PipeChat Digest #5164 - Sunday, February 20, 2005
 
Organ Voluntaries
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #5163 - 02/19/05
  by "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com>
Re: Organ Voluntaries
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: Organ Voluntaries
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
RE:  easter vigil
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Organ Voluntaries
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
http://www.johann-sebastian-bach.org/
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Re: easter vigil
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
ALTERNATE TUNES
  by "keyplayr" <keyplayr@telus.net>
Re: ALTERNATE TUNES
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: easter vigil
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
The Palms in a Hymn Version
  by "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com>
Re: easter vigil
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: The Palms in a Hymn Version
  by <ProOrgo53@aol.com>
Re: The Palms in a Hymn Version
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Organ Voluntaries
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
RE: Organ Voluntaries
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Organ Voluntaries
  by "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net>
Re: Organ Voluntaries
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Organ Voluntaries
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: easter vigil music
  by <Justinhartz@aol.com>
Re: reservoir ID
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net>
 

(back) Subject: Organ Voluntaries From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 14:36:19 -0000   Dear all,   I recently had a chat with a splendid organist. The man is retired and has been playing for a very long time. Ergo he has a huge wealth of pieces at his disposal. He told me that every time he plays he writes down the voluntaries that he plays throughout the service. The reason he writes = them down is so that he does not play them again until he has gone through his repertoire. This could be two or three years later.     Personally I find this practice rather unusual. I find it better to rotate between twenty or so voluntaries and play them for six months then find another twenty and do the same. This way I find the congregation has a = sense of familiarity with the music and many enjoy hearing pieces they already know.     Does anyone have any thoughts on either of the two practices?     Regards.    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #5163 - 02/19/05 From: "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 10:11:05 -0500   IMHO, NO prelude is appropriate. The Roman Catholic Easter Vigil starts in darkness and silence; any singing is strictly a capella. The organ should NOT be used until the celebrant intones the Gloria in Excelsis, and then all hell should break loose - both symbolically and literally. Last year the pastor told me that when the bells started ringing and I let loose with an improvisation at that point, one of the children in the congregation woke up and started crying. As the pastor said, that is the whole point!! He was pleased, I think. For a postlude, the Widor Toccata from the 5th Symphony is traditional for me. David Baker   On Feb 19, 2005, at 5:01 AM, PipeChat wrote:   > for the first time in my life, i'll be playing an easter vigil. > having been > raised and employed in non-liturgical churches, i haven't got a clue > what > would be appropriate prelude & postlude music. can anyone offer some > suggestions? >    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voluntaries From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 09:25:26 -0500   Regarding rotation/repetition: I do write a date at the top of the opening page of any piece I play in worship. I do admit to rotating some pieces more frequently than the gentleman Dominic describes... but I only do that if the piece is so perfect for the scripture or occasion that it overrides the frequency issue. And sometimes when you're thinking about using a certain tune, certain arrangements really jump out at me where others do not. So if I have five arrangements of a certain tune, I just can't bear to play the less attractive ones before I get around to the ones I like again. I realize it's all subjective. All this being said, what I've found is that even among the most sophisticated worshippers, very few pay enough attention to the organ voluntaries to remember and comment: "Didn't you play that piece already this choir year?" Especially when the first time I listed it as a tune name and the second time I listed it as the first line of the hymn text we used for that tune that day!   Chuck Peery St. Louis    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voluntaries From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 11:12:05 -0500   i do what your splendid organist friend did, except that i keep it on my = computer. however, i might end up repeating some literature before i've = gone thru my ENTIRE repertoire, simply because i might have enough advent = music for three years, but only enough epiphany music for two years. but = i do try to exhaust one season's repertoire before repeating anything = appropriate to that season.   scot in spokane.  
