PipeChat Digest #5284 - Thursday, April 21, 2005
 
Re: Most Progressive Denomination
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
RE: Consoles [on-topic]
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Consoles
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Pipe organ in the Wall Street Journal - x posted.
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Re: Consoles [on-topic]
  by "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net>
pedalboards
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Ostertanz
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: Flash Harry at a Sraight Pedal-board
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Case of the "Discovered" Organ!!
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: Consoles
  by "robertelms" <robertelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Consoles
  by "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca>
Re: Need Sweet, Sweet Spirit Fast
  by "Thurletta Brown-Gavins" <tmbrown@vance.net>
French theatre organs
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: French theatre organs
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: French theatre organs
  by "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Most Progressive Denomination From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 08:04:11 -0400   From Monty: "Other than the Unitarian-Universalists, every denomination = has its faction of conservatives and liberals."   A small point. I can't speak about every denomination, but UUs are one of the ones I'm familiar with and they certainly shouldn't be named as an exception. There is wide variation among their churches in terms of their relative alignment--or lack thereof--with traditional Christian roots. At one extreme is a movement that proposes to bring back Holy Communion as a regular part of the service, and at the other are congregations where members become incensed at even the mention of God (with a capital G).    
(back) Subject: RE: Consoles [on-topic] From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 05:23:09 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Great minds think alike Ross....I also said this in a Uni lecture about "the lighter side of classical".   I believe it to be the case, that we have the Fair Organ builder Gavioli to thank for the invention of keen string-tone and the frein harmonique.   He, in turn, must have been grateful for the 1801 patent taken out by Jaquard for the folding-card loom mechanism. (I believe that the invention pre-dates the patent, and JUST places it in the 18th century by a year or two)   Would we ever have had the Mozart K608 but for musical toys and novelties?   And just who WAS Fr.Primitivus Niamiche, whom I believe made the clock which played it?   When grown men play with toys, watch out....they're plotting something!   Now let me see.....2gms of enriched Plutonium and insert the planar detonator cartridge....a quick wind of the handle.......and......   Regards,   Colin MItchell UK       --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote: > > Colin, > Some years ago (about 1964, it was) I gave a lecture > to the Wellington > Organists' Association here saying what you have, > and that the WurliTzer is > a the logical successor to the French Baroque     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Small Business - Try our new resources site! http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/resources/  
(back) Subject: Consoles From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 08:59:47 -0500   >From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> >Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 06:40:04 +1200   >>Probably the reason that horseshoe consoles have not caught on for >>church organs is because of their unseemly association with the=20 >>vulgar theatre organ.=20   >I doubt if this is so. Most people these days, including organists, have >never ever seen a WurliTzer, much less try one, and wouldn't have a clue >what the thing is that the organist sits at.=20   >Ross   No...I think he's right, but not because of their "unseemly association" with the public in general, but because of that with "organists" and perhaps church organ committees. =20   Here in the United States, I think most organists are quite familiar with the imagery of the theatre pipe organ, and especially it's console. I daresay that most organists prefer a different approach when it comes to a church or concert organ, and that's really who decides the style and type of console, isn't? The organist? Or perhaps some interested organ buff on the organ committee. The congregation could care less. And probably, here in the United States, more people are acquainted with the visual characteristics of the theatre pipe organ than with the concert or church organ!   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Pipe organ in the Wall Street Journal - x posted. From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 10:10:26 EDT   Greetings: I opened this morning's Wall Street Journaland on page D7 read an article =   about A PIPE ORGAN. Paul Jacobs is perorming tonight at St. Ignatius Loyola in NYC. The = article, by Barbara Jepson, is very complimentary of both pipe organ and Paul = Jacobs. The article covers one fourth of a Wall Street Journal page! One comment BJepson makes is "Mr. Jacobs refuses to impose either of the organ world's two primary philosophies (on his listeners)." She is = referring to the classical vs. romantic philosophies, of course. If you can get to the library, or a news stand, do so. The article is good = reading. Musically, Stan Krider  
