PipeChat Digest #5306 - Saturday, April 30, 2005
 
Tough Material
  by "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net>
Re: Organs and denominations
  by <AGODRDANB@aol.com>
Re: wrong spelling----- Ailments and malmots
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: How many ranks before a Wurlitzer becomes an organ?
  by "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net>
Robert Lind - 3 three Preludes and Fugues MP3 files available
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: Organs and denominations
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com>
RE: The Pan Flute is not an Organ
  by "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com>
Chris Howerter- a Winner
  by "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: How many ranks before a Wurlitzer becomes an organ?
  by "Maurits Lamers" <maurits@weidestraat.nl>
 

(back) Subject: Tough Material From: "Nathan Smith" <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2005 22:26:19 -0400   Hi List,   You're quite right, Jim, there is some polylon out there that might as well be perflex. However, there were a few different flavors of polylon, the pale yellow, bright yellow, and some others; plus the new purple stuff. I think the bright yellow is the good material. We have some 20+ year old yellow stuff installed on all sorts of things from Noack mechanical pedal unit fulcrum motors on very light pressure, to a 73 note Swell primary that puts in 40+ hours per week on 10" pressure, and it still looks as good as new!   Best,   Nate    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs and denominations From: <AGODRDANB@aol.com> Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:53:27 EDT   Mr Burt you are right on the mark when you say that some of = the CCM may in 20 years or so become classic. However isn't it a pity that so much of the current crop is dreck and drivel! I particularly detest one popular piece of "music" that I hear =   often on Christian radio, and I apologize that I have repressed it's title, but you may =   know it, a recurring refrain tells of the rocks and trees = clapping their hands! (From what planet may I ask?) It is so sad to see so many churches pandering to the lowest =   common denominator, in an attempt, perhaps to increase = membership. I am admittedly a dinasour, But as a classicly oriented church =   organist I think many congregations are down grading the music, = that to me is such an important part of worship! ( Apologies to all, I have disabled my spell check by accident = so please excuse the interesting spelling, As a card carrying Dinasour I = am the product of the phonetic school of spelling!) Regards to all Dr. Dan  
(back) Subject: Re: wrong spelling----- Ailments and malmots From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2005 21:07:46 -0700   .....give me a few days and I'll tell ya   BTW, you can make the Austin sound better than it is - I've heard you do = it!   <G>   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   > more recently it has become a list of misspelled words........or all > sorts in all sorts of places. > > So, Jonathan, how goes the Demi? Is it time for me to order it? > > Will it sound grand on my disastrous Austin? > > dale in Florida > >       -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: How many ranks before a Wurlitzer becomes an organ? From: "Walter Greenwood" <walterg@nauticom.net> Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2005 00:35:55 -0400   One.        
(back) Subject: Robert Lind - 3 three Preludes and Fugues MP3 files available From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2005 22:10:04 -0700   Dear fellow organophiles,   With pleasure I announce the availability of Robert Lind's 3 Preludes and Fugues you may access the mp3 dowmloads at: http://www.evensongmusic.net/lindorgan.html   I'm thrilled to have Bob's music on the Evensong site - it's well-written and very usable for service music and recital alike   Enjoy!   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs and denominations From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis.jan@gmail.com> Date: Fri, 29 Apr 2005 22:32:42 -0700   Would it be a correct assumption that the song in question is "Go Out With Joy" (Joe & Leila Huerta)? Twenty-one years old...   Isaiah 55:12 (KJV) "For ye shall go out with joy, and be led forth with peace: the mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands."   If it weren't biblical, it might be of more concern.=20   Musically, eh... there's plenty better.       On 4/29/05, AGODRDANB@aol.com <AGODRDANB@aol.com> wrote: > =20 > Mr Burt you are right on the mark when you say that some of = the > CCM may in 20 years or so become classic.=20 > However isn't it a pity that so much of the current crop is= =20 > dreck and drivel!=20 > I particularly detest one popular piece of "music" that I hear= =20 > often on Christian radio,=20 > and I apologize that I have repressed it's title, but you may= =20 > know it, a recurring refrain tells of the rocks and trees clapp= ing > their hands! (From what planet may I ask?)=20 > It is so sad to see so many churches pandering to the lowest= =20 > common denominator, in an attempt, perhaps to increase membership.= =20 > I am admittedly a dinasour, But as a classicly oriented church= =20 > organist I think many congregations are down grading the music,= =20 > that to me is such an important part of worship!=20 > =20 > ( Apologies to all, I have disabled my spell check by accident= =20 > so please=20 > excuse the interesting spelling, As a card carrying Dinasour I = am=20 > the product of the phonetic school of spelling!)=20 > Regards to all=20 > Dr. Dan=20     --=20 Jan Nijhuis nijhuis.jan@gmail.com  
(back) Subject: RE: The Pan Flute is not an Organ From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2005 08:15:20 +0100   For a good definition of exactly what a pipe organ is, and a fine description of almost every other aspect of the history and construction = of pipe organs, go to: http://panther.bsc.edu/~jhcook/OrgHist/begin.htm   Will Light Coventry UK   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of TubaMagna@aol.com Sent: 29 April 2005 15:24 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: The Pan Flute is not an Organ   AND WHERE IS THIS DISCUSSION GOING?   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Chris Howerter- a Winner From: "Malcolm Wechsler" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2005 04:33:22 -0400           Chris Howerter - A Winner       Profile/Review       Dear Listers and Others,       When I was a student at Oberlin in the 50s, chasing Mr. Dewey and his Decimals around the stacks of the Carnegie Library, I came across a = treasure trove that proved to be something of a time machine, taking me back about = 50 years in no time at all. The Diapason began publishing in 1909, and every month's issue was there in the stacks to be savored. Then, and even still = in the 50s, an Organist's expectations were rather different from those of today. Then, there would always be a church position, or a post teaching Organ in a university. Not in our time! Very few bright young musicians = want to seek out the great aesthetic rewards available in the study of our instrument, knowing those will likely be the only rewards they will ever earn. I suppose it has to be said that the number of living or "viable" churches and the numbers of people in them are all sadly much reduced = since 1909 and even since the 50s.       There are bright spots, young people who have the knowledge and understanding of the wonder and majesty of our instrument, and the energy = to pursue this. It's Chris Howerter who comes to mind right now, as he has = just won the (Fairfield West - CT) chapter competition in the National Young Artists Competition in Organ Playing. He now goes on to play in the = Hartford Regional Convention this summer. The surprising truth about this is that both he and the winner in Hartford had no competition - they were playing = to the judges, who judged them both clearly worthy of a first place. How sad = it is that there were no other young Organists out there to compete. In any case, on good authority, I have it that Chris played wonderfully well - on =   an elderly Moller at First Congregational Church in Waterbury, CT. His program included the Reger Introduction and Passacaglia; Bach Schmuecke = Dich and the big Bach Wir Glauben. His chosen hymn was Wondrous Love, and he finished with the Durufle Veni Creator Variations. I do wish I could have been there. I'll certainly be in Hartford for the competition at the Regional Convention.       I suppose I have known Chris for a couple of years, since he began = commuting from Pennsylvania to the university down the hill here in Danbury, Western =   CT State University, to study with Dr. Stephen Roberts. He has now moved here, has a good church position in nearby Bethel, and is doing his time = on the Organ bench - lots of time. I went over to Storrs in May last year to hear him play brilliantly and take first place in the Cameron Johnson Memorial Competition. Earlier that year (2004), Chris had already won the Charlotte Hoyt Bagnall competition in February, and the M. Louise Miller Competition in April. I could not hear either of those. In four months, Chris won three competitions, which makes for a rather nice record, don't you think?       Well, temporarily in a "does anyone care about the Organ anymore" kind of funk, thinking back to all the optimism expressed in those early = Diapasons, and contrasting it with our present prospects, I was intrigued that here = is a young student firmly fixed on the goal of developing a solid Organ = playing skill, and expecting to have a good church position, and a career as a recitalist. He has no question about any of this, and is making sure to = keep his part of the bargain by working *very* hard at it. When I saw that he = was presenting what he called a "High School Graduation Recital," I was duly impressed. A high school student bucking the trend, and announcing to all that he was an Organist, and was making this his career. The recital was = at St. John's Lutheran Church in Allentown, PA, and I took to the road to be there to hear it.       Chris began his study at the piano, of course, and that very early, like = at age 4! He was taught then by his mother. It was Diane Bish's programs of recitals on some of the great Organs of the world that caught his = interest. Score one for Diane. At the age of 14, he began serious Organ study with Michael Krentz, and later with Stephen Williams at St. John's, Allentown, where the graduation recital took place. He played publicly in AGO = members' recitals, and at AGO conventions with the Association of Young Organists (2001 Region 3, and the 2002 National). About two years ago, he played an earlier full recital at St. John's Lutheran in Allentown. In November of 2003, he began his first church position, at St. John's Lutheran Church in =   Bethlehem (PA).       