(back) Subject: RE: easter vigil From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 11:13:21 -0500   this is a congregational church, not roman catholic. but the service will = still follow traditional lines.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voluntaries From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 11:17:34 EST   i say, learn 3 years and move on--------- or, no one will know if you repeat...........especially if it is well done = and appropriate to the day/season/and so on. has anyone seen M. Burkhardt's piece on In Thee is Gladness from = Morningstar? how wonderful a piece. anyway, Jonathan would have written it first if he had been a Lutheran. dale in Florida, head of sick household, waiting to eat again. :-)  
(back) Subject: http://www.johann-sebastian-bach.org/ From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 17:00:11 -0000   I presume most of you will know this site, but http://www.johann-sebastian-bach.org/ has some great free mp3s of Bach's organ music.    
(back) Subject: Re: easter vigil From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 12:18:46 +0000   On 2/19/05 4:13 PM, "BlueeyedBear@aol.com" <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> wrote:   > this is a congregational church, not roman catholic. but the service wil= l > still follow traditional lines. >=20 Scot:   Regardless of denomination, if it's following "traditional lines," those who've urged silent organ up to the Gloria in excelsis are surely quite right. Don=B9t even CONSIDER anything that could be called a =B3Prelude.=B2 Mos= t likely, when the New Fire is struck, the congregation will not be in a room where there is an organ anyway!   By the way: I think some church in Spokane has a Hope-Jones instrument formerly in the ?Liberty Theatre in Seattle, and then moved in 1955-56 to the gymnasium at Pacific Lutheran College in Tacoma. And then to Spokane probably in the 1960s or so. Got any idea where it is?   Alan Freed www.stlukesnyc.org   (That website has a bunch of Easter Vigil photos.)  
(back) Subject: ALTERNATE TUNES From: "keyplayr" <keyplayr@telus.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 10:35:47 -0800   MANY wrote about using FOUNDATION and/or ADESTE FIDELIS, et al. as tunes for the <Girdle Hymn> (How Firm a Foundation... for the uninitiated) but to those of us belonging to the great unwashed majority of Anglophone Christians these tunes are either unknown OR inextricably attached to specific, seasonal, universally-known texts. (ADESTE FIDELIS of course to its Christmas-theme text translated from the Latin).   The tune ST.DENIO (sometimes referred to as JOANNA) is likewise firmly joined in our <unAmerican> minds to the <girdle> text. It is only in the last fifteen years or so with American commercial hymnals and American-trained musicians increasingly penetrating mainline Canadian churches that the tune FOUNDATION would be recognizable to all but the most rabid hymnophiles. While FOUNDATION is a fine, strong tune, it will never replace ST.DENIO as a generator of lively, fervent singing, particularly in its original Welsh passing-note version (purified for use in most mainline hymnals by misinformed revisionists). <:-|   What is even more interesting is that tune traditions and preferences DO cross the 49th parallel with the <traditional> sic. British tunes being well-entrenched in Eastern parts of North America on both sides of the border while those of the American Evangelical tradition are firmly entrenched in Western Canada due, amongst other influences, to the fact that the Lutheran churches have always procured their hymnals from US mid-west sources (synods and other).   I agree with Paul Smith that DIADEM is a <right rouser> of a tune but if sung thru all the verses of All Hail... might necessitate the attendance of the Cardiac Response Team (at least in the churches of my acquaintance). In fact I have been at a HymnSing where each of the six verses of All Hail... was sung to a different tune!!! Not recommended for typical congregations but it actually worked and was an educational experience for the hymntune- challenged in attendance.   I do wish though that Americans would see the light and ditch that dreary dirge HAMBURG and embrace instead the magnificent (and heart-lifting) tune ROCKINGHAM; and that Lutherans would please stop referring to CHESTERFIELD when they really mean RICHMOND!   BTW- despite the rants, I often enjoy some of the very informative and timely info shared by many of the listers. Mahalo nui loa! =3DD> Nunc Dimittis... Amen (Until next time) :-P     theSubject: Re: Interchangable Hymn Tunes From: "Paul Smith" <kipsmith@getgoin.net> Date: Thu, 17 Feb 2005 22:36:11 -0600   >From the United Methodist Hymnal, we often sing "All Hail the Power..." = to the simpler tune Coronation #154 for 4 verses(as written in F major), then modulate up to G major for verse 5, then go across the page to #155 for = the last verse to the tune Diadem in Ab. Nobody in my congregation can sing = all six verses to the much more energetic Diadem, but it is a real thrill to modulate up and open up the swells and sing at least one verse to the stronger tune. Kip in Missouri   ----- Original Message ----- From: "David Evangelides" <davide@theatreorgans.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, February 17, 2005 12:38 PM Subject: Interchangable Hymn Tunes   -- The purpose of EDUCATION is to turn an EMPTY mind into an OPEN one.  