(back) Subject: Re: Consoles [on-topic] From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 09:18:52 -0500   What typical theater sounds are closer to authentic French Baroque than = the orchestral voices were? Now I am curious...     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, April 21, 2005 12:18 AM Subject: Re: Consoles [on-topic]     > Hello, > > I LOVE THEATRE ORGANS! > > I sort of play them too, but I never get chance to > practise on one. Nevertheless, I've given a couple of > public concerts on a 4/24 Wurlitzer. > > There's an interesting point about Wurlitzers. In the > heyday of the typical orchstral organ, only a > Wurlitzer could produce the right sort of sounds for > French Baroque music!! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > --- John Vanderlee <jovanderlee@vassar.edu> wrote: >> >> I think it says basically that in this varied world >> of pipe organs it >> is OK that there is also a little organ corner >> reserved for strictly >> FUN! > > > __________________________________________________ > Do You Yahoo!? > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around > http://mail.yahoo.com > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > >      
(back) Subject: pedalboards From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 09:19:38 -0500   Sebastian Gluck wrote:   "The modern radiating and concave pedal clavier was developed about a century ago in order to more directly address the way the human body is constructed and the way its joints move. The flat, parallel pedalboard is preferred almost universally by those whose legs are one meter apart and who were born without ankles, yet one might find that playing with agility at the extremes of the pedalboard without undue and unbalanced changes in posture is facilitated by the incorporation of the curved pedalboard."   That could be one way to state it. Incidentally, I recently corresponded with a colleague of mine on this very matter, and he had the following to say about flat-straight pedalboards versus AGO pedalboards:   "By the way, regarding your statement in the article about pedalboards: I have to say that I am a complete advocate of non-radiating flat pedalboards. Having come to play on an instrument with such a pedalboard, I can tell you how much easier it is to play. When I auditioned here, I did not miss a single pedal note due to the pedal keyboard. I have also heard that for someone coming from an American-style pedalboard, it takes very little to get used to a flat one. When the situation is turned around, it takes the other person about two weeks to get used to a concave-radiating pedalboard. Then, when one considers the fact that only a tiny bit of the repertoire was conceived for an American-style board (Sowerby, etc.), this convinces me further. I have played works by Widor and Tournemire that are a challenge to bring off on a flat pedalboard, much less concave. It seems to me that since the keyboard is already a sort of irregular thing, that it makes no sense to make it even more irregular through some attempt at ergonomics. You may be aware that the same was tried to either the piano or organ manuals. It was a failure. Unfortunately, we persist in this country in believing that our pedalboards are somehow more advanced. And, for those who are short, all one has to do is to pivot a little further to reach low C. Anyways, sorry for the lecture, but I must say that when I find a position in which I will be staying for many years, one of the first expenses which I shall request is the construction of a new pedalboard. How saddening it is to remember that Dr. Moulder told me that the new pedalboard at St. Sulpice is more along American lines."   "One thing upon which I will comment, however, is that many people do not realize that a concave radiating pedalboard changes one's posture. A flat pedalboard requires different posture - better posture at the organ."   As for me...well, for several years I played each Sunday at two downtown churches--a mass or two at St. Agnes Cathedral which had a flat-straight pedalboard, and services for Grace United Methodist Church (right across the street from St. Agnes!) which has a modern, AGO-style console. Truth be known, I really enjoyed the feel of the nineteenth-century style console better, because the aesthetics and mechanisms reminded me of original Cavaille-Coll consoles and other nineteenth century organs I have played in Paris. But, practically speaking, I made the same repertoire work week after week on both organs, despite the differences in pedalboard standards. =20   I can't really say that I prefer one over the other. Both were on fine instruments, and I learned to adjust. Eventually I could tell the difference in the intervals, and it wasn't a big deal. There are other aspects of organ design that are more important to the overall outcome.=20   Daniel Hancock=20 Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Ostertanz From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 09:24:37 -0500   Klaus Beckmann's Repertorium says: 1985 Kunzelmann GM 1163. This may not = be what you're looking for: Perhaps if I read between the lines, you may be saying you knew the work was published and that it went out of print and = are wondering if it's been reprinted and is currently available. If this is = so, I can't help you there.   I guess the piece is based on Christ lag in Todesbanden and was the first thing of his that was published. I've never heard of Wegmann (born in Switzerland in 1951), but his "Alla Rumba" sounds interesting.   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: Jorge Gomez <qvixotes@yahoo.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, April 21, 2005 2:46 AM Subject: Ostertanz     > Hello all: > > I've heard Ostertanz by Theo Wegmann. Anybody knows if > this work is in print now? > > Many thanks > > Jorge Gomez    
(back) Subject: Re: Flash Harry at a Sraight Pedal-board From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 10:26:47 -0400   The organ over here in Enfield, a 1900's Cole. . . has a straight=20 pedalboard, with the swell shoe over on the right, as well. This makes it= =20 WAAAAAY to tempting to become a "LFL", and to play the bass line with my=20 left foot only. but the position of the toe levers forces me to use my righ= t=20 foot. And it doesnt help that the little Gremlins that live in middle C of= =20 the Open Diapason facade pipe scream and wail when I dont use my right foot= .. At church now. . .I just noticed something. . . going to go check it out,= =20 it cant be what I think it is. Be right back,=20 NFR   On 4/21/05, Harry Grove <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> wrote:=20 >=20 > Well, I don't have a choice. 'The Beast' I play with (1864 Walker) has a > flat pedalboard. > Still, at least the bench is situated a reasonable distamce from the wall > behind me so that my reasonably ample frame (6' 3") can be in a properly > adjusted position to play. >=20 > How many times do we find that the organ is OK; but the architect has=20 > placed > other pieces of church furniture (choir stalls, railings, etc) too close= =20 > to > the organ to get the bench far back enough ? GRRRR! >=20 > My problem with 'The Beast' is that the swell pedal (unbalanced, original > mechanical action) protrudes from the right hand side of the frame and - > when 'open' - obscures Ab/Bb, and you have to be MOST accurate sliding=20 > your > toe underneath to play those notes. >=20 > It's not really a problem. Playing this instrument is rather like driving= =20 > a > vintage sports car - which is as much being a mechanic as being a driver;= =20 > in > this case it is being able to keep factors other than 'musical' ones in > mind. >=20 > Harry Grove > [a.k.a. a musicman rather delighted that we have had the topic 'Flash'=20 > Harry > recently ........ normally I only have 20 minutes to save the Universe !] >=20 > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Wednesday, April 20, 2005 2:16 PM > Subject: Flash Harry >=20 > > That's what Tommy Beecham called Malcolm Seargent, but > > of course, he also looked down at the grave of Parry > > (?) which states, "Here lies a fine musician and > > organist." > > > > Beecham turned, and replied, "How did they get them > > both in the same grave?" >=20 > And I always thought that the rejoindre was ... "So who is he sharing wit= h > ?" >=20 > BUT ....... why are there no such figures these days; and, in the case of > Beecham, why (though they might be excellent musicians) does no-one have= =20 > the > same grasp of language ? >=20 > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >=20 >=20     --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/  
(back) Subject: Case of the "Discovered" Organ!! From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 10:32:14 -0400   I thought I noticed something funny about this church when I saw it. The=20 outside looks much bigger than the inside, due to the boarded-up orgn loft= =20 in the back. I had always assumed that whatever organ was dead or removed,= =20 but this isn't the case! I found what looks to be an old Skinner, about a= =20 III/30, I would imaginen that it isnt wired up. . . gonna go check the=20 blowers and see how bad it is... R   --=20 Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut Organist, Holy Cross PNCC Enfield, Connecticut Moderator/Owner: Monarch of Music=20 http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/monarch_of_music/  
(back) Subject: Re: Consoles From: "robertelms" <robertelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 22:40:31 +0800   I have seen pictures of many organs which have, if not a Wurlitzer type horse shoe console something very like it. One that I have seen has the horse shoe console with stop tabs in a semicircle (St Mary's Cathedral = Perth West Australia). It is a 1960s rebuild by JE Dodd and Son, of a 1910 JE = Dodd and Son (South Aust.) 3 manuals 60+ stops. The nave console of St Mary's Cathedral Sydney also has stops in a semicircle around the player in much the same sort of arrangement as a horseshoe console. This is by Le Tourneau.I have seen photos of others in Europe and elsewhere that have = the same sort of shape. Maybe they are more common than you may think.They = might not look exactly like Wurlies but they have the same sort of = configuration. Bob Elms. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, April 21, 2005 9:59 PM Subject: Consoles     >From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> >Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 06:40:04 +1200   >>Probably the reason that horseshoe consoles have not caught on for >>church organs is because of their unseemly association with the >>vulgar theatre organ.   >I doubt if this is so. Most people these days, including organists, have >never ever seen a WurliTzer, much less try one, and wouldn't have a clue >what the thing is that the organist sits at.   >Ross   No...I think he's right, but not because of their "unseemly association" with the public in general, but because of that with "organists" and perhaps church organ committees.   Here in the United States, I think most organists are quite familiar with the imagery of the theatre pipe organ, and especially it's console. I daresay that most organists prefer a different approach when it comes to a church or concert organ, and that's really who decides the style and type of console, isn't? The organist? Or perhaps some interested organ buff on the organ committee. The congregation could care less. And probably, here in the United States, more people are acquainted with the visual characteristics of the theatre pipe organ than with the concert or church organ!   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       -- No virus found in this incoming message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.10.1 - Release Date: 20/04/2005         -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.308 / Virus Database: 266.10.1 - Release Date: 20/04/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Consoles From: "nelson denton" <ndenton@cogeco.ca> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 11:09:26 -0400   The Woodstock Crgan Companies of Woodstock Ontario built hundreds of = organs in the 1920'-1940's. The majority of them had horse shoe consoles with = roll tops. I've got 3 shells in storage!.   Nelson    
(back) Subject: Re: Need Sweet, Sweet Spirit Fast From: "Thurletta Brown-Gavins" <tmbrown@vance.net> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 11:14:38 -0300   Thanks so much, Carla! Had a chance to hear the arrangement at the Lillenas site and download a page of her arrangement. Just ordered the collection from an area music store and it should be here tomorrow....so I = guess you know what I'll be doing between tomorrow afternoon and 5:30 pm Sunday. ;o) Thanks also to Robert Bell. I had seen the SheetMusicPlus link last night, = but was afraid it would be too much like the arrangements I have already in hymnals. Anyway, being in this list really pays off! Thanks to all who replied. Thurleta > ---------------------------------------------------------------------- > > Subject: Re: Need Sweet, Sweet Spirit Fast > From: "cc" <belcanto@brainerd.net> > Date: Wed, 20 Apr 2005 20:10:06 -0500 > > By the way, the name of the book is "A Quiet Time in the Garden > of Prayer". > > Carla C > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Thurletta Brown-Gavins" <tmbrown@vance.net> > To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Wednesday, April 20, 2005 5:46 PM > Subject: Need Sweet, Sweet Spirit Fast > > >> I'm playing for a joint worship service Sunday afternoon and > the nice >> prelude I had selected was zapped today by the planning pastors > in favor >> of Doris Akers' "Sweet, Sweet Spirit." I don't enjoy playing > preludes >> from a hymnal and am too stressed out to create an > "un-hymnified" >> arrangement in Finale. An online search has yielded nothing. > Can anyone >> share or direct me to a nice organ arrangement of "Sweet, Sweet > Spirit"? >> Thanks in advance to anyone who can help. >> Thurletta Brown-Gavins >> >> > ***************************************************************** > * >> >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & > related topics >> >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> >> List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >> >> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >> >> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >> >>  
(back) Subject: French theatre organs From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 08:18:51 -0700 (PDT)   Hello,   Well, let's see now.   Big, wide flute sounds.   Lots of colourful mutations.   Snappy trumpets   I don't think Voxes were terribly French Baroque (are they?), but I thought I'd just mention them because they are so gorgeous on Wurlitzer organs.   The Cornet combination is easy to achieve on a Wurlitzer.   As for the "Bass Trumpet" tunes, they don't come much more hair-raisingly French than Wurlitzer Party Horns.   It's all about colour and tuneful dialogue, rather than the clarity required of contrapuntal music from other countries, and theatre organs have colour in abundance.   Recit de Cromorne....well....OK, the Clarinets are a bit fat in tone, but then, there's the Kinura and Flute combination, which sounds good enough.   What about those French "cuckoo" pieces?   If you can find a Christie organ with the right rank, you can have a whole flock of the darned things.   Of course, when it's all over, you can ring the bells during mass and even suggest the rushing wind of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. Believe me, you haven't played a Daquin "Noel" until you've used the Sleigh Bells!!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK (where WE invented the theatre organ ;-)       --- Paul Smith <kipsmith@getgoin.net> wrote: > What typical theater sounds are closer to authentic > French Baroque than the > orchestral voices were? Now I am curious...       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Easier than ever with enhanced search. Learn more. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Re: French theatre organs From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 11:29:18 EDT   The Voix Humaine was DEFINITELY part of the French organ from the 16th =   century onward. It is one of the oldest voices in the organ, as the = vibrating reed had to come before the development of various resonator forms. One of the many difficulties with this glib discussion remains, of course, that mutations yanked off a unit Tibia via a relay and stop = switches is hardly the same as a Grand Jeu composed of methodically scaled Cornets and =   independent choruses of trumpets. The cinema organ has no diapason chorus-work, the flutes are hardly = what one would find in the French baroque organ, and the occasional bright = trumpet on 15" pressure does not a French organ make. However, some Robert-Morton strings make some very convincing 1880s French voix celestes.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/ ..  
(back) Subject: Re: French theatre organs From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Thu, 21 Apr 2005 10:54:42 -0500   Thanks - I love it! Maybe I could find French Baroque music interesting after all.     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, April 21, 2005 10:18 AM Subject: French theatre organs     > Hello, > > Well, let's see now. > > Big, wide flute sounds. > > Lots of colourful mutations. > > Snappy trumpets > > I don't think Voxes were terribly French Baroque (are > they?), but I thought I'd just mention them because > they are so gorgeous on Wurlitzer organs. > > The Cornet combination is easy to achieve on a > Wurlitzer. > > As for the "Bass Trumpet" tunes, they don't come much > more hair-raisingly French than Wurlitzer Party Horns. > > It's all about colour and tuneful dialogue, rather > than the clarity required of contrapuntal music from > other countries, and theatre organs have colour in > abundance. > > Recit de Cromorne....well....OK, the Clarinets are a > bit fat in tone, but then, there's the Kinura and > Flute combination, which sounds good enough. > > What about those French "cuckoo" pieces? > > If you can find a Christie organ with the right rank, > you can have a whole flock of the darned things. > > Of course, when it's all over, you can ring the bells > during mass and even suggest the rushing wind of the > Holy Spirit at Pentecost. Believe me, you haven't > played a Daquin "Noel" until you've used the Sleigh > Bells!! > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK (where WE invented the theatre organ > ;-) > > > > --- Paul Smith <kipsmith@getgoin.net> wrote: >> What typical theater sounds are closer to authentic >> French Baroque than the >> orchestral voices were? Now I am curious... > > > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Mail - Easier than ever with enhanced search. Learn more. > http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250 > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >