PipeChat Digest #5141 - Saturday, February 5, 2005
 
Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: Trumpette
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Flu Medication????
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Trumpette
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic
  by "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Felix Hell in Iowa Feb. 13. Recital announcement
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Dennis James plays for first Silent Film Festival - San Jose California T
  by <MUSCUR@aol.com>
Re: Moody Memorial Church Organ
  by "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com>
Looking for Doug Gregory
  by "David  Wollaeger" <dpw@vance.net>
Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Moody Church Broadcasts
  by <sowerby@comcast.net>
Organs and Organists online feature David M Patrick at the IV/74 Walker o
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: Trumpette
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Moody Reuter specs (long)
  by "Millie & David Kenney" <kenn411@bellsouth.net>
box organs & casts of thousands
  by <Seedlac@aol.com>
Re: box organs & casts of thousands
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Re: continuo organ design
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
This week's MP3 - Fantasia Breve
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: continuo organ design
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
RE: continuo organ design
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Flu Medication???? Playing while ill
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 06:52:26 -0500   Hmm. My personal catamaran is a 64' Gravissima. . . It is a little uneven though, and when used alone, without another catamaran it sounds like elephants have gotten loose in the Atlantic!   (bad analogy)   Nick     On Sat, 5 Feb 2005 08:04:14 -0000, Harry Grove <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> wrote: > Strange that. Must be the sister ship to MY personal yacht. > > The problem is that I haven't seen her since she was taken out for > sea-trials by a Captain who flew over here from Holland ! > (Sorry, attempt at humour) > > Harry Grove > [a.k.a. musicman] > > Nothing separates the generations more than music. By the time a child = is > eight or nine, he has developed a passion for his own music that is even > stronger than his passions for procrastination and weird clothes. > Bill Cosby > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> > To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Sent: Saturday, February 05, 2005 3:00 AM > Subject: Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic > > > Then there's my personal yacht, also built in the H&W yards in = Belfast. > > It is the fourth sister, the one never mentioned in the history books. > > The R.M.S. Pedantic. > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     -- Nicholas F. Russotto Somers, Connecticut  
(back) Subject: Re: Trumpette From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 07:49:27 EST   >When I mention a complete battery, or chorus im >thinking somehing along the lines os >16 Trumpette >8 Trumpette >8 Oboe >8 Vox >4 Clarion   Having just recently designed a very large 5 manual organ for my church, I =   did extensive research into organ design to make sure that what I did was = not out of line. Going back through my organ building texts, some of which = date back to the 1800's, and also going back through the texts that were used = in my college courses of organ building/design, organ history, organ literature, = and also relying on my memories of organs I have played in concert and in = church (including V/205 Moller at Calvary Church, Charlotte, NC where I was = formerly the organist) I have never seen a "Trumpette." Can someone please = enlighten me as to what this rank is? I have seen, played and heard a "Trumpet", a "Trompette", a "Trompete" and even a "Trommet." (English, French, German, = old German) I have also heard and played the other cousins of trumpets--bombarde, cornopean, tromba, waldhorn, and my ever favorite "Horn."   What sort of tonal characteristics does a "Trumpette" have? Would it be something that I should have in the new organ? Is it a harmonic reed or = not? What sort of shallot does it have?   I love the "wisdom" that I can glean from the people on these = lists...there is always so much to learn. When one stops learning, it's time to hang up = the organ shoes.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Flu Medication???? From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 08:03:13 EST   >Im STILL on flu medication and it makes for drowsiness.   That is what you said last week. I hope you weren't drowsy while playing = all the fanfares on National Hymn at church--would have made for an = interesting sonic experience! LOL     Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Trumpette From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sat, 05 Feb 2005 08:59:32 -0500   There are a couple of organs in my area that have "Principle" stops -- so why not a "Trumpette"? Don't ask about the builder! Let's just say his stop lists included "Principles," but that was where principles ended.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   RMB10@aol.com wrote:   >>I have never seen a "Trumpette." Can someone please enlighten me >>as to what this rank is? I have seen, played and heard a "Trumpet", a >>"Trompette", a "Trompete" and even a "Trommet." (English, French, = German, old German) >> I have also heard and played the other cousins of trumpets--bombarde, >>cornopean, tromba, waldhorn, and my ever favorite "Horn." >>      
(back) Subject: Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic From: "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 08:03:36 -0600   Lol Gary ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 04, 2005 9:00 PM Subject: Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic     > Then there's my personal yacht, also built in the H&W yards in Belfast. > It is the fourth sister, the one never mentioned in the history books. > The R.M.S. Pedantic. > > SMG > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >  
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in Iowa Feb. 13. Recital announcement From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 15:22:00 +0100   Dear listmembers and friends,   this is to announce Felix Hell's upcoming recital in Davenport, Iowa.   First Presbyterian Church, 1702 Iowa Street Davenport, Iowa February 13, 2005, 3 p.m.   (From Moline, IL, airport it is 9.5 miles to the church)   The organ: Casavant, 4 manual, 61 ranks, op. 3455 (1980). Originally 45 ranks, the organ was refurbished, tonally revised and enlarged in 1998.   For further information please visit the church's website: www.fpcdavenport.org.   If some of you are in the area, it would be great to see you.   Program below. I hope I did not mess up the composers' dates of birth and death his time :-)   Hans-Friedrich Hell     PROGRAM   Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750 Prelude and Fugue D Major, BWV 532   Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809 - 1847) Sonata No. 3, A Major, op. 65 - Con moto maestoso - Andante tranquillo   Charles Marie Widor (1844-1937) Symphony No. 5 op. 42,1 I. Allegro vivace II. Allegro cantabile   Max Reger (1873-1916) Fantasy and Fugue on B-A-C-H   INTERMISSION   Marcel Dupr=E9 (1886-1971) Variations sur un Noel, op. 20 Introduction and 11 Variations   Felix-Alexandre Guilmant (1837 - 1911) Sonata No. 1 D Minor, op. 42 Introduction et Allegro Pastoral Final        
(back) Subject: Dennis James plays for first Silent Film Festival - San Jose California Theatre From: <MUSCUR@aol.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 11:27:59 EST   =20 Seeing that public announcements about the first silent film festival in Sa= n=20 Jose have begun, I am delighted to inform theatre organ fans of the special= =20 program at the beautiful, newly restored California Theatre (formerly the=20 Fox) in downtown San Jose, California on March 11 which I will be playing f= or:   OPERA SILENT FILMS =E2=80=93 A spectacular double feature at the California= Theatre,=20 where audiences will be captivated by two Opera silent film masterpieces:=20 Cecil B. DeMille=E2=80=99s =E2=80=9CCarmen=E2=80=9D starring the famous Met= ropolitan Opera star=20 Geraldine Farrar plus King Vidor=E2=80=99s =E2=80=9CLa Boheme=E2=80=9D star= ring Lillian Gish. The silent=20 films will be accompanied by yours truly on the California Theatre's Wurlit= zer=20 theatre pipe organ. =20   This event will be part of the silent film series being presented as events= =20 of the San Jose Cinequest film festival. Another series program will occur=20= on=20 March 4 featuring Harold Lloyd Films accompanied by organist Christian =20 Elliot. Both of these first silent film events presented in the newly rest= ored=20 theatre will feature the Wurlitzer organ. The organ was installed by Edwa= rd=20 Millington Stout and Richard Taylor and features the 4-manual console from=20 the Chicago Uptown Theatre. Much of the pipework is from the Palace Theatre=20= in=20 Dallas.   Closed for years and near demolition by neglect, San Jose=E2=80=99s histori= c=20 California Theatre reopened in September 2004. Its restoration designed for= both=20 live stage performances and for motion pictures, it is the new home of Oper= a San=20 Jose and Symphony Silicon Valley. For more information on the theatre, =20 including many pictures, please see: _http://shomler.com/calsj/_=20 (http://shomler.com/calsj/) , and for all of the opening silent film progra= m series events,=20 please see: http://www.cinequest.org/2005/programguide/event_view.php?eid= =3D117   California Theatre 345 South First Street San Jose, California Friday, March 11, 2005 -- 7:30 PM Program presented by the Stanford Theatre Foundation and Cinequest General Admission $10.00 Tickets may be purchased online at www.cinequest.org   All the best,   Dennis James=20    
(back) Subject: Re: Moody Memorial Church Organ From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 09:33:32 -0700   If I recall, Moody had a radio broadcast in the 60's & 70's called "Songs In The Night". Would hear it on WOR driving home from evening services. That organ as played by the organist of that time had a great sound on radio. A good string section makes for a bright and rich sound when broadcast.   I assume from the comments that the pipework of today is similar to that of 40 years ago, and only the colsole has changed.   It's good to hear that John Innis is still around. He and Bill Fasig put out some organ & piano duet LPs in that same era. They had a rich and full Gospel/Theatre Organ sound, which hasn't been duplicated since.   David E - - On Fri, 4 Feb 2005 10:45 pm, David Michael Kenney wrote: > > John Innes seems to be "the" organist at Moody.         David E   David Evangelides Fulfillment Manager International Bible Society 719-867-2729 (Sent by wireless T-Mobile Sidekick)  
(back) Subject: Looking for Doug Gregory From: "David Wollaeger" <dpw@vance.net> Date: Sat, 05 Feb 2005 11:46:26 -0500   Hello all,   I owned a Barton theatre organ and exchanged a lot of information with = Doug Gregory in Australia. The last e-mail address I have for him doesn't = work, I wonder if he's still on this list. Here is something I wanted him to = see:   http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=3D1&item=3D3780307975&ssPa= geNam   If that link doesn't work, go to eBay.com and search for "vestax rvd902" This is the reverb unit that made the Barton sound like it was in a large theatre. I sent Doug a recording and he was impressed with the sound, thought he might be interested. I would also just like to say "hello!   Thanks, David    
(back) Subject: Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 11:51:38 -0500     On Fri, 4 Feb 2005 22:00:54 EST TubaMagna@aol.com writes:   > The R.M.S. Pedantic.       Dear Seb et al:   I agree. This thread has differed quite from the one that I started.   My initial inquiry had nothing to do with the TITANIC, but that is where the thread went. The TITANIC organ has been beaten to death.   My original inquiry had to do with the fact that nearly all available data on the BRITANNIC states that the organ was never installed. The recovery crew found pipe organ parts. This is the mystery I put out there.   No one seems interested. Pity.     Jim  
(back) Subject: Moody Church Broadcasts From: <sowerby@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 05 Feb 2005 16:58:28 +0000   "Songs in the Night" may still be heard over Moody Broadcast Network on = Sunday evenings. Plenty of strings and tremolos! Check the Moody Church = website for live streaming broadcasts of Sunday services and other events.   The church is a huge Romanesque building located on Chicago's north side = at Lincoln Park. The church seats 4,000 people in auditorium style = seating with no interior columns to obstruct views. The organ chambers = are high across the front of the room. The console is at floor level = adjacent to the pulpit in full view of the congregation.
(back) Subject: Organs and Organists online feature David M Patrick at the IV/74 Walker organ in Buckfast Abbey From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 19:03:12 +0200   Our featured organist this week is       DAVID M PATRICK       David has already contributed several very fine performances to Organs and =   Organists Online, http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/   who this week is to be heard playing three movements from Widor's Fourth Symphony, the March, Adagio and Toccata, recorded on the organ of Buckfast =   Abbey in Devon. His recordings made there in 1976 of the Suite Op. 5 of Maurice Durufl=E9 and that of the Symphonie No. 6 by Louis Vierne, made in =   1978, are on the "CATHEDRAL" label, CRMS 867. David has his own website at   http://www.impulse-music.co.uk/patrick.htm To quote from The Gramophone : =   "stunning virtuosity" and BBC Music Magazine, Critic's Choice of the Year 1997 "this wonderful recording" of his performance of the complete works = of Maurice Durufle on the 4 manual Harrison organ of Coventry Cathedral. Madeleine Durufle herself congratulated David on his recording with the words ".excellent . brilliant . BRAVO!"       David first played the organ in Buckfast Abbey in 1962. Since then he has =   given several recitals there as well broadcasting for the BBC. He now = lives in Norway and is organist at Fauske. He travels widely giving recitals, recording and broadcasting and has recently made a DVD of music by Bach on =   the new 3 manual Reil organ of Stavanger Cathedral. http://www.reil.nl/doc/orgeloverzicht/stavanger.html This instrument can = be heard this summer in the hands of list member Jarle Fagerheim, who is one = of the recitalists in the Summer Series alongside such other International Players as Hans Fagius and Christopher Herrick. July 16th is the date for your diary if you are in Norway - Stavanger is joint European "Cultural Capital", sharing the honour with Liverpool in 2008.       BUCKFAST ABBEY   Buckfast is in a peaceful corner of Southern England and is home to a = Roman Catholic Abbey of Cathedral proportions, which houses a 4 manual 74 stop Walker organ built in 1952. This was arguably the forerunner of the UK "Organ Reform Movement" : Ralph Downes, who was advisor to the project, = drew up the specification. It has been regarded as a "trial run" for the organ = in the Royal Festival Hall, though I would suggest that Buckfast Abbey enjoys =   considerably better acoustics. Those of you who have Downes' book "Baroque =   Tricks" published by "Positiv Press" (who are also publishers of Maurice Forsyth-Grant's "21 Years in Organ Building") will find considerable = detail contained therein. The specification of the organ can be found on the NPOR =   site - registration is required - and the abbey has a website, though = there is little on it about the organ. http://www.buckfast.org.uk/index.htm You can just see the foot of a couple of pipes on the case. Living in Greece, = I was interested to see that the roundel in the centre of the Sanctuary = floor comes from the Greek quarry that provided much of the marble used in the former cathedral of St. Sophia in Constantinople.       John Foss   http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/          
(back) Subject: Re: Trumpette From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 12:14:11 EST   Dear Monty: As a reed voicer, I can tell you that I have attempted to mate a = Trumpet and a Trompette to get a "Trumpette." The Trompette seemed to be "in = heat," but the Trumpet was completely unresponsive. One of our laboratory = assistants suggested that the Trumpet might, in fact, be "one of THOSE types of = Trumpets," but frankly, I'm usually pretty good at picking up on that sort of thing. We DID successfully mate an aardvark with a spear of asparagus, but I have no idea how to voice the results. I was hoping for some kind of = gutsy, woody Cromorne...   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 05 Feb 2005 11:17:14 -0600   Was it confirmed that the recovered items were in fact organ parts? IIRC, =   the article you linked to originally seemed to suggest that they really weren't sure.   --Tim   At 10:51 AM 2/5/2005, Jim wrote: >My original inquiry had to do with the fact that nearly all available >data on the BRITANNIC states that the organ was never installed. The >recovery crew found pipe organ parts. This is the mystery I put out >there.      
(back) Subject: Re: The H.M.H.S. Britannic From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 13:41:07 EST   Since this organ will never be played again because of severe water damage, The ship sunk! Perhaps what remains could find its way to an Ebay account. I can see it all now, "Driftwood Organ parts from the Britannic of historical significance" Starting bid on partial ranks $300.00 fish, clams, and squid free.   Ron    
(back) Subject: Moody Reuter specs (long) From: "Millie & David Kenney" <kenn411@bellsouth.net> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 15:11:36 -0500   To Richard Hazelip (and Scott Griffin at Moody) -- thanks a bunch for the = specs. of the Reuter at Moody Memorial Church.   Looks like a lot of fun to be had playing there!   David Kenney   Millie & David Kenney 135 18th Street, NE Cleveland, TN 37311   (423) 473-9705    
(back) Subject: box organs & casts of thousands From: <Seedlac@aol.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 15:21:19 EST   What is the general opinion of the effectiveness of using box organs as continuo for large choral and instrumental group in a large auditorium? I = recently tuned one for just such an occasion. The harpsichord builder was there and = I posed the same question to him. He just shrugged and said can't be much. = This is not a slam against the little organs, I have heard them used with great =   effect in smaller room where there were less than 250 in the audience and = a small instrumental & vocal group was performing. Nor do I desire to see the 9' Steinway rolled out for Messiah.   Any thoughts?   Steve  
(back) Subject: Re: box organs & casts of thousands From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 15:30:31 EST   The small pipe organ was the continuo of choice for oratorios; the harpsichord fit the bill for chamber music. Since oratorios were performed = in large churches, I assume that the positives and box organs were considered = adequate in spaces of that volume. Likewise, long before the age of amplification, harpsichords must have =   been sufficiently powerful for solo concerto use, rather than the tinkly caricatures often seen.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/ ..  
(back) Subject: Re: continuo organ design From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 15:44:03 EST   One of the biggest difficulties with continuo organs on the market = today (and the past half century) is that they are often built with a stoplist = that is of limited use for the intended purpose. The 8' Stopped Flute is = usually too small in scale and power, and the organ gets "spikier" as the pitches ascend. A small 4' Flute, surmounted by a 2' Principal and a shrill 1-1/3' =   Nineteenth provide no support or body for either the string complement of = the orchestra or the choir itself. Most continuo players would be thrilled to have a 4' open stop, either = of metal or wood, that provided pitch, body, and clarity. The 1-1/3' is essentially useless. A 2' stop that is too narrow simply separates from = the rest of the tonal force and calls attention to itself in a distracting and = unmusical way. This is not a call to submit designs for continuo organs, but rather a =   call to evaluate why we keep commissioning continuo organs that do not do = their jobs.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: This week's MP3 - Fantasia Breve From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Sat, 05 Feb 2005 12:47:55 -0800   Hello again, organophiles...   This week's composition is Fantasia Breve, an arresting modern composition (yes I have the composer's permission to post it!)   http://evensongmusic.net/audio/breve.mp3   Enjoy!   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: continuo organ design From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 15:01:47 -0600   I couldn't agree more. If continuo organ is being built with three stops = -- as many are -- the stops should be 8' Stopt Diapason, 4' Principal and 2' Fifteenth. Not only does a 4' Principal of metal or wood provide more power, but it is often of much more determinate pitch than a flute. So = far as pitch is concerned flutes tend to be fuzzy and indistinct. The 4 ft. line is what most choral ensembles listen for, and they are much more = likely to get an accurate pitch from a Principal than from a Flute. 4 ft. Flutes ought to be considered primarily as solo stops, as they were in the Anglo-American tradition before 1850.   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, February 05, 2005 2:44 PM Subject: Re: continuo organ design     > One of the biggest difficulties with continuo organs on the market today > (and the past half century) is that they are often built with a stoplist that > is of limited use for the intended purpose. The 8' Stopped Flute is usually > too small in scale and power, and the organ gets "spikier" as the = pitches > ascend. A small 4' Flute, surmounted by a 2' Principal and a shrill = 1-1/3' > Nineteenth provide no support or body for either the string complement = of the orchestra > or the choir itself. > Most continuo players would be thrilled to have a 4' open stop, = either of > metal or wood, that provided pitch, body, and clarity. The 1-1/3' is > essentially useless. A 2' stop that is too narrow simply separates from the rest of > the tonal force and calls attention to itself in a distracting and unmusical way. > This is not a call to submit designs for continuo organs, but rather = a > call to evaluate why we keep commissioning continuo organs that do not = do their > jobs.      
(back) Subject: RE: continuo organ design From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sun, 6 Feb 2005 10:13:30 +1300   >I couldn't agree more. If continuo organ is being built with three stops -- as many are -- the stops should be 8' Stopt Diapason, 4' Principal and 2' Fifteenth.   I'd go closely with this, but not quite. I'd want something a little different for the 4ft, so I'd have -   8 Stopt Diapason (wood) 4 Gemshorn (not flutey) 2 Fifteenth   Ross      
(back) Subject: Re: Flu Medication???? Playing while ill From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 5 Feb 2005 14:25:29 -0800 (PST)   ACTUALLY...LOL It was funny...Because that Sunday I was in the middle of the fever break = that you do when you are ill with anything that gives you a high = temperature. I sat next to one of my choir members, and she basically had = to nudge me. My ears were clogged in feeling, the pastor had to flag me to = start the sermon hymn, and I almost blacked out when getting up to and = away from the console. Not to mention the disturbance of coughing during = service, which the pastor joked about during the sermon. I wonder if others have had bad experiences of playing while ill, and = being so at the last moments notice.     From Desiree' T. Desiree' Hines Chicago, IL 60610 ---------------------------- For Compositions by Desiree' Frog Music Press www.frogmusic.com ------------------------------- FOR CONCERTS BY DESIREE' http://concertartist.info/bios/hines.html --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Search presents - Jib Jab's 'Second Term'