PipeChat Digest #5163 - Saturday, February 19, 2005
 
something different
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Interchangable Hymn Tunes
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
easter vigil music
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Definition 3: [was: Fiddle-de-de [was: Weddings: ]]
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
Re: something different
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Foundation (was: Interchangable Hymn Tunes)
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Re: easter vigil music
  by "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com>
Weddings: act as contractor?
  by "Benjamin A Kolodziej" <bkolodzi@smu.edu>
Re: easter vigil music
  by <ContraReed@aol.com>
Re: easter vigil music
  by "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net>
The Alexandra Palace Organ on Organs and Organists Online
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
PipeChat IRC this evening,
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Interchangable Hymn Tunes
  by "Paul Kealy" <imkealy@yahoo.com>
reservoir ID
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Interchangable Hymn Tunes
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: something different
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: something different From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 07:11:18 EST   My orchestra conductor just went down with pneumonia. we were going to do = a Handel Organ concerto for Easter Prelude. I have played Langlais---"Song of Peace", which nicely emulates the = sunrise for years. i need a wazoo prelude, that i can order and learn quickly. 2-3 minutes. thanks dale in Florida where it is another beautiful sunrise  
(back) Subject: Re: Interchangable Hymn Tunes From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 07:55:59 EST   >That sounds like a lot of fun! >I always keep with "Foundation" on that hymn. You can >add some real Soul to it.   Desiree"- When you came to my church's Music Summit this past Fall, you told me that =   you didn't have any "soul" and wanted to learn how to get some because you = felt that people looked down on you because you SHOULD have it. Why are you = trying to add it to "Foundation" when you outright told me you had none? If you mean that you can play/sing it in 2, with a sort of swing to it, the = hymntune naturally does that if you let it do it's thing and slather it up with unnecessary fanfares and extraneous fluff that doesn't benefit anyone BUT = the organist. The hymn is an early American tune, and while it can be jazzed up with = some great "money" chords, I find that on simpler tunes like that (it's a = Pentatonic melody) keeping things simple are the best--vary the registration, or do = some key changes.   An exciting, but yet simple arrangement for choir and congregation, is = Emma Lou Diemer's arrangement of How Firm a Foundation, for brass, organ, choir = and congregation, published by Hinshaw as part of their Duke University Chapel =   Choir Series. One verse even has the choir voices in canon. (Dr. Diemer = was one of my professors in college--had to get that plug in for her LOL)   Monty Bennett   Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: easter vigil music From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 10:15:14 EST   for the first time in my life, i'll be playing an easter vigil. having = been raised and employed in non-liturgical churches, i haven't got a clue what would be appropriate prelude & postlude music. can anyone offer some = suggestions?     thanks,   scot in spokane  
(back) Subject: Re: Definition 3: [was: Fiddle-de-de [was: Weddings: ]] From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 10:20:56 -0500   The derivation of the word sincere: When statues had chips missing from the noses, ears, etc. they would be filled in with wax. The real thing, the genuine article, was "sine cere" = =3D without wax.     =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions: "There let the pealing organ blow, To the full-voiced choir below, In service high, and anthems clear, As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes". John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).   Merry Foxworth Open Door Realty Boston, MA 02131 617 469-4888 x207 877 865-1703 toll free http://www.opendoorrlty.com/ ----- Original Message ----- From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 18, 2005 2:02 AM Subject: Definition 3: [was: Fiddle-de-de [was: Weddings: ]]     I like defenition three, especially when used with wedding music/singers/soloits/quartets/organists/brides ... (dictionary.com)   3. A formal act without intrinsic purpose; an empty form: 'ignored the ceremony of asking for comments from other committee members.'     ----- Original Message ----- From: TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Subject: RE: Fiddle-de-de [was: Weddings: act as contractor?] Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 09:48:03 +1300   > > > > This could work, but where do you put it in the ceremony? :-) > > You've made me think there. Oh yes. To "cere" something is to wax it, and as > your bees produce beeswax, the wax (whacks) in the cere-mony should come > after the service is over. > > I think I'm being ingenious but pathetic. ;-)   Sad, but true. Good thing you're aware. :-)   > Ross     -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   -- ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>         __  