(back) Subject: Re: ALTERNATE TUNES From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 14:06:09 -0500   > I do wish though that Americans would see the light and ditch that > dreary dirge HAMBURG and embrace instead the magnificent (and > heart-lifting) tune ROCKINGHAM;   How sad that some folks do not recognize the excellence of Lowell = Mason tunes, including "Hamburg." It is a come-and-go, on-again/off-again = affair with his tunes, but their enduring qualities rightfully carve out their solid place in the repertoire. I don't sense any less attractive about = them than about many a psalter tune. >and that Lutherans would please stop referring to CHESTERFIELD when they really mean RICHMOND!   Point well made.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: easter vigil From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 16:02:33 -0500   In a message dated 2/19/2005 7:18:46 AM Eastern Standard Time, Alan Freed = <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> writes:   >By the way: =A0I think some church in Spokane has a Hope-Jones instrument >formerly in the ?Liberty Theatre in Seattle, and then moved in 1955-56 to >the gymnasium at Pacific Lutheran College in Tacoma. =A0And then to = Spokane >probably in the 1960s or so. =A0Got any idea where it is?   hello, alan. no, i just moved here last spring, and have only seen a few = of the instruments here. the guild chapter is rather small -- about 50 or = so, but they're a very nice bunch. if i remember, i'll ask at our next = meeting to see if anyone knows about it.   scot  
(back) Subject: The Palms in a Hymn Version From: "Emily Adams" <eadams@cinci.rr.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 17:25:46 -0500   Hi Chatters,   My husband, a substitute organist of modest ability, has been asked to = play Faure's The Palms in an arrangement for congregational singing, i.e., as a hymn, for Palm Sunday. The church's hymnal does not include the piece--in the past the text has been printed out in the bulletin. I'm curious if there's a hymnal anywhere which does have the piece, or can anyone point = him toward a rather straightforward arrangement? I don't think his musical ability (nor my time) allows for adapting the SATB or solo vocal accompaniment for this use.   At this point he is willing to look for an arrangement, although of course =   one obvious alternative is to simply tell the pastor he'll have to come up =   it himself.   Thanks,   Emily A.    
(back) Subject: Re: easter vigil From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 17:53:15 +0000   On 2/19/05 9:02 PM, "BlueeyedBear@aol.com" <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> wrote:   > if i remember, i'll ask at our next meeting to see if anyone knows about = it.   I'd appreciate that.   The personal angle is that I was in the class of 1955 at PLC (now PLU). Late in 1954 (I think) the word got out that the Liberty Theatre was to be razed. The organ available to anyone. So a friend and I (in the college AGO chapter) campaigned to get our class to =B3get=B2 that organ and install it in the gymnasium as our Class Gift. Well, that didn=B9t sell at all.   But after we graduated, a few of our friends continued the pursuit, GOT the organ (for nothing), and brought it to the campus. It sat in storage for a year, while Prof. R. Byard Fritts (whose son Paul was then a little kidlet) did a sabbatical year back east. When he returned, he got students togethe= r to install it (with all its toys) in the space above the basketball court.   I never got to hear it. But some years later, knowing that it had been played at half time for many basketball games, we heard that it was going t= o a church in Spokane (in the wake, I think, of the replacement of the gymnasium). =20   Sketchy; but that=B9s all I know.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: The Palms in a Hymn Version From: <ProOrgo53@aol.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 17:55:42 EST   As all (service playing) organists are likely aware, Hymns of Celebration (and a couple other newest hymnals) have "hymn-style" versions of = Malotte's "Lord's Prayer" and Handel's "Hallelujah." To date, I've not seen a = hymnic edition of "The Palms."   If, however, the church where your husband is substituting has a choir, = there is no reason why the congregation could not sing-along with the choir as = it presents the choral (SATB) version. Folks would sing "the melody" in = their own, personal, range / vocal comfort-zone.   Speaking of "The Palms" - when is SOMEONE going to prepare and publish an edition which uses present-day language? How about it, Hope?   This is LONG overdue and sorely needed - simply because there are hundreds =   (if not thousands) of churches which expect, yea "demand," this piece on = an annual basis.   The lines which include "degredation" - or whatever archaic word/words = exist in the translation to English of the original French simply "do not fly" - =   they're meaningless even to the senior members of most chuches, let alone = the young adults and teen listeners!   Back to the original question - can your husband simply have the = requesting Pastor find out from the church's previous organist what sheet music was = used to accompany this piece ?   Dale Rider        
(back) Subject: Re: The Palms in a Hymn Version From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 18:10:17 -0500   "The Palms" does indeed exist in the form of a hymn -- I have it in front of me in "Seth Parker's Hymnal," published by Carl Fischer in 1930. There may be other older hymnals that include it too, but this is the first one I looked at.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   ProOrgo53@aol.com wrote:   > As all (service playing) organists are likely aware, Hymns of > Celebration (and a couple other newest hymnals) have "hymn-style" > versions of Malotte's "Lord's Prayer" and Handel's "Hallelujah." To > date, I've not seen a hymnic edition of "The Palms." >    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voluntaries From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 20:20:49 -0500   My personal opinion is that it does not hurt to repeat stuff. If I = don't remember what I played when at what church (I sub), I'm pretty = sure the congregation won't either! I think that even us musicians = (unless you're Mozart) don't "get" a piece just hearing it one time = through, and a repetition would just make it vaguely familiar.   Years ago I did an experiment. I played Bach Christ lag in Todesbanden = from the Orgelbu"chlein soft and slow for the prelude and loud and fast = for the postlude, at the same service! Guess what, nobody noticed!!!   Merry   =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-=20   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions:=20 "There let the pealing organ blow,=20 To the full-voiced choir below,=20 In service high, and anthems clear,=20 As may with sweetness, through mine ear,=20 Dissolve me into ecstasies,=20 And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes".=20 John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).=20   Merry Foxworth Open Door Realty=20 Boston, MA 02131 =20 617 469-4888 x207 877 865-1703 toll free http://www.opendoorrlty.com/ ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Dominic Scullion=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2005 9:36 AM Subject: Organ Voluntaries     Dear all,   I recently had a chat with a splendid organist. The man is retired and = has been playing for a very long time. Ergo he has a huge wealth of = pieces at his disposal. He told me that every time he plays he writes = down the voluntaries that he plays throughout the service. The reason he = writes them down is so that he does not play them again until he has = gone through his repertoire. This could be two or three years later.   =20   Personally I find this practice rather unusual. I find it better to = rotate between twenty or so voluntaries and play them for six months = then find another twenty and do the same. This way I find the = congregation has a sense of familiarity with the music and many enjoy = hearing pieces they already know.   =20   Does anyone have any thoughts on either of the two practices?   =20   Regards.    
(back) Subject: RE: Organ Voluntaries From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 19:58:48 -0600   Well, I guess the answer all has to do with your philosophy. Sure, most people are not going to notice what preludes/postludes you play, and you could get away with playing the same with great frequency. But what about those worshippers who do pay attention and listen to the music? Those for whom music plays a large part of their worship? You may not even be aware of their presence. I find it extremely heartening that there are those who vary the repertoire and are always striving to expand it to provide variety instead of playing the same stuff over and over. And I appreciate those musicians who strive to make the music and the scriptures, the season and the themes mesh together. That's the beauty of a liturgical church and having a lectionary.   Sorