PipeChat Digest #5283 - Thursday, April 21, 2005
 
Re: Need Sweet, Sweet Spirit Fast
  by "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net>
Hector outdoes himself at Methuen - case of the broken B
  by "Charlie Jack" <Charlie@Jack.NET>
Re: Hector outdoes himself at Methuen - case of the broken B
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
reed cleaning
  by "Brad Richards" <richards_brad@hotmail.com>
Re: Consoles [on-topic]
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Consoles [on-topic]
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Consoles [on-topic]
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Flash Harry at a Sraight Pedal-board
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Ostertanz
  by "Jorge Gomez" <qvixotes@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Need Sweet, Sweet Spirit Fast From: "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net> Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2005 20:10:06 -0500   By the way, the name of the book is "A Quiet Time in the Garden of Prayer".   Carla C     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Thurletta Brown-Gavins" <tmbrown@vance.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, April 20, 2005 5:46 PM Subject: Need Sweet, Sweet Spirit Fast     > I'm playing for a joint worship service Sunday afternoon and the nice > prelude I had selected was zapped today by the planning pastors in favor > of Doris Akers' "Sweet, Sweet Spirit." I don't enjoy playing preludes > from a hymnal and am too stressed out to create an "un-hymnified" > arrangement in Finale. An online search has yielded nothing. Can anyone > share or direct me to a nice organ arrangement of "Sweet, Sweet Spirit"? > Thanks in advance to anyone who can help. > Thurletta Brown-Gavins > >> ***************************************************************** * > >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >> List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > >> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > >> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > ***************************************************************** * > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: Hector outdoes himself at Methuen - case of the broken B From: "Charlie Jack" <Charlie@Jack.NET> Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2005 22:27:51 -0400   Hector Olivera played the Methuen Memorial Music Hall on Sunday April 17th. As usual he played marvelously and had the audience in his hands the entire way but an incident that happened raised him to a whole new level.   Hector's first half consisted of Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor followed by Dupre's Prelude and Fugue in G minor followed by all five movements of Vierne's 2nd symphony.   About two minutes into the fifth movement of the Vierne he was playing on the lower manual where he had most everything coupled. The middle B return spring broke creating a rather major cipher. He continued playing on the manual alternatively using his left and right thumbs to hold the broken key up so it wouldn't sound. When his right hand was free for a moment he reached for a 3x5 card I had left for him on the right jamb but dropped it on the pedal board. He continued playing and again when the right hand had a free moment reached down and picked up the card and held it with his teeth. Finally he had another moment with a hand free then used the card to jam the key up and finished the piece to a rousing ovation. If you know the Vierne 2nd you know how busy his hands (and feet) were during the entire movement.   Normally the story would end there but it doesn't. After explaining what had happened, several people in the audience who were amateur organ builders attempted to repair the key. At first there was thought of stealing a spring from a lesser used key but that would have meant disassembling the console which just wasn't feasible. After about ten minutes Hector came back out and upon surveying the situation went to the basement and retrieved some organ parts that he had spotted earlier in the day. Attached to these pneumatic relays was piano wire. He got a pair of pliers and fashioned a return spring out of the piano wire and instructed Doug who was lying on his back on the pedal board to try it. It was way too stiff so he suggested that another attempt be made to fashion a spring that wasn't as stiff. It worked but Hector described the result as having a single note that felt like a coupled down tracker but he finished the program consisting of the Liszt "Ad Nos" and an improvisation on tunes provided by the lady whose name I had written on the 3x5 card and the Armenian Hyre Mer (Our Father) which he had only played through once before so he could register it.   Hector told me that this kind of thing had only happened to him once before on the Fisk in the Myerson center in Dallas. A tracker broke and disengaged from the pallet in such a way that he couldn't silence it. Fortunately in that case a C. B. Fisk person was there and repaired it so he could go on.   I have known and admired Hector for about 25 years but this incident took my admiration to a whole new level.   Charlie Jack  
(back) Subject: Re: Hector outdoes himself at Methuen - case of the broken B From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2005 23:28:35 EDT   told you -- just plain scary.  
(back) Subject: reed cleaning From: "Brad Richards" <richards_brad@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 04:01:36 +0000   open question..... what is the best material to use for cleaning the brass =   tongues of reeds. I have heard anything from emory cloth and wet dry 1200 =   grit sandpaper, to a dollar bill, to brasso, to don't clean them.... just wipe the dust off. The reeds in question are from an 8' clarinet voiced = on 4.5" and have not been touched in 20 yrs. they have anything from normal dust to sheetrock dust, to condensation deposits on them. Come on Sebastion, throw in your 2 cents   thanks in advance.   Brad R. Richards still searching for that cool catchphrase to pigeonhole myself into owner of a 52 Ford F6 dually, and 6 cats      
(back) Subject: Re: Consoles [on-topic] From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2005 22:18:57 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   I LOVE THEATRE ORGANS!   I sort of play them too, but I never get chance to practise on one. Nevertheless, I've given a couple of public concerts on a 4/24 Wurlitzer.   There's an interesting point about Wurlitzers. In the heyday of the typical orchstral organ, only a Wurlitzer could produce the right sort of sounds for French Baroque music!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> wrote: > > I think it says basically that in this varied world > of pipe organs it > is OK that there is also a little organ corner > reserved for strictly > FUN!     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Consoles [on-topic] From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 17:43:15 +1200   >There's an interesting point about Wurlitzers. In the heyday of the typical orchstral organ, only a Wurlitzer could produce the right sort of sounds for French Baroque music!!   Colin, Some years ago (about 1964, it was) I gave a lecture to the Wellington Organists' Association here saying what you have, and that the WurliTzer = is a the logical successor to the French Baroque in terms of available sonorities. Some laughed, some took me very seriously. I think I was being more serious than funny. But yes, French Baroque works wonderfully well on them. There is a 3/16 WurliTzer only 5 mins drive from my home and I'll = play French Baroque there happily, whereas German Baroque plain sounds daft.   I was given a tape the other day, by the way, dubbed from somewhere, on which someone plays the Chopin Military Polonaise, Beethoven's fur Elise, all kinds of "classical stuff" and finishes off with a stunning = performance of the Widor Toccata, all on a largish WurliTzer. Dazzling technique and very fine musicianship, I might add. Completely floored me - even better than Denis James (I've heard him, live, here in NZ).   Changing topics utterly. I thought of a joke about how Ratzinger got the name of Benedict:   CONCLAVE: You, Cardinal Ratzinger, have been elected Pope. RATZINGER: Well said! CONCLAVE: Benedict it is, then.   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Consoles [on-topic] From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 13:51:06 +0800   Don't you just hate it when you have to swap out the console for Communion = Sundays? ;-)   ----- Original Message ----- From: "John Vanderlee" <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: Re: Consoles [on-topic] Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2005 13:37:03 -0700   <snip> > What does it prove? That Theatre organs belong where alcohol is=20 > served? Possibly..... the Organ Stop Pizza in Mesa serves beer and=20 > not a bored face in the crowd! >=20 > I think it says basically that in this varied world of pipe organs=20 > it is OK that there is also a little organ corner reserved for=20 > strictly FUN! >=20 > just my 2c. >=20 > John V -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: Flash Harry at a Sraight Pedal-board From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 08:16:43 +0100   Well, I don't have a choice. 'The Beast' I play with (1864 Walker) has a flat pedalboard. Still, at least the bench is situated a reasonable distamce from the wall behind me so that my reasonably ample frame (6' 3") can be in a properly adjusted position to play.   How many times do we find that the organ is OK; but the architect has = placed other pieces of church furniture (choir stalls, railings, etc) too close = to the organ to get the bench far back enough ? GRRRR!   My problem with 'The Beast' is that the swell pedal (unbalanced, original mechanical action) protrudes from the right hand side of the frame and - when 'open' - obscures Ab/Bb, and you have to be MOST accurate sliding = your toe underneath to play those notes.   It's not really a problem. Playing this instrument is rather like driving = a vintage sports car - which is as much being a mechanic as being a driver; = in this case it is being able to keep factors other than 'musical' ones in mind.   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a musicman rather delighted that we have had the topic 'Flash' = Harry recently ........ normally I only have 20 minutes to save the Universe !]   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Wednesday, April 20, 2005 2:16 PM Subject: Flash Harry   > That's what Tommy Beecham called Malcolm Seargent, but > of course, he also looked down at the grave of Parry > (?) which states, "Here lies a fine musician and > organist." > > Beecham turned, and replied, "How did they get them > both in the same grave?"   And I always thought that the rejoindre was ... "So who is he sharing with =   ?"   BUT ....... why are there no such figures these days; and, in the case of Beecham, why (though they might be excellent musicians) does no-one have = the same grasp of language ?      
(back) Subject: Ostertanz From: "Jorge Gomez" <qvixotes@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 09:46:20 +0200 (CEST)   Hello all:   I've heard Ostertanz by Theo Wegmann. Anybody knows if this work is in print now?   Many thanks   Jorge Gomez       ______________________________________________ Renovamos el Correo Yahoo!: =A1250 MB GRATIS! Nuevos servicios, m=E1s seguridad http://correo.yahoo.es