This article is repaying an old debt to myself. I promised myself that I wanted to write about this 18 year old Organist and the very ambitious program he dared to play at high school graduation time. He won that dare = in spades, and I want to say a few words about that concert. Impressed as I = was with the playing, there were other extra-musical things that struck me. = One was simply the fact that he had engineered the entire venture. There was = an excellent crowd, presumably some from his church, some from St. John's, = and friends from his high school, plus some family members. I was pleased to = see that the members of the host church were providing a reception after the concert, with refreshments. There was an excellent printed program, also done by Chris himself. Above and beyond all that was Chris's manner in welcoming everyone and in addressing the audience during the recital. He = was then, at the age of 18, a true and confident professional, connecting well =   with his substantial audience both in word and deed! Now, on to the real business at hand - an Organ recital!       The program began with the Bach Fantasia and Fugue in C Minor, BWV 537, a glorious and solemn work, played by a young performer who perfectly well understood and maintained such a long-sustained solemnity. Even the Fugue, =   with a somewhat cheerful subject, requires again a certain well-controlled =   gravitas. This was a fine performance in all ways. I love the piece, and loved how it was played on this occasion.       I am not sure if Chris was yet full-time at the university, and was able = to take part in the Organ students' trip to Paris in I think, 2003. I could = ask him, but it is 3 a.m., and I had best not phone either him or his teacher right now. I hope he had a chance to play the next work on the program on the great Cavaille-Coll at San Sulpice. If not, it will happen at another time. He played for us the Franck Prelude, Fugue and Variation, the = prelude with a fine lyricism, the Fugue and Adagio with a gentle sense of drama, = and the variation again with sensitivity to the wonderful long line of melody, =   while making effortless work of the filigree work of the variation. It was =   truly fine.       And now for somebody completely different! Well, what I mean is that a = whole new side of Chris now came to light and to life, for the next two pieces. Alfred Hollins's intricate and clever response to a request for a piece in =   the style of Handel was "A Trumpet Minuet." Chris's performance was full = of the English dignity and sparkle required here. I mention every once in a while that he ought to play Hollins's "A Song of Sunshine." Perhaps the title is a bit off-putting to some. I have to confess that after hearing this piece for the first time, at the hands of David Liddle, no one was = safe around me for at least a week. I could hardly stop humming and whistling = the tune. (David has recorded on Priory an entire CD of Hollins on the Organ = in the City Hall of the City in which Hollins grew up - Hull.) I hope that Chris might yet find this gem and add it to his repertoire.       Chris heaped additional British glory on himself in a wonderful = performance of "Processional," written by William Mathias in 1964. It wants a = particular Cathedral Organist's flare to pull off pieces like this, and Chris = certainly has it, and he certainly did it.       Next, we met the lush Chris (not Chris the lush! Heaven forefend!) He gave =   us a most wonderful performance of the . . . well, lush Andante Sostenuto from the Widor Symphonie Gothique. In the great sweep of its richness, it did not bog down, but had a splendid forward motion that swept us all = along in its grandeur. A fabulous performance.       I suspect I am not alone in knowing certain performers that I associate always with their particular perfection in performing a certain piece. I think of Cameron Carpenter's Middelschulte "Perpetuum Mobile" as one = example of such linkage. I have heard Chris several times now in performances of = the Dialogue for Mixtures from Suite Breve of Langlais, and I think this has perhaps reached the point of being a bit of a signature tune for him. He does it with all the panache it wants, and it rather brought down the = house at this recital, almost literally, I feared, when I heard the last chords = on the <en chamade> tucked up under the roof. It may well also be that = another possible type of signature tune for him will be the Mathias and other = works of its ilk.       The Langlais required of Chris an encore. He would not be allowed to go without one, and he gave us something he had learned long ago - the = Trumpet Tune that David German wrote for his own wedding.       There was much happy chatter around the punch bowl, and all went home = happy, including me, pleased to see a student who is unwaveringly devoting his = life to the instrument we all love.       Malcolm Wechsler   www.mander-organs.com                                              
(back) Subject: Re: How many ranks before a Wurlitzer becomes an organ? From: "Maurits Lamers" <maurits@weidestraat.nl> Date: Sat, 30 Apr 2005 11:00:16 +0200     On 29-apr-05, at 18:10, Colin Mitchell wrote:   > If John Compton invented (?) a Cello register, which > used a spinning disc, electric fingering and a real > cello string; does it qualify as electrical, digital > or authentic?   If the possibilities are only these three, I would go for authentic.   In my opinion electrical is the analogue way of generating sound using synthesizing techniques as frequency modulation or amplitude modulation (FM and AM), the way electrical organs work.   Digital is the computerized generation of sound, using samples or a digital representation of the analogue synthesizing techniques.   The way you describe is the way in which older mechanical instruments work, as you can hear and see at: http://www.museumspeelklok.nl/speelklok/uk/collection.html (Click Hupfeld violin player)   So if you want it completely strict, maybe best to call it electro-mechanical ?   greets   Maurits