PipeChat Digest #5151 - Saturday, February 12, 2005
 
Re: Lent 1, at my church
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Lead Sheets
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Lent 1, at my church
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Transcriptions
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
This week from Organs and Organists online.
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
Re: Transcriptions
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Attack of the hobbyists (longish)
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: Mendelssohn ... was Bach: Toccata in D Minor
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Obituary:  James "Jimmy" Smith, Hammond organ pioneer
  by "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net>
"Massive" Organ in Kansas
  by "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net>
Re: Britannic Organ
  by "John Nisbet" <oberlingerusa@msn.com>
Re: Obituary:  James "Jimmy" Smith, Hammond organ pioneer
  by "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk>
Re: Blackington Wind Chests
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Re: Mendelssohn .War March of the Clerics
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Lent 1, at my church
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Re: Transcriptions
  by "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Lent 1, at my church From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 08:00:26 EST   >Lent 1 Music for our service at Immanuel > >Prelude Komm Susser Tod JSB (Transcribed by TDH) > >Processional Hymn NCH #22 Sing Praise to God >(Lobe Den Herren) >Introduction: Marcato for Lobe Den Herren TDH >Interlude, Modulation, Final Verse--arr. Swann > >(at my evaluation recently, which was very positive, >they could not stop talking about how much the >congregation is loving the way we are doing the >porcessional hymn. They had not processed with big >festive accompaniments in over 5 years) > >Anthem- Adoramus Te Christe G. Corsi > >Communion Hymn-As We Gather at Your Table (Beach >Spring) >Closing Hymn Forty Days and Forty Nights (Heinlein) > >Postlude Litanies Jehan Alain > >=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D >From Desiree' >T. Desiree' Hines >Chicago, IL 60610 >----------------------------   A couple of questions here:   1. Where is the lenten service? I don't see anything lenten here. = Starting off with "Lobe den Herren" doesn't sound very penetential to me. The = whole service looks/feels like a festival communion service.   2. Why don't you play a legitimate version of Komm Susser Tod? There are =   published arrangements out there, most famous being Virgil Fox's. A transcription is NOT taking someone else's arrangement and making your = arrangement of theirs, suiting it to your organ or abilities, it is going back to = original sources and making a note for note arrangement (as best as possible). The = romantic era organists, of course, took liberties, as did Stokowski, with his orchestral transcriptions of the Bach organ works, BUT the essence of the = work was there. Stylistically the feel was different, but the scholarly research = was done--no one can quibble there. It wasn't a haphazard easy-play = arrangement done at someone's whim.   3. What is a "porcessional" hymn? Is that when the porcine come marching =   down the aisle? I would think that in a non-liturgical church, or a "eucharistic church," as you have described this church to me, that lent = would be a time to to keep things more reflective. Since you don't have to follow rubrics = of a liturgy, you've got the flexibility to not process.   Oh, it just hit me...maybe a "Porcessional" is like in the Bible when = Jesus heals the man from the region of Gerasene, and casts out the demons called =   "Legion, because we are many" into the herd of pigs and they all go = running over the embankment into the lake and drown. I've seen some processionals in churches that look like herds of pigs running before.   Just a few random thoughts...   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Lead Sheets From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 08:17:19 EST   I guess I'm weird, but it amazes me that people have a hard time playing = off of lead sheets. I was taught at an early age to play from chord = charts/lead sheets. As a keyboard player, my piano and first organ instructor made = sure I knew that I would probably be handed sheets with just words and chords and =   that I would have to deal with that stuff working in a church, so they = prepared me for it. Be glad that there is at least a melody line and chords, from there, you can improvise an accompaniment. This kind of music isn't meant = to be played like "organ music", it's piano/guitar music, so it's sort of free = style anyway. Just enjoy it, have fun with it, don't sweat it.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Lent 1, at my church From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 14:20:10 +0100   Desiree' wrote: >Lent 1 Music for our service at Immanuel > >Prelude Komm Susser Tod JSB (Transcribed by TDH) Monty replied: > 2. Why don't you play a legitimate version of Komm Susser Tod? There = are > published arrangements out there, most famous being Virgil Fox's. A > transcription is NOT taking someone else's arrangement and making your = arrangement of > theirs, suiting it to your organ or abilities, it is going back to = original > sources and making a note for note arrangement (as best as possible). = The romantic > era organists, of course, took liberties, as did Stokowski, with his > orchestral transcriptions of the Bach organ works, BUT the essence of = the work was > there. Stylistically the feel was different, but the scholarly research = was > done--no one can quibble there. It wasn't a haphazard easy-play = arrangement done > at someone's whim. Jarle is puzzled: Are you (Monty) saying that Desiree's transcription isn't "legitimate" just because it hasn't been published? I don't think you are, but I don't really get your point.   - Jarle http://jarle.moo.no (may be unaccessible due to server trouble)  
(back) Subject: Transcriptions From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 08:39:32 EST   >Jarle is puzzled: >Are you (Monty) saying that Desiree's transcription isn't "legitimate" >just because it hasn't been published? I don't think you are, but I >don't really get your point.   I know that Desiree' didn't go back to original sources and transcribe, that's why I'm saying it's not legitimate. I've asked Desiree' about some = of her other transcriptions and she told me that she made up her own arrangements = from already published arrangements. Those are not transcriptions, those are arrangements of arrangements. Why do that when there are plenty of = transcriptions out there already. The Virgil Fox arrangment of "Komm Susser Tod" is very =   good, if you like a slushy, gushy, tug at the heart strings style of = playing, which I do. It's not all that easy to play, because it requires a lot of = finger substitution, an orchestral way of thinking, and an a great manual = technique for all the legato. I am sure that there are easier arrangements out = there, so if the Fox is too difficult, why not find an easier one, instead of bastardizing one of the already done arrangements, slapping your name on = it, and calling it a transcription. That does not make it a transcription and = never will. Because a piece isn't published doesn't make it good or bad, I've heard unpublished manuscript works that were/are much better than some of the = drivel that is published. My argument here is semantics. If someone went back and did the scholarly =   research, I say more power to them, but when someone isn't in school and = doesn't have access to full scores, then I doubt that the authoratative work was = done to call their arranging "transcribing." Let's call a spade a spade.   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: This week from Organs and Organists online. From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 15:43:19 +0200   We have added four files to the new additions section of organs and organists online this week: http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/new_additions.htm Two young organists, 15 year old Jared grenz playing Pachelbel on the = II/27 Grenz residence Cantor Digital Organ and Norwegian organist Jon Kristian Fjellestad playing a Trumpet Fanfare on the III/35 Snertingdal organ in Hamar Cathedral. A couple of my holiday "soundshots" - taken last year in Australia - an improvisation on the organ of Scotch College, Melbourne, which gives you a =   good idea of the tonal range of this instrument, a 1930 III/50 Hill Norman =   and Beard organ restored last year by Peter Jewkes of Sydney. A reminder = of the sound of the inter war years, the specification includes a full length =   pedal Open Wood 32', which makes my windows rattle! This can also be heard =   in the Chorale Prelude by Brahms "es ist ein ros entsprungen". The improvisation is intended to show off the build up from the flutes, = through the Diapasons, Full Swell and Trombas, back down to the Celestes. Finally Healey Willan's Chorale Prelude, which a friend of mine on the = list reminded me was a fine performance of a stirring work. Played by Douglas Marshall on the Marshall and Ogletree Trinity Wall Street Digital organ. I hope that there will be four photographs from Scotch College going on later - the console, the case and the very beautiful mosaic on the floor = of the Entrance Hall in the Music School. John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: Re: Transcriptions From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 15:40:52 +0100   > My argument here is semantics. If someone went back and did the = scholarly > research, I say more power to them, but when someone isn't in school and = doesn't > have access to full scores, then I doubt that the authoratative work was = done > to call their arranging "transcribing." Let's call a spade a spade. > > Monty Bennett Thanks for the clarification. I see your point now, and it is a good one.   Jarle  
(back) Subject: Attack of the hobbyists (longish) From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 10:00:45 -0500   Dear colleagues,   I belong to a list-serve of freelance performers who are currently discussing the driving down of business (including what freelance musicians can make at any given gig) because of hobbyists who 1) don't need the income and 2) therefore undercut the rates of professionals, not to mention any skill standards and 3) play charity gigs right and left giving the impression to the community that musicians just LOVE to play for free which may 4) lead to consequences like brides calling up and expecting to pay $100 or less for live musicians, i.e., less than what they're paying for napkins and/or matchbook covers. This led me to imagine a similarity to what we've been discussing on PipeChat:   I wonder if the oft-lamented "decline" in our profession is due more to shoddy thinking and practice than it is to our politeness, attitudes, etc., as is often blamed.   As an excuse for this we say "Well, you KNOW that most organists are amateurs, it isn't realistic to think that a country church could afford to... etc. etc." But is this an excuse for saying "anything goes", play whatever you want on any given Sunday? I mean, even if you are in a less liturgical setting, isn't it your responsibility to educate, to lobby, to advocate for the beauty and appropriateness of certain music for certain uses?   I was at a meeting of local church musicians recently. I thought it was fascinating that: 1) newly-joined members of the Methodist church that does ONLY contemporary music are lobbying the clergy to start an SATB choir to sing traditional music. The song leader also reported that "We did the coolest thing on Christmas Eve.. we've never done it before and we weren't sure if it would fly, but people loved it: we sang that song... oh... what is it... 'O come let us adore Him'... with JUST the organ!!!" This church has added an Easter Vigil service and Stations of the Cross. 2) the church that everyone points to as being the perfect model for a traditional PLUS contemporary music program recently flip-flopped their proportion of traditional and contemporary services (they had 2 trad/1 contemporary, now it's 1 trad/2 con) which led to an unforeseen drop in giving (to the tune of a 30% budget cut across the board) yet people are still crowing about the church and trying to copy it. 3) We have some former Catholics who joined our UCC church.. no matter what we try to do, they say it's still not right. And what would make it right? "You need a lady up front singing into a microphone on that song." With all these people church hopping and taking their ideas of what is "right" with them, isn't it up to us to say, "Uh, no... I'M right, because that's my training and expertise."?   I just wonder if through being flexible and accommodating, we're going to end up devaluing our skills and knowledge, and every denomination will soon look like every other, willy nilly.   I point to the recent post of the service order for Lent I which didn't look any different from Pentecost 15. It seems like some very knowledgeable people are doing "whatever" and calling it Lent. Some other knowledgeable people are objecting, some other knowledgeable people are saying "Big deal, it doesn't matter." My point is that the less things matter, the sooner we're all out of jobs. Regardless of our situation, big church, country church, paid or volunteer, hobbyists or not, we can still make a pact and vow to be "professional."   Chuck Peery St. Louis    
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn ... was Bach: Toccata in D Minor From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 11:19:16 EST   In a message dated 02/12/05, nijhuis@email.com enquires:   << Does anyone know of a good organ arrangment of "War March of the = Priests" from Mendelssohn's "Athalia" Op 74?>>   Jan -- I have the transcription someplace, and it's a very good one. I'll have to dig through the library to find it, since it isn't where it's = supposed to be, but it may be a British edition of the transcription by Best.   Seb    
(back) Subject: Obituary: James "Jimmy" Smith, Hammond organ pioneer From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 10:17:49 -0600   Posted on Thu, Feb. 10, 2005     Phila Daily News     http://www.philly.com/mld/dailynews/living/10861662.htm       In a category all by himself Jazz organist Jimmy Smith dies at home in = Arizona     By AL HUNTER JR. huntera@phillynews.com       No other jazz musician has been as closely identified with his instrument as Jimmy Smith was with the Hammond B-3 organ.     Smith not only played the B-3 with fiery soul, he revolutionized it, propelled the bulky instrument to band-leader status and created a smooth, rumbling groove that his disciples struggle to emulate to this day.     For James Oscar Smith was soul-jazz. His music was danceable, accessible and fun. Yet behind the easy groove was complexity: Smith's lightening-quick right hand and his frenzied feet, which pumped out bass lines on the organ's pedals that would shame some acoustic bass players.     Jimmy Smith, the Norristown kid who in the 1960s established the organ's position in jazz and became the icon against whom all organ players would be compared, died Tuesday in his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 79.     A spokesperson for Smith's record label, Verve, said Smith had been ill recently and apparently died of natural causes.     Smith was not the first to push the organ as a lead instrument. Bill Doggett, Wild Bill Davis and Milt Buckner had some success in the '40s and '50s. But Smith became the most popular, taking off in the late '50s and early '60s.     In fact, he became so popular that in 1964 Down Beat, once the dean of = jazz magazines, created the "organ" category for its annual readers poll. Many jazz writers saw the organ as a corny instrument, better suited for = church, skating rinks and baseball parks.     Smith would dominate the category.     "Jimmy had an aptitude of creating a different level of sound," said Philadelphia pianist and organist Trudy Pitts. As a youngster, Pitts was proficient in playing the church pipe organ, but she wanted to switch over to jazz. Listening to Smith helped her develop her sound, though it would be much lighter and more delicate than Smith's.     Years later Pitts, who had a brief recording career, visited Smith in California and was impressed by his piano playing. "He went over those piano keys like crazy," Pitts recalled.     "No one else in terms of coming along [in] the evolutionary period of jazz has captured the dynamics and power and all the things Jimmy Smith had," she said. Thanks to technology, virtually anyone can create a B-3 sound on a keyboard, but more is needed.     "I'm talking about an aura, a spirit, a soul," Pitts said. "Nobody [has] captured Jimmy Smith's spirit."     Philly might've helped formed that spirit. Smith and his trio played = around Philly in 1953, before he took off for New York in 1956.     In the late '50s and early '60s, Philly became the unofficial organ-trio capital of the universe, producing players such as Pitts, Don Patterson, Jimmy McGriff, Shirley Scott, Charles Earland and Richard "Groove" Holmes.     Smith, who attended the Ornstein School of Music here in 1949 and 1950 for piano, bought his first organ in 1953 after Bill Davis, the swing pianist turned organ player, challenged him, saying it would take Smith four years to learn how to work the foot pedals. He learned in about four months.     The first time Blue Note co-founder Francis Wolff heard Smith was in 1956 at Small's Paradise in New York.     "He was a stunning sight," Wolff has said, according to a statement released by Blue Note.     "A man in convulsions, face contorted, crouched over in apparent agony, = his fingers flying, his foot dancing over the pedals. The air was filled with waves of sound I had never heard before. The noise was shattering. A few people sat around, puzzled, but impressed.     "He came off the stand, smiling, the sweat dripping all over him. 'So what do you think?' 'Yeah!' I said. That's all I could say. Alfred Lion [the other Blue Note co-founder] had already made up his mind. When he heard a good thing - that was enough."     Smith had a long recording career. He cranked out albums for Blue Note = from 1956 to 1963. That era is arguably his most memorable, with such albums as "Midnight Special," "Back at the Chicken Shack" and "The Sermon."     He then signed with Verve from 1963 to 1972, where, though his work was much more commercial, he enjoyed his highest charting hits, "Walk on the Wild Side," with charts by Oliver Nelson, and "Hoochie Coochie Man." He opened a club in L.A. in the mid-'70s and signed again with Blue Note in = 1985.     Smith's organ-grinder swing influenced many players, including Philly's = own Joey Defrancesco, who is often described as carrying Smith's mantle.     "Jimmy was one of the greatest and most innovative musicians of our time," DeFrancesco said in a statement to Billboard.com. "I love the man and I love the music. He was my idol, my mentor and my friend."     They were scheduled to start a tour next week. An album by Defrancesco and Smith is due out next Tuesday. It's titled "Legacy."     And legacy is just what Smith leaves, in more ways than one. His tune = "Root Down" was sampled by the Beastie Boys on their 1994 album "Ill Communication." Numerous modern jazz organ rock trios, such as Medeski Martin and Wood, have sprung up, though they lack the true soulfulness Smith emanated. In 1997, Smith was given a bronze plaque on Philadelphia's Walk of Fame on South Broad Street.     Services: 10 a.m. Wednesday at Cannon Funeral Home, 2315 N. Broad St.      
(back) Subject: "Massive" Organ in Kansas From: "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 11:49:16 -0600   Regarding the Organ Trader ad about the "massive pipe organ" in Kansas......remember, a lay person often has no idea of the relative size = of a pipe organ. A friend of mine saw my tiny 3-rank Moller Artiste, and she kept saying, "It's HUGE! It's HUGE!" So this Kansas organ might well be only 3 or 4 ranks......or it might be 40!   Dennis Steckley Lover of Cats, Pipe Organs & 1940-65 Sewing Machines    
(back) Subject: Re: Britannic Organ From: "John Nisbet" <oberlingerusa@msn.com> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 14:03:09 -0500   Dear list,   I received more information from Mr. Michailakis today, in reply to my question "where are the pipes that Cousteau examined and thought were organ pipes, today?" Here is his reply:   Dear Mr.Nisbet,   The pipes should be still inside the wreck. According to the British Law, the wreck is a "war grave" and it's not allowed to retrieve items from it. This law was voted in 1986 ("Protection of Military Remains Act")by the British Parliament, that's why Cousteau was able to retrieve some items during his expedition -but not any pipes. The series of diving expeditions that followed Cousteau's discovery started only in 1995.Take also notice that in order to dive to the wreck it's needed permission issued by the Greek Government (Britannic lies in Greek territorial waters) and by Simon Mills (its current owner).   Hope that helps.   Best regards, Michail   ------------   Regards,   John Nisbet      
(back) Subject: Re: Obituary: James "Jimmy" Smith, Hammond organ pioneer From: "Harry Grove" <musicman@cottagemusic.co.uk> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 19:15:44 -0000   Thanks for letting us know, Tim. He was one hell of a fine player; wish I could improvise anything like = him.   It's because of him that I've invested in one or two of the modern = 'virtual' Hammond keyboards, and I like nothing better than trying to keep up when = he takes off on a lick.   You've got me thinking about what I might add to the service tomorrow in = his honour (on a completely conventional pipe organ). It will be an uphill struggle; but I'll get there. Somehow.   Harry Grove [a.k.a. a musicman determindly rolling up his sleeves]   Music is your own experience, your own thoughts, your wisdom. If you don't =   live it, it won't come out of your horn. They teach you there's a boundary =   line to music. But, man, there's no boundary line to art. Charlie Parker     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Tim Bovard" <tmbovard@earthlink.net> To: "Pipechat email list" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, February 12, 2005 4:17 PM Subject: Obituary: James "Jimmy" Smith, Hammond organ pioneer     > Posted on Thu, Feb. 10, 2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Blackington Wind Chests From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 14:29:01 -0600   Blackinton chests use various design features such as "butcher's blocked" toeboards in order to avoid the need for slider seals. Slider seals have been the bane of modern slider chests, causing numerous problems with leakage, channel slap, etc., and requiring replacement every quarter = century or so. Hopefully with Blackinton style chests the sliders never need refitting. They also (like some Casavants of the 1890's and a few = Holtkamps of the 1930's) use pneumatic pallets, a kind of long rectangular pouch rather than a traditional pallet. They work extremely fast and can be = used on higher pressures than a normal pallet. There is an article by Lyle Blackinton about the chests on the AIO website at http://www.pipeorgan.org/service/manuals/technical/design1.html   John Speller   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Michael David" <michaelandmaggy@comcast.net> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 11, 2005 9:15 PM Subject: RE: Blackington Wind Chests     > Not really into "sharing" (or html for that matter) nor am I a builder = but > you might want to check with Quimby > http://www.quimbypipeorgans.com/index.shtml as I believe they use the > Blackington design. John Speller, who frequents these lists, works for > Quimby and probably knows more about them than the average chatter. > > Michael > > > > Nathan Smith [erzahler@sbcglobal.net] > Fri 2/11/2005 7:41 PM > > I've been poking around on the 'net to find out what Blackington Wind Chests > are and what differentiates them from other slider chests, and I haven't > been able to find anything at all. Would anyone care to share this > information with the list? >      
(back) Subject: Re: Mendelssohn .War March of the Clerics From: <DudelK@aol.com> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 15:31:45 EST   There's one in the Oxford Book of Ceremonial Music for Organ. OUP 1998. There's lots of other fun stuff in that volume.   Dudelsvater im Himmelreich zum Gottesdienst  
(back) Subject: Re: Lent 1, at my church From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 13:51:27 -0800 (PST)   Regarding "Praise to The Lord"...or as the NCH puts is.."Sing Praise to God!" for Lent 1   I went in on Wednesday...saw the bulletin for Sunday...and said "okay..just fine!" I did attempt to make more Lenten suggestions...but of course, the pastor will do what the pastor wants.           __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail  
(back) Subject: Re: Transcriptions From: "Desiree'" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 12 Feb 2005 13:59:56 -0800 (PST)   No..he's right, Jarle I had looked at several arrangements by others, and saw that I did not like them (except Virgils, and I had to have this set to go in 3 weeks when I was doing it last summer). The only one I liked was Virgil's, but just did not have the time to get it together. I looked at 3 other settings of this chorale. From there, I made my own "arrangement" I suppose (rather than a transcription). Mine has the choral in various voices, including the pedal for a while, and some other things that make it more of an arrangement than a transcription. So, I ask a mea culpa for this.   OK...Im back to resting. Why are flu and colds so hard to rid of this year?     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com