(back) Subject: Re: something different From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 09:52:00 -0600   I don't give this piece my heartiest recommendation, but it may work and = be effective if you have the right instrument and can fiddle with the = registration to get a feeling of gradual sunrise. The piece is "Toccata" = and it's by Michelle Leclerc. Without the repeat of the middle section, = it's about 3 minutes long. I have it in a booklet entitled, complete = with unneeded apostrophe, Toccata's. Published by m musiscript, MK 503, = =A9 1984 by Universal Songs Holland B.V.   BTW, The 2nd work in this slim volume is the Toccata, Op. 29, by Joseph = Callaerts, which is quite a piece. Unfortunately, there are a number of = missing accidentals and some other problems with this printing of the = piece, and I'd advise playing from the Butz edition (Nr. = 1198--Orgelmusik der franz=F6sischen Romantik, Band XI), which also = includes Callaerts' Toccata, Op. 23.   Robert Lind=20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Keys4bach@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Friday, February 18, 2005 6:11 AM Subject: something different     My orchestra conductor just went down with pneumonia. we were going to = do a Handel Organ concerto for Easter Prelude.   I have played Langlais---"Song of Peace", which nicely emulates the = sunrise for years.   i need a wazoo prelude, that i can order and learn quickly. 2-3 = minutes.   thanks   dale in Florida where it is another beautiful sunrise  
(back) Subject: Foundation (was: Interchangable Hymn Tunes) From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 10:07:19 -0600   If you need a recently-composed prelude on this tune, try Variations on Foundation by yours truly, which is in Volume 1 (starting on page 126) of 83 Musical Gifts, published by Darcey Press, (www.darceypress.com). Volume = 3 of this series, BTW, will be reviewed in the March 2005 issue of TAO.   Robert Lind   ----- Original Message ----- From: <RMB10@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 18, 2005 6:55 AM Subject: Re: Interchangable Hymn Tunes   > An exciting, but yet simple arrangement for choir and congregation, is Emma > Lou Diemer's arrangement of How Firm a Foundation, for brass, organ, = choir and > congregation, published by Hinshaw as part of their Duke University = Chapel > Choir Series. One verse even has the choir voices in canon. (Dr. Diemer was one > of my professors in college--had to get that plug in for her LOL)      
(back) Subject: Re: easter vigil music From: "Robert Lind" <lindr@core.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 10:25:56 -0600   For a postlude, Langlais' Incantation is perfect. I shouldn't think = you'd play a prelude. The organ may well be silent until the Gloria.   Robert Lind ----- Original Message -----=20 From: BlueeyedBear@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Friday, February 18, 2005 9:15 AM Subject: easter vigil music     for the first time in my life, i'll be playing an easter vigil. = having been raised and employed in non-liturgical churches, i haven't = got a clue what would be appropriate prelude & postlude music. can = anyone offer some suggestions?=20   thanks,   scot in spokane=20     -------------------------------------------------------------------------= -----   This message scanned for viruses by CoreComm=20  
(back) Subject: Weddings: act as contractor? From: "Benjamin A Kolodziej" <bkolodzi@smu.edu> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 11:41:30 -0600   I play for about 150 weddings a year at a university chapel. For the = first three years, I simply gave people a list of musicians (trumpeters, = soloists and string ensembles usually) if they requested. About 18 months ago I started contracting musicians myself, and I have noted the following:   1) When they were simply provided the list of musicians, they often disregarded all of them resulting in them using some "friend from college" =   or great-aunt or somebody who volunteers their services, and whose performances are the stuff of which wedding horror stories are made.   2) I have on my website (from which they select all their wedding music) = a description of the musicians I can provide them. I have noticed a trend--weddings which normally would not use extra musicians *will* hire them if all they have to do is send in the money. (People who pay $1500 = for three hours for a wedding at this chapel are usually not hurting for = money. .. . ) In fact, much of my business is done at the last minute--a week or =   two before. People will randomly ask if a trumpeter, for example, is available. Of course, I find one for them.   3) I observed the local musicians for three years before starting to contract. It was very important to me that every musician I use is not = only a top-rate musician, but highly professional and responsible. I only use the best. Not only is this wonderful for the bride and groom, but I have the privilege of working with some great musicians and playing some music beyond the usual standards--what an alleviation of boredom! Of course I never need to practice with these musicians beforehand since I have worked =   with them so many times before--that is one less headache (I have a fee if =   other musicians want to practice/meet beforehand.)   4) When contracting a musician to a bride, I email/fax/mail the bride a contract stating the details and the exact fee. (I also do this with the musician involved as well.) They keep one signed copy, mail one back to = me with a 20% deposit (ie., my profit), unless it is less than two weeks before, in which case I require full payment. I require in all circumstances full payment by two weeks in advance. (This minimizes the possibility of a bounced check--I do all my banking online so I can immediately see if I have a problem in that regard.) I then pay the musician directly the day of the wedding. I don't have to worry about bounced checks, and neither do they! (On the rare occasion that I have = been requested for a string ensemble, trumpeter and soloist the Thursday before--which of course I can accomodate--I require cash payment in full = at rehearsal. I probably should make them pay for an armoured car!)   5) I have found that 20% commission is rather standard. Most trumpeters and soloists in this area charge $150. I have agreements with many of = them who will take $125 and forteit to me $25--since I am able to provide them with so much more business than they would have had otherwise. This keeps =   the cost the same to the bride and groom, the musician gets business, and = I get to work with people whom I trust (not to mention to make a little = extra money.) It is a win-win-win situation for everyone.   6) I do contract all sorts of other musicians frequently (such as string ensembles, harpists, pianists, clarinetists, brass ensembles, etc.) I = have a non-public page of my website in which I give sound clips of many of the =   musicians I contract. This allows the bride to hear the musician in advance--usually for reassurance. I don't provide this page to them at = the outset, as I don't want them "shopping" for musicians. . . since I = wouldn't be able to guarantee someone would be available. I am also careful to = match the musician I select to the pieces required. I don't find an operatic sopranos to sing the weddings which want "The Wedding Song"! (All that is =   required to sing this song is to be able to sing a B mostly.)   Because everything is spelled out contractually between the musician and = me and the bride/groom and me (a contract should be detailed and contain a cancellation policy as well as a musician substitute/illness policy), I = have never had any problems in this regard. I did once use a soloist I had "auditioned" but not heard in performance. That was a mistake and, = although the bride and groom could have cared less, I was unhappy with her performance. I learned from my stupidity!   My "market share" is increasingly dramatically as I look ahead toward = March and April. Much to the perturbment of the other local contractors, I am nowcontracting 75% of the outside musicians for the chapel (I am the only organist for all weddings and am also university representative.) Once I learned which musicians to trust, the basic process, and got my contract forms developed, this really is an easy task. I make a little more money and have more control over the musicians with whom I work.   Hope this helps. Benjamin Kolodziej    
(back) Subject: Re: easter vigil music From: <ContraReed@aol.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 12:53:10 -0500   In a message dated 2/18/2005 11:25:56 AM Eastern Standard Time, "Robert = Lind" <lindr@core.com> writes:   >For a postlude, Langlais' Incantation is perfect. I shouldn't think you'd = play a prelude. The organ may well be silent until the Gloria.   At my own church, much of the music before the Gloria is a cappella, but = when we start the Gloria, people who have remembered to bring them, ring = bells along with the music. It makes a glorious noise, and really = surprises our visitors.   Richard Spittel Baltimore, MD  
(back) Subject: Re: easter vigil music From: "Shirley" <pnst.shirley@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 14:44:39 -0500   If I recall the service correctly, there should be no (or at most, muted) = prelude, since it's the next chapter after Good Friday. Partway through the = service, it becomes Easter, and so a joyous - but not big - Easter morning postlude is =   appropriate.   --Shirley   On 18 Feb 2005 at 10:15, BlueeyedBear@aol.com expounded:   > for the first time in my life, i'll be playing an easter vigil. > having been raised and employed in non-liturgical churches, i haven't > got a clue what would be appropriate prelude & postlude music. can > anyone offer some suggestions? > > > thanks, > > scot in spokane >        
(back) Subject: The Alexandra Palace Organ on Organs and Organists Online From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 22:23:15 +0200   Dear list,   As promised we have added a recent recording of the Prelude and Fugue in C =   BWV 545 by J S Bach, with photographs of the IV manual "Father Willis" organ in Alexandra Palace, London, to http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ by courtesy of David Wyld, Managing Director of Henry Willis & Co. This = can also be heard on the http://www.allypallyorgan.org.uk/ site - in fact a complete programme played by John Pryer, the titular organist of Alexandra =   Palace is to be found there. We have also added some photos of the organ from the Ally Pally site by courtesy of Stephen Walmsley of the Alexandra Palace appeal committee. The site also includes a history of the organ = and the full specification. We have included it on O & O O in the hope that it =   will be brought to a wider public. The organ has had a dramatic history. = It looks a bit lost without the 32' pipes in the case, but in view of its adventurous life - fire, enemy action, floods, vandalism and fractious committees to name but a few - it is a wonder that there are any pipes = left at all. An advantage of the lack of a case is the clarity with which those =   pipes which are present speak. I am sure you will all wish to join us in wishing this magnificent reminder of more spacious days a successful = future. You can read all about it at the above address. We already have a link to Henry Willis & Co, http://www.willis-organs.com/ a firm whose history = needs no introduction. It's a pity Colin's not here to discuss it! Tim Grenz is re-designing the site to accommodate the space we need. We nearly hit our Bandwith limit - 5 GB - last weekend and are having to expand. We have had over 4,000 visitors this month already, giving us 110,000 hits. 2/3rds of the visitors have come for the first time, and = they come from all over the world. You may wonder as to how they find us - I certainly did. Many come from this list - but looking at the statistics it =   is possible to trace the sources of other referrals, and one of these is Classic Cat at http://www.classiccat.net/index.htm set up by musician Wim Roffel. His well organised site gives links to over 1,500 sites offering free downloads of music as a service to the community. Highly recommended.   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: PipeChat IRC this evening, From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 16:26:46 -0500   All members of PipeChat are invited to join us in the PipeChat IRC any Friday and Monday evening - beginning at 9.00 PM Eastern Time.   To find out more about the Chat room, or how to get into it, go to PipeChat-L web page at http://www.pipechat.org/   You will find out all you need to know to join us.   Tonight at 9.00 PM, - I hope that we will see you there.   Cheers,   Bob Conway     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Interchangable Hymn Tunes From: "Paul Kealy" <imkealy@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 19:08:42 -0800 (PST)   I do that often. In fact, as I work with more "blended" contemporary-traditional services I try to maintain a good blend with some rather older hymn texts that wouldn't otherwise happen.   Sometimes I find a great hymn text to use that is set to a tune I know will not work, so I set it to a more familiar tune. (I must admit I do feel like I'm betraying the musicality of my leadership, but if the tune won't fly, I will rather use the words with something I know will accomplish an effective hymn service than sacrifice the words).   Also, I love to play the intro to a new verse sung to a different tune, then if it is a beloved tune, when the folks begin to sing, go acapella (Actually, I like to use a good sprinkling of acapella).   One day the pastor printed an effective poem in a first service.   After that sermon, I told him we could sing that to a familiar hymn tune, and the congregation sang them in the second and third services and loved it.   When he asked me how I figured that out, I said "that's why you pay me the beeg bucks to lead worship!" (heh!)   I have also taken a tune into the minor key for a verse, such as singing _There is a Fountain_ in "C" and then telling them on verse two (the dying thief ....) sing the same notes pretending there are three flats in the signature.   And although folks try to remove Shakespearean prose, our congregations love to sing the first verse of _The Lord's My Shepherd, I'll not want / He makes me down to lie_ for a verse by the choir (Crimond), then I turn to the congregation to lead it to the tune of _Amazing Grace How Sweet the Sound_ for the remainder of the verses, reminding them that the hymn is the text, and the Early Psalter had words that could be sung to a variety of tunes.   And how could we Americans ever start a baseball game if Francis Scott Key's poem hadn't found a mate with _To Anacreon, in Heav'n, where he sat in full glee_.   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++ "David Evangelides" wrote In congregational singing, has anyone ever switched from one tune to another recognized alternative tune for the final verse?   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Paul E. Kealy www.BRASSweb.org www.MediaExcellence.com +++++++++++++++++++++++++++  
(back) Subject: reservoir ID From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 22:22:39 EST   is there any way to identify a builder from looking at a reservoir? we = have found a reservoir from our 1905 organ but are unable to find any = indication of the builder on it. can someone please help?   scot in spokane  
(back) Subject: Re: Interchangable Hymn Tunes From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 22:23:28 +0000      
(back) Subject: Re: something different From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 18 Feb 2005 23:23:22 EST   thanks Bob... dale