PipeChat Digest #5138 - Friday, February 4, 2005
 
Organ study tour of the Netherlands and North Germany (part two; cross po
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
Re: Swell Reed Battery
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Swell Reed Battery
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Organist and hymns
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Moody Church Organ
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Swell Reed Battery
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: Swell Reed Battery
  by "jonkroepel" <jonkroepel@insightbb.com>
Re: Swell Reed Battery
  by "jonkroepel" <jonkroepel@insightbb.com>
Re: Pet Peeve
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
Dennis James - Seattle Paramount February silents start Monday
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Re: Swell Reed Battery
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Moody Church Organ
  by "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org>
Re: Swell Reed Battery
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Organ study tour of the Netherlands and North Germany (part two; cross posted) From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 17:42:16 -0800 (PST)   First of all, let me thank Michael Barone, Dick Sanderman, Martin van der = Horst, and Chris Bragg for pointing out my error about the organ in the = Concergebouw. As I wrote, I wasn't sure who built it, and sure enough, I = was incorrect. I also made another error: my student, Juan Mesa, and = Chris Bragg himself reminded me that the piece that Chris performed for = Pieter Van Dijk's organ class was not by Samuel Scheidt. It was the first = five versets of Matthias Weckmann's very long and elaborate setting of "Es = ist das Heil". In case I needed any further confimation, this was proof = positive of what I had feared: senility is indeed setting in! :) On Thursday, January 13, we took the train from Amsterdam's Centraal = Station to Alkmaar. We explored the old city, which like most old cities = in the Netherlands, has almost as many canals as streets. Alkmaar was the = center of the cheese making industry, and much cheese is still produced in = this area. In the summer the traditional cheese market is held on = Fridays, with the weighing and testing of cheeses done by people in = traditional Dutch costumes. This is staged as a tourist gimmick, of = course, and it is very popular. We saw the old cheese makers' guild hall = in the center of town. Like many of the old buildings in this part of = Europe, it is made of brick, as is the Grote Kerk. In the late afternoon we made our way back to the church, where Pieter Van = Dijk was scheduled to give my students a master class from 5:00 to 7:00 = p.m. Our lessons were to be on the two historic organs of the church. = The small organ, built by Jan Van Covelens (Johann von Koblenz) in 1511, = is one of the few surviving organs in Gothic style in Europe. The = Renaissance came late to Northern Europe, and this little organ still has = the crockets and finials of a Gothic style case. Another Gothic feature = is its location in a "swallow's nest" balcony in a side aisle of the choir = of the church. According to what Pieter told us, originally there were = two organs facing one another on either side of the choir, but the other = organ had been removed when the large organ had been installed in the west = gallery in the 17th. century. In fact this little organ, a precious = survival from the early period of Dutch organ building, survived only = because it was used when the large organ was under repair, or wasn't being used for some other reason. The organ was originally one = manual, with the pipes divided over two wind chests. The lower chest = contained the so-called "Principael", which is the plenum of the main = manual. This harks back to the old Blockwerk of medieval organs. The = upper chest contained the flute stops. It is clear, therefore, that the = flutes and principals were not intended to be used together. The stops of = the "principael" contain many doubled ranks. As one goes higher in the = compass, the more pipes there are per note on each individual rank. = There is a beautiful book published by GOART called <ECHO: European Cities = of Historic Organs> which contains a detailed description of the historic = organs of a number of cities. Alkmaar is included in this list; there is = a fine essay on the organs of Alkmaar in this book. Pieter Van Dijk wrote = the essay, and there are splendid photos of the organs. The book is = available from OHS, by the way. Here is a timeline synopsis of the history of the small organ that appears in the beginning = of the essay: 1511? Built by Jan Van Covelens 1545 addition of Borstwerk by Claes Willemsz 1551 addition of Pedaaltrompet by Allart Claesz 1625 restoration and alteration by Jan Jacobsz of Lin 1630 new wind supply by Levijn Eekman 1651 restoration and alteration by Jacobus van Hagerbeer 1703-1704 restoration by Johannes Duytschot 1894 restoration and alteration by L. Ypma & Co. 1939 restoration and alteration by H.W. Flentrop 1994-2000 restoration and alteration by Flentrop Orgelbouw restoration of the organcase by Willem Haakma-Wagenaar The organ has the old F compasses typical of early Dutch organs, so it = begins with F in the bass octave. There is no F# or G# in the lowest = fifth of the compass; that is very disorienting for the player. Pieter = suggested that everyone depend on their sense of feel to find the lowest = notes in the bass, for if one looks, one becomes very confused with the = missing sharps. The manual compass goes up to a2. As we discovered, one = must make some changes when playing even some of Sweelinck's keyboard = music, but they were changes that Sweelinck himself must have made if = playing his variation cycles on the organ: the Niehoff organ that = Sweelinck had in the Oude Kerk in Amsterdam is thought to have had the = same manual compasses as the small organ in Alkmaar. Niehoff was an = apprentice of Jan Van Covelens, by the way. As is the case with the few = Gothic organs that survive, the tone of this little organ is quite strong. = The doubling of the principals makes each register have a distinct character. There is an especially beautiful Openfluit 4' on this organ, = which has a unique sound. The organ is tuned in meantone, and the pitch = is a1=3D427 Hz. As in many old Dutch organs, there are large doors = attached to each side of the case. The large organ in the west gallery is housed in a spectacular case = designed by Jacob Van Campen. As stated earlier, the case is in a = classical style and is very tall and slender. The painter, Caesar van = Everdingen, was commissioned to make an elaborate painting on the outside = of the hinged doors of the case; the subject of this painting is "The = triumph of King Saul after David has defeated Goliath". In 1638 the organ = builder Levijn Eekman had been commissioned to combine the two little = organs in the choir (including the 1511 instrument described above) into a = new organ for the gallery, but he died before the work could be = accomplished. The next year the van Hagerbeer family of organ builders = was commissioned to build an entirely new instrument, which resulted in = the instrument we see today. Here is a timeline synopsis of the history = of the organ: 1639-46 Organ built by Galtus and his sons, Germer and Jacobus van = Hagerbeer 1652-53 major changes by Jacobus van Hagerbeer 1685/1704 minor changes by Roelof Barentsz and his son, Johannes = Duytschot 1722-25 rebuilding of the organ in North German style by Frans Caspar = Schnitger 1781-1782 restoration by Johannes Strumphler 1823 restoration by A. van Gruisen 1843-44 restoration by D. S. Ypma 1854 restoration by C.F.A. Naber 1897-98 restoration by J.Fr. Witte 1947-49 restoration by D.A. Flentrop 1982-86 restoration by Flentrop Orgelbouw The organ has three manuals: I. Rugpositief; II. Groot Manual; III. = Bovenwerk. Originally the pedal as built by the van Hagerbeer family was = the old "Brabant" type: three stops, Prestant 8, Octav 4, and Trompet 8, = mostly for cantus firmus work; the compass of those stops was C-f1. The lower part of the Pedaal was attached to the "Groot Manual" (then = called "Hoofdwerk") which then had a 24' F compass, as in Leiden = Pieterskerk (more about that organ in the next installment). Frans Caspar = Schnitger enlarged the Pedal 13 stops and made it into a completely = independent division, as in the large North German instruments. The organ = is tuned in equal temperament; this decision was based on a misreading of = the source material about this organ. It is now believed that the organ = was originally tuned in a modified meantone temperament. The pitch of the = organ is low: a1=3D415 Hz; the wind pressure is a moderate 76 mm. A = complete stoplist of this organ, as well as of the 1511 Jan van Covelens = instrument, made be found in the Osiris archive. Pieter Van Dijk arrived promptly at 5:00 to begin the master class. All = four of my students had learned both a work of Sweelinck and a work of = Buxtehude for the two master classes that Pieter Van Dijk gave us. We = used both organs for the classes: the 1511 organ for the Sweelinck works, = and the van Hagerbeer/Schnitger for the Buxtehude works. Pieter asked = each student how he conceived the piece before selecting the registration. = He had each student play each work completely through before having them = go through the work again section by section. We were all struck by what = imaginative use Pieter made of the resources of each instrument, and how = perfectly suited each registration seemed for the work or section being = played. The students quickly learned that one has to play slower on such = organs in an acoustic such as that at Alkmaar. They also found that they = had to increase the amount of space between sections, and play with a = looser touch (more detached) than they do elsewhere. They also found that plenum registrations on both the Groot Manual (HW) = and Rugpositief are quite grave; that of the Groot Manual is especially = so, and founded on 16' pitch. On the RP the 5 1/3 appears rather low in = the compass of the Mixture, and it brings the gravity of the 16' pitch = series into the sound. Only on the Bovenwerk is it possible to build up a = plenum based solely on 8' pitch. The ideas about registration that one = has formed from playing neo-baroque organs fly right out the window, when = one plays an organ like Alkmaar! There has been a good bit of discussion about the actions of these = instruments on the various lists in the past several months. The touch on = the big Alkmaar organ is a bit heavy, though not extremely so. When one = uses couplers, the touch can get quite formidable, especially when one = plays on the RP with all couplers. Pieter Van Dijk believes that one = should use arm weight when playing an organ like that, and I believe that = he's absolutely right. To my knowledge the use of arm weight is never = discussed in any old treatise before 1800, but Pieter Van Dijk believes = that organists used it anyway. One must remember that early treatises = were discussing harpsichord or clavichord technique, and were addressed = primarily to amateurs. Organists on the other hand were a professional, = elite class of musicians; they had no need of such explanations, and would = have learned technique from other organists, who were also highly trained = professional musicians. Pieter had some very practical suggestions concerning tempo relationships, = fingering and registration in the music of Sweelinck. It is his belief = that the tempi in all of the variations of a Sweelinck variation cycle = should remain the same. The students played their Sweelinck works on the = little 1511 Van Covelens organ, which seemed virtually ideal for this = literature. Pieter's suggestions for registrations also seemed perfectly = suited for the affect and character of each variation. Unfortunately we = weren't able to use the hand pumping mechanism, because there was a = problem with it when we were there. This little organ is loud! Every = stop could be heard very clearly all throughout the church, and in the = choir the sound was amazingly powerful. Pieter Van Dijk has some ideas about Buxtehude that are rather different = from those of Harald Vogel. It is Pieter's contention that the main = surprise in the "Stylus phantasticus" is in the length of the rests. I = must say that in Alkmaar's grand acoustic and on that very grand organ, = this idea was very convincing. Pieter played the toccata passages of = Buxtehude praeludia a bit more strictly than does Harald Vogel, it seemed = to me. He also didn't seem to advocate the idea of playing a lot of = ornaments on the final chord of a big praeludium, as Vogel sometimes does. = I have heard both men play, and both approaches are convincing in their = own way. Mind you: Pieter had the greatest respect for Vogel and his = scholarship. He suggested that we run out and buy Vogel's new Sweelinck = edition when it comes out. We had to content ourselves with Dover for the = moment, though the students had made some corrections and emendations from = the fine new Belotti/Broude edition of Buxtehude's free works. The classes were scheduled for two hours, and went on for nearly four! = Pieter really got wound up, and he seemed to have boundless energy and = limitless enthusiasm for the music at hand. My students all ended the two = sessions very excited about the experience, and what they learned will = stay with them for a lifetime, I think. The combination of playing two = of the greatest historic organs extant, great music that was ideally = suited to those organs, and classes by a master teacher are a combination = that is hard to beat. Stephen Roberts Western CT State University, Danbury, CT USA Next installment: Haarlem St. Bavo and Leiden Pieterskerk          
(back) Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 21:01:19 EST   >Is'nt a complete swell battery 16, 8, 8, 8, 4? of >course the chorus would usually be the 16,8,4 long >resonator reeds. I've been out of town for the past week, so I'm just getting around to reading these emails...   I've never heard anyone call a reed chorus the "battery," I've always = heard it referred to as the reed chorus. As to the numerical description, that really doesn't serve any purpose. Look at how many organs there are that have reed choruses that are = something like the following: 16' Dulzian, 8' Schalmei, 4' Clarion. That's 16, 8, = 4, but I'd hardly call it a complete chorus. Your listing of 16, 8, 8, 8, 4 could be many things...I'm trying to figure out what the three 8' stops = are: Trumpet, Oboe and Vox? Trumpet, Oboe, Cor d'Amour? Trumpet, French = Trumpet, Hautbois? What about the 16 and the 4. The 16 could be a Basson, a = Waldhorn, a Fagott, a Petite Bombarde, a Contra Trompette, a Double Trumpet or a = plethora of other reeds. The 4' could be an Oboe Schalmei, a Clarion, or even an extension of the 16' reed. There are variables as to the school of = organbuilding, the era in which the instrument was built, and even who the consultant was--bottom line, there is no such thing as "it is always this way."   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 18:11:25 -0800 (PST)   Reed Chorus yes. But yes, I have even heard organ-builders use Swell "battery"   When I mention a complete battery, or chorus im thinking somehing along the lines os 16 Trumpette 8 Trumpette 8 Oboe 8 Vox 4 Clarion   Something like 16 Doucaine, 8 Bombarde, 4 Schalmei would not really be a reed chorus, would it?       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Re: Organist and hymns From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 21:27:49 EST   >Random blurbs on this post: > >At my church, they are used to certain things. Some things they did not = have for a long >time until I brought them back. These include the Choir processing, interludes during the >procession, etc. > >They are wonderful at singing hymns and very confident with it. They know =   exactly when >Im going to do something, and they know when to come back in = after 30-60 seconds of >fanfares during "National Hymn" (LOL that was FUN yesterday). > >One thing I learned while in an assistantship...never go with the singers...they will certainly >drag. > >As Justin said, a fine organist leads with good skill.   A good musician uses taste and restraint when leading hymns. A church service is NOT about bringing attention to the organist, but about many = things including 1. praising God through the hymns and music, 2. inspiring the congregation to sing, 3. knowing how not to cross the line between = worship/ministry and performance.   There is nothing wrong with interludes and modulations, fancy = introductions, descants, and alternate harmonizations, but they have to be done in good = taste and they can't be done all the time on every hymn. A 60 second fanfare is =   just obscene in my book. I'm all about some drama in a church service, = and I love some "flash and trash," but that even goes overboard for me. Even = the things I do in a church service do not draw attention to my skills as an = organist, but to add excitement for the worshippers. I find that restraint, leaving =   them wanting a little more, just as in a recital, is the key. Never in = any book of preprinted interludes or modulations would you find a one minute fanfare--it's a gross misuse of the organ, purely to draw attention to the = musician. It just says "hey, look at me, listen to what I can do (or can't do)". I = would guess that most congregations would benefit and enjoy a few short = interludes between verses if a procession is running long, because it gives them a = break to catch their breath. After a minute of not singing and listening to the =   organist go crazy on their 15 or 18 rank organ (when maybe two ranks are = manual reeds and a couple ranks are celestes, you've really got yourself a = veritable fanfare extraviganza opportunity!) the congregation is so "over" the whole =   sonic experience they don't want to sing and the worship experience has = been ruined. An organist's job is to lead hymn singing not squelch it. An = organist is supposed to enhance worship not disrupt it.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Moody Church Organ From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 21:32:33 EST   >The original organ is a four-manual dating from the 1920's. Around the = late 1980's or so >the console caught on fire! The insurance money paid for a = new console and renovations >to the entire instrument.   I thought that there was a fire in the church or something to that effect = and what saved the pipes was the fact that the organ was accidentally left on = and that the expression shoes were all closed, so the pipes were all saved because the boxes were closed. This may just be an "urban legend."   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 21:57:52 EST   Does "long resonator" reeds refer to normal, full-length reeds, or to harmonic, double-length resonators? Or the rare triple harmonic reeds? Any = way you slice it, I've never heard the term.  
(back) Subject: Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 22:00:54 EST   Then there's my personal yacht, also built in the H&W yards in Belfast. It is the fourth sister, the one never mentioned in the history books. The R.M.S. Pedantic.   SMG  
(back) Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery From: "jonkroepel" <jonkroepel@insightbb.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 21:10:00 -0600   What in the heck would vox humana in a reed chorus? I wouldn't at least.   Jon Kroepel ----- Original Message ----- From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 04, 2005 8:11 PM Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery     > Reed Chorus yes. > But yes, I have even heard organ-builders use Swell > "battery" > > When I mention a complete battery, or chorus im > thinking somehing along the lines os > 16 Trumpette > 8 Trumpette > 8 Oboe > 8 Vox > 4 Clarion > > Something like 16 Doucaine, 8 Bombarde, 4 Schalmei > would not really be a reed chorus, would it? > > > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more. > http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250 > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > > -- > No virus found in this incoming message. > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. > Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.8.5 - Release Date: 2/3/2005 > >     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.8.5 - Release Date: 2/3/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery From: "jonkroepel" <jonkroepel@insightbb.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 21:12:13 -0600   Why in the heck would one use a vox humana in a reed chorus? I wouldn't.   Jon Kroepel   ----- Original Message ----- From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 04, 2005 8:11 PM Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery     > Reed Chorus yes. > But yes, I have even heard organ-builders use Swell > "battery" > > When I mention a complete battery, or chorus im > thinking somehing along the lines os > 16 Trumpette > 8 Trumpette > 8 Oboe > 8 Vox > 4 Clarion > > Something like 16 Doucaine, 8 Bombarde, 4 Schalmei > would not really be a reed chorus, would it? > > > > > __________________________________ > Do you Yahoo!? > Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more. > http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250 > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > > > > -- > No virus found in this incoming message. > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. > Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.8.5 - Release Date: 2/3/2005 > >     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.8.5 - Release Date: 2/3/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Pet Peeve From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 22:16:13 -0500   It is one of mine too. I am appalled at the bad spelling and grammar as well as carelessness in other real estate agents' descriptions in their listings on the Multiple Listing Service. I could mention a couple of = good ones but it would be too OFF TOPIC!!!   =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions: "There let the pealing organ blow, To the full-voiced choir below, In service high, and anthems clear, As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes". John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).   Merry Foxworth Open Door Realty Boston, MA 02131 617 469-4888 x207 877 865-1703 toll free http://www.opendoorrlty.com/ ----- Original Message ----- From: <RMB10@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Sunday, September 05, 2004 4:35 AM Subject: Pet Peeve     > With this talk of St. Ignatius, NYC, only one person (Sebastian), has > managed to spell the name one of the former organs in the church = properly. The > church had a Rodgers with a Ruffatti augmented Great division. I probably sound > like I'm whining, but why is it so hard for people to spell Ruffatti = (two > f's and two t's) correctly? People hardly ever even spell Rodgers = (with a d) > correctly, either. Call me the spelling nazi, but correct grammar and > spelling are pet peeves of mine. > > Thank you for listening to me gripe. > > Monty Bennett > waiting for our new Ruffatti to come in 2006.... > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Dennis James - Seattle Paramount February silents start Monday From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 22:26:25 EST   The Paramount Theatre (Seattle) Silent Movie Mondays Series turns to romanc= e=20 this month with "Sunrise," "Love," "Male and Female" and "Piccadilly." The=20 opener, Monday, February 7 at 7 p.m., is F. W. Murnau's "Sunrise," the stor= y=20 of a farmer (George O'Brien) who, seduced by a temptress from the city=20 (Margaret Livingston), decides to kill his wife (Janet Gaynor). The hauntin= gly=20 beautiful film won Oscars for "artistic quality," cinematography and acting= =20 (Gaynor). It will be followed on Valentine's Day with "Love," with off-scre= en=20 lovers Greta Garbo and John Gilbert starring in a updated version of Tolsto= y=E2=80=99s=20 "Anna Karenina." On February 21, Gloria Swanson stars in "Male and Female,"= =20 Cecil B. DeMille's comedy about a boating party of aristocrats marooned on=20= a=20 desert island and the butler who becomes their master. The series winds up =20 February 28 with "Piccadilly," a tale of murder in a London nightclub starri= ng Anna=20 May Wong. All the films will be accompanied by Dennis James playing the =20 Paramount's historic Mighty Wurlitzer theatre pipe organ. They screen at 7 p= ..m. =20 after introductory remarks by James. Tickets are $9.50 at the Paramount and=20= =20 Moore Theatre box offices, _www.theparamount.com_ (http://www.theparamount.c= om/)=20 and Ticketmaster.   Listing sent from:=20   Silent Film Concerts PO Box 2072 Tacoma, Washington 98401-2072 USA 253-573-1683  
(back) Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 11:35:05 +0800   In all the reading I have done a "battery" was the name given to a set of high powered reeds at one or more pitches, as on Spanish organs. I guess = the 16,8,4 trumpets (or horns or cornopeans) on a swell organ would fit the = name as also would the 16,8 and 4 chorus and solo reeds on Great or Solo. I couldn't see a swell Oboe fitting into the battery. The name is fairly common even if it is not used in the USA. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, February 05, 2005 10:11 AM Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery     > Reed Chorus yes. > But yes, I have even heard organ-builders use Swell > "battery" > > When I mention a complete battery, or chorus im > thinking somehing along the lines os > 16 Trumpette > 8 Trumpette > 8 Oboe > 8 Vox > 4 Clarion       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.8.5 - Release Date: 3/02/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Moody Church Organ From: "jch" <opus1100@catoe.org> Date: Fri, 04 Feb 2005 22:01:50 -0600   At 08:32 PM 2/4/05, you wrote:   > >The original organ is a four-manual dating from the 1920's. Around the =   > late >1980's or so >the console caught on fire! The insurance money paid for a = new >console and renovations >to the entire instrument.   The fire was caused by arson and contained mainly to the altar area. Moody =   Church is a huge building, and although the console was heavily damaged, it did not get close to the organ chambers.   jch      
(back) Subject: Re: Swell Reed Battery From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 4 Feb 2005 23:28:56 EST   In a message dated 02/04/05 10:12:16 PM, jonkroepel@insightbb.com writes:   << Why in the heck would one use a vox humana in a reed chorus? I = wouldn't.     Jon Kroepel >>   Or a "Trumpette" for that matter