PipeChat Digest #5265 - Saturday, April 9, 2005
 
Re: Repetative Redundency Again
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: hymn singing in dwindling congregations
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: hymn singing in dwindling congregations
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
RE: Vatican's organist calls Omaha home_
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
funny stop names
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
stylistic adaptations of hymn accompaniment
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
Re: funny stop names
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
RE: Vatican's organist calls Omaha home_
  by "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com>
Re: funny stop names
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
US pipes and UK transistors featured on Organs and Organists online today
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Winston-Salem N. C.  to Charlottesville VA
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Cheap CDs at OHS Catalog
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
Murray M. Harris and Organ Building in Los Angeles 1894-1913, A New Book
  by "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org>
RE: Repetative Redundency Again [Re: The Pope and Sacred Music]
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
PipeChat IRC this evening,
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: funny stop names-  Lizard?
  by "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Repetative Redundency Again From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 13:45:34 +0100   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, April 08, 2005 7:44 AM Subject: RE: Repetative Redundency Again [Re: The Pope and Sacred Music]     " In the Methodist Church in Britain, the Minister has control of all aspects of the service, including the hymn selection. We organists NEVER choose = the hymns" [snip]   And then again; .................................. but then, I'm Anglican. So, in the immortal Bruce's immortal words ........ "I'm in charge!"   So I chose the Hymns, the Introit(s), the Anthem, the Blessing (inc. = whether or not we'll have one), where the choir will sing, whether they stand or sit, etc, etc, etc.   eg. for the Monday of Holy Week, the choir requested singing the Faure Requiem; Rector agrees to include the event in the calendar; I chose Bible =   Readings, translate the text, publish 'programmes' for the congregation; chose readers ('cos I want DRAMATIC readings), orchestrate and arrange all =   things; including rehearsing the choir and accompanying the music. (As if I'd let anyone else put their hands on 'my beast')......... and got a vote of thanks from the P.C.C. on Wed. for the success of the service (it was NOT pitched as a concert performance).   Now I know that it is not universal (although the church is supposed to = be) but - when you're employing an expert, you should take their advice (and = as much of it as they're prepared to offer).   It can-of reminds me of the well-known truism ............. "The Barrister whose advice is ignored .............. has a fool for a client!"   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a musicman well-known for giving folks the benefit of his advice]   P.S. - Will, if you lust for autonomy, you know where to come.    
(back) Subject: Re: hymn singing in dwindling congregations From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 08:45:02 EDT   >another thing we do at westminster congregational is, whenever an >african-american spiritual is scheduled, the choir rehearses it and it = is sung >unaccompanied in the service. most of the ones in our hymnal (new = century) seem to >sound better unaccompanied (to me, the organ sounds like it's trying to make >it high-church).     >>That's simply because you're NOT playing a Hammond!     We sing spirituals using the pipe organ, but one must know how to adapt = them in order to make them work. I looked at some of the spirituals in the New =   Century Hymnal and the arrangements make the high church. Some of them are =   arranged so "straight" that it automatically makes them loose a lot of the = flavor. The setting of "Take Me to the Water" doesn't look at all like it's = actually sung. "Ev'ry Time I Feel the Spirit" is set much more like a Jubilee = Singers concert setting--a more formal style. Several of the others that I looked = at in that hymnal were the same way.   When playing a spiritual on the pipe organ, don't feel that you have to = play it like you're playing a traditional hymn. It's a whole different style = of playing, like playing a Hammond in gospel style--just doing it on a pipe = organ. On the more upbeat ones, It's also fun to do piano and organ on them, or = just piano, because that gives them a big rhythmic drive. The big thing is = that rarely are notes ever of equal length, notes are often subdivided into = triplets or dotted--so a 4/4 measure is really sung as if it were 12/8. (Notes inegales LOL) This is not always the rule, but it is the way it works more = often than not.   Try it the next time you sing one using the pipe organ and see how it = works...   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: hymn singing in dwindling congregations From: <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 10:16:48 EDT   Hello RMB10@aol.com,     In reference to your comment: Some of them are arranged so "straight" that it automatically makes them loose a lot of = the flavor. The setting of "Take Me to the Water" doesn't look at all like it's = actually sung. "Ev'ry Time I Feel the Spirit" is set much more like a Jubilee Singers concert setting--a more formal style. Several of the others that I = looked at in that hymnal were the same way. ~~~~~~~~~~ The AME Zion Hymnal is no better. The only GOOD one I've seen = is the new African American Heritage Hymnal from Gia Press.   When playing a spiritual on the pipe organ, don't feel that you have to = play it like you're playing a traditional hymn. It's a whole different style = of playing, like playing a Hammond in gospel style--just doing it on a pipe organ. On the more upbeat ones, It's also fun to do piano and organ on them, or just piano, because that gives them a big rhythmic drive. The big thing is = that rarely are notes ever of equal length, notes are often subdivided into triplets or dotted--so a 4/4 measure is really sung as if it were 12/8. (Notes inegales LOL) This is not always the rule, but it is the way it works = more often than not. ~~~~~~~~~~Another thing I've found that works is where you put the = accents. Bach and "traditional" hymnody et. al. used the first and the third beat; =   spirituals really do better on the second and fourth. Victoria Hedberg Organist/Choir Director St. Paul AME Zion Church Quogue, NY  
(back) Subject: RE: Vatican's organist calls Omaha home_ From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Fri, 08 Apr 2005 09:51:18 -0700   Does anyone recognize this organ console? I guess whoever plays it would need to have verrrrry long arms.......   ~ C    
(back) Subject: funny stop names From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 13:06:56 EDT   http://home.ix.netcom.com/%7Etadstone/unknown.htm       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: stylistic adaptations of hymn accompaniment From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 10:21:55 -0700   There's been some discussion of hymn accompaniment on the list of late and = I think this is a very pertinent part of the whole evolution of church music in this era where we are exposed to so much music of all types via the = media available.   While I was organist at Trinity Episcopal in Florence, Alabama, we had a "sister" relationship with a black Baptist church nearby. We did a lot of things together (catfish fries were great,) but the most eye-opening for = me were shared evening worship services. When at Trinity, we did a fairly traditional Evensong, when at the Baptist church, we did it their way. = They had a Hammond organ, drum set, and bass guitar. I watched those musicians play without a score and while the beginnings were always "rough," by the time the singers and congregation joined, it was electric.   When the Church Hymnal Corp. published Wonder, Love, Praise (WLP) the = intent was to include melodies from many different cultures as well as to offer additional service settings. I attended a workshop by Alice Parker and = our resource was WLP. The accompaniments are all very "vanilla," and through her teaching of singing those pieces unaccompanied using various improvisation techniques (hand-clapping, etc, just about anything you = could do with two hands and feet) the music came alive in a way the = accompaniments actually prevented. There are some great things in WLP, regardless, but some of the best go unused.   Next came Lift Every Voice (LEVAS, II.) I've mentioned this before, but = do so again because there is a very good introduction with clear simple explanations that gospel musicians use to "spice up" the accompaniments of these songs.   I can definitely tell a difference in the way the congregation sings when these hymns are accompanied in a stylistic manner that they have heard and connect with these same hymns via the media. When I play strictly what is written in the book, there is less energy. The intro in the hymnal = (LEVAS) makes it very clear that the printed accompaniments are only a road map = and are musicians are encouraged to develop the techniques to play these hymns stylistically correct. And honestly, it is not that hard. I picked it up quickly by choosing a tune I had heard done in the black church back home and by following the instructions I was doing what I had feared I would never be able to do.   After working in churches where the minister picks out the hymns and also doing so myself, I can say that there are positive aspects to both approaches. I'm currently having to get used to doing all this hymn and liturgical music planning again, and there have been quite a few times I found it inconvenient and thought it ain't so bad when the minister takes = on this chore, until of course, they choose some horrible tune!   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California        
(back) Subject: Re: funny stop names From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 19:30:44 +0200   Hi, and don't forget this ones in the piporg-l archives at: http://listserv.albany.edu:8080/cgi-bin/wa?A2=3Dind9605E&L=3Dpiporg-l&P=3DR= 9596 Greetings   Arno    
(back) Subject: RE: Vatican's organist calls Omaha home_ From: "Tom Hoehn" <thoehn@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 14:05:59 -0400   http://www.pasiorgans.com/instruments/opus14.html   Tom Hoehn, Organist Roaring 20's Pizza & Pipes, Ellenton, FL (substitute - 4/42 Wurlitzer) First United Methodist Church, Clearwater, FL (4/9?- = Rodgers/Ruffati/Wicks) Manasota/OATOS/HiloBay/CIC-ATOS/VotS-ATOS/DTOS http://theatreorgans.com/tomhoehn http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOUploads/   > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of > Charlie Lester > Sent: Friday, April 08, 2005 12:51 PM > To: PipeChat > Subject: RE: Vatican's organist calls Omaha home_ >=20 >=20 > Does anyone recognize this organ console? I guess whoever=20 > plays it would need to have verrrrry long arms....... >=20 > ~ > C >=20 >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20 >=20      
(back) Subject: Re: funny stop names From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 13:07:21 -0500   Strangely enough, one of these stopnames actually is a musical = instrument -- the Lizard. A Lizard is a tenor Zinck. I have have never = actually come across a Lizard as an organ stop (though I imagine it = would be at 8 or 4 ft. pitch rather than 2.2/3 ft.), but the Zinck = (Ger.) or Cinq (Dutch) is certainly sometimes found as a 2 ft. Pedal = reed on old European organs.   John Speller ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Gfc234@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Friday, April 08, 2005 12:06 PM Subject: funny stop names     http://home.ix.netcom.com/%7Etadstone/unknown.htm    
(back) Subject: US pipes and UK transistors featured on Organs and Organists online today From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 9 Apr 2005 00:16:38 +0300   This week's "new additions" feature two outstanding pipe organs from the USA - played by David Lines, and the Copemann Hart digital organ installed =   in Keble College, Oxford, played by Andrew Fletcher. Both organists are recitalists of international standing, so their performances go without saying. David Lines plays the "Cantique" by Edward Elgar on the III/35 Father Willis organ (1885) in its new home across the water in St. = Joseph's Parish Church, Seattle, and Handel's "Arioso" on the IV/79 Kenneth Jones organ in the Cathedral of the Madeleine, Salt Lake City, Utah. David is playing his own arrangement in this recording.   Andrew Fletcher, who was organ scholar at Keble College, Oxford and FRCOTurpin Prize winner at the age of 20, plays Sir Charles Villiers Stanford's "Postlude in D minor" and Norman Cocker's "Tuba Tune" on the III/58 Copemann Hart digital organ in Keble College, Oxford.   C V Stanford (1852 - 1924) was born in Dublin, and is probably best known today for his sublime settings of the evening service in B flat, C and G. Although he was an Irishman, his music seems to epitomise the spirit of = the English Cathedral. You can read the Musical Times tribute to him published =   in May, 1924 at http://www.musicaltimes.co.uk/archive/obits/192405stanford.html   If you have a moment, drop in on two new member's, Australian organ enthusiast Julie who has a comprehensive site with a wide range of = interests at http://www.angelfire.com/grrl/birdonarz/ and Jean Moquin who lives in Quebec and has three analog Rodgers organs, which he has beautifully restored - one of them can be seen at http://theatreorgans.com/canada/qc/rodgers.htm This is in fact a three manual church model 330, though since this photo was taken he has acquired =   two more, a two manual church model and a three manual theatre organ = model.   So - good listening!       John Foss   http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/about.htm http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: Winston-Salem N. C. to Charlottesville VA From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Fri, 08 Apr 2005 17:21:37 -0400   Permit me another travel questions as I lace together a trip of pipe = organs and historical sites:   I might likely be driving from Winston-Salem NC to Charlottesville VA. = It would be fewer miles to drive U. S. Rt. 29 north to Charlottesville, but = can anyone comment whether I'd make better time with less stress to go the = long way around on U. S. 52 north to I-77, then north on I-77 to I-81 north on I-81 to I-64 and then east to Charlottesville?   Thanx.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Cheap CDs at OHS Catalog From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 17:38:18 -0400   A special group of CDs for $1.99 to $3.99 are now available at the OHS Catalog http://www.ohscatalog.org   Several additions to this special group have been made from recent recordings produced by the fine Pro Organo label operated by Fred Hohman = who was featured on the Pipedreams program a week ago.   Bill    
(back) Subject: Murray M. Harris and Organ Building in Los Angeles 1894-1913, A New Book From: "William T. Van Pelt" <bill@organsociety.org> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 17:34:38 -0400   "Murray M. Harris and Organ Building in Los Angeles 1894-1913" is a new = book published by the Organ Historical Society. The author, David Lennox = Smith, died in 1979, so the manuscript has been updated and edited by Orpha Ochse with the help of Jack Bethards, Kevin Gilchrist, Jim Lewis, and Manuel Rosales. The book may be ordered as the first item on the opening page of the OHS Catalog website http://www.ohscatalog.org   Murray M. Harris returned in 1894 from his Boston apprenticeship with organbuilder George S. Hutchings to a booming Los Angeles where only eight pipe organs existed. Six years later, Los Angeles would have 154 churches = in it and scores of new pipe organs. Harris and organ tuner Henry C. Fletcher became business partners and founded the city's first organbuilding firm, Fletcher & Harris.   Several new firms sprang from this beginning and many more than 100 organs were built by 1913, including the world's largest for the Louisiana = Purchase Exposition (better known as the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair). That organ would become Philadelphia's famous Wanamaker Organ after Alexandre = Guilmant had played 40 recitals on it at the Fair, repeating no pieces.   David Lennox Smith carefully gathered the history of Harris and his contemporaries and the organs they built for his doctoral dissertation = that was all but complete when Smith was murdered by an unknown assailant on March 5, 1979. For this publication, Orpha Ochse has updated Smith's research.   The book includes an annotated opus list, listings of organbuilders from = the Los Angeles City Directories, many stoplists and photographs, and = technical details in 344 pages, hardbound.   Bill    
(back) Subject: RE: Repetative Redundency Again [Re: The Pope and Sacred Music] From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sat, 09 Apr 2005 06:21:22 +0800   If I were handed the hymns during the prelude, they would get "a load of mo= dern rubbish which nobody knows..." ;-) I ain't nothin' without some practice time under my belt during the week.     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: RE: Repetative Redundency Again [Re: The Pope and Sacred Music] Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 07:44:56 +0100   >=20 > In the Methodist Church in Britain, the Minister has control of all aspec= ts > of the service, including the hymn selection. We organists NEVER choose t= he > hymns. Very very occasionally we might make a suggestion for a change, for > instance if two ministers choose the same hymn for morning and evening > services, but generally we have no input. We just play 'em... >=20 > Now and then we may have to dig our heels in when some rude individual > neglects to send the hymns in advance, and walks in and hands them to you > whilst you are playing the Prelude. Inevitably this type will have chosen= a > load of modern rubbish which nobody knows... [Sigh]   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: PipeChat IRC this evening, From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 08 Apr 2005 20:44:46 -0400   All members of PipeChat are invited to join us in the PipeChat IRC any Friday and Monday evening - beginning at 9.00 PM Eastern Time.   To find out more about the Chat room, or how to get into it, go to PipeChat-L web page at http://www.pipechat.org/   You will find out all you need to know to join us.   Tonight at 9.00 PM, - I hope that we will see you there.   Cheers,   Bob Conway        
(back) Subject: Re: funny stop names- Lizard? From: "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Fri, 8 Apr 2005 23:39:41 -0400   Would the "Lizard" be pronounced Lee-ZARD, L' Izard, LiZar', "L' = -zard, Lay-zard, or Luh-zard? or whould it be some other pronuciation?     Nelson