight variation. The sum total of different hymns (?) would be about 12 or 15 at the most, which are = repeated over and over week after week. Traditional hymns are not sung except for = two or three old timers such as How Great Thou Art and Amazing Grace. My contribution will be good organ music which the people tell me they love = to hear. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2005 11:36 PM Subject: Re: The Pope and Sacred Music     > Dear Scott: > > I appreciate the efforts of people like you to convey the solemnity > required in the music of the Mass. Justin Hartz observations are > also valid. Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles and Holy Name > in Chicago need to take note. Here in the West especially California > the music just doesn't attract people like it should because of it's > inherent banality.       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.9.1 - Release Date: 1/04/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Stompen klompen From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 05 Apr 2005 19:19:29 +0000   On 4/5/05 6:07 PM, "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:   > Jarle Farnegham, the young Norwegian organist   Close enough. He'll recognize himself. (Busy with school these days.)   But, if you WANT to be reminded, it's "Fagerheim."   Alan, big admirer of Virgil Fax . . . Fix? . . . No, not [transmission interrupted!]    
(back) Subject: Re: organ recordings From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Tue, 05 Apr 2005 20:24:29 -0500   M Fox wrote: > No no. There is a slight ritard in the middle, then it recommences on > the other side. > > Performance practices of the 78 rpm era, not to be studied nor revived. > > > ----- Original Message ----- > *From:* Justinhartz@aol.com <mailto:Justinhartz@aol.com> > *To:* pipechat@pipechat.org <mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org> > *Sent:* Friday, April 01, 2005 6:00 PM > *Subject:* Re: organ recordings > > The Final from Vierne's 1st on one side of a 10" 78? > I'd love to here it. > He must have broken a speed record! > > Justin   I do have a 10-inch 78 of Reginald Goss-Custard playing Bach's Jig Fugue at a breakneck pace, though (one side!) - and the Widor Toccata on the other side! (Can't remember if either one was cut down a bit - and nothing to play 78's with now...)   John Seboldt Milwaukee, WI  
(back) Subject: 16' Bombarde and Scharf II for sale From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2005 22:08:53 EDT   The following sets of pipework are offered for sale:   Scharff II; 122 pipes, 3-1/2" wind pressure, 1970s   @ 1 (22.26) @ 25 19.22) @ 37 (15.19) @ 43 (12.15) @ 55 (8.12)   $350.00   16' Bombarde/8' Trompette; 73 pipes, 3-1/2" wind pressure, 1970s, likely Giesecke 16' octave with half-length resonators (your pipemaker can make you full-length ones) No scroll damage, as they are simply scored and slightly pried, never = rolled Zinc basses, with the usual 1970s softness, spotted metal resonators from = 4' Open, cylindrical, flat-bottom shallots Good for an addition to an existing organ   $1,200.00   Interested parties please telephone (917) 749-0827 Preference is for the client to collect these in person, but will pack and =   ship on request.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City  
(back) Subject: Repetative Redundency Again [Re: The Pope and Sacred Music] From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Wed, 06 Apr 2005 10:41:47 +0800   Bob,   I can't belive that you don't have more input to the hymn selections. No do= ubt you'd be met by resistance from the clergyman who is doleing this stuff= out, but, with support from the congregation, I think you can make a diffe= rence. Or is this a lost cause to the Eddie Van Halen wanna bes?       ----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> >=20 > I am playing for the local Catholic Church's Saturday evening mass=20 > to be held this Saturday. I have just been given the hymn numbers: >=20 > Alleluia No.1 (Don Fishel) > Jesus you are bread for us (Christopher Walker) > We remember how you loved us (Mary Haugen) > How Great Thou art. (Stuart Hine) >=20 > We have this fare week after week with slight variation. The sum=20 > total of different hymns (?) would be about 12 or 15 at the most,=20 > which are repeated over and over week after week. Traditional hymns=20 > are not sung except for two or three old timers such as How Great=20 > Thou Art and Amazing Grace. My contribution will be good organ=20 > music which the people tell me they love to hear. > Bob Elms. >=20 > ----- Original Message ----- From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> >=20 > > Dear Scott: > > > > I appreciate the efforts of people like you to convey the solemnity > > required in the music of the Mass. Justin Hartz observations are > > also valid. Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles and Holy Name > > in Chicago need to take note. Here in the West especially California > > the music just doesn't attract people like it should because of it's > > inherent banality.   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: The Pope and Sacred Music From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Tue, 05 Apr 2005 23:24:38 -0400   You know, the true weapons of mass destruction are the hymnals that were published after Vatican II, eh?   - WG   ><contrareed@aol.com> >Date: Tue, 05 Apr 2005 13:48:02 -0400 > >-----Original Message----- >From: RonSeverin@aol.com > > >Common instruments like pianos and guitars, drums etc. . > >***************************************************************** >Yup, Instruments of mass destruction......... > >Richard (ducking) > > >        
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #5258 - 04/05/05 From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Tue, 05 Apr 2005 23:29:15 -0400   There's a retort just begging to be posted, but I'm not going there. ;-)   - WG (wearing very manly Organmasters)   >I wonder if there are lady organists who secretly wear >thigh-high boots and fish-nets? > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK (Wearing Grensons) >        
(back) Subject: Re: Stompen klompin From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Tue, 5 Apr 2005 23:46:58 EDT   Ethel Smith seemed to manage the pedals quite well in her stilettos. You could say she resurrected toes only pedal technique long before the revival of early performance practice :)   Justin  
(back) Subject: Orpha Ochse From: <OrganNYC@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 03:04:12 EDT   Does anyone have an email address for Orpha Ochse? Please reply privately. Thank you, Steve Lawson Webmaster - NYC AGO _www.nycago.org_ (http://www.nycago.org)  
(back) Subject: The History of Organs in NYC From: <OrganNYC@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 03:44:02 EDT   As many of you already know, I have made a valiant and hopefully = appreciated attempt to document the organs in NYC for inclusion on the NYC AGO = website. The "hits" on the NYC ORGANS page of the www.nycago.org website are quite =   impressive, so someone is looking. For the most part, these organs are = -- so far -- mainly those organs in the borough of Manhattan, but we hope to = include the outer boroughs as they are made known to us. Brooklyn is especially important in that it was for many years a city separate from New York. My next quest is to include links to the previous organs on each extant venue's web page. For example, Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church will have = a link to the origianl Jardine Organ, and another to the EMS rebuilt, and then = the Austin rebuild, and another link as it is today. If any of you have details or old booklets or brochures in your files = which could be of use, please contact me privately. You saved this stuff so that = someday someone would be interested, and here's your chance to share it! = I am particularly interested in finding photos of the earlier organs. Of = course, I hope to soon go down to Princeton, NJ and look through the OHS archives = and Diapason magazines, once I make arrangements. NYC has such a fascinating history in terms of organs, and I hope to get this information online over the course of the next few years. Any help = you can provide will be appreciated and acknowledged. Thanks! Steve Lawson Webmaster - NYC AGO _www.nycago.org_ (http://www.nycago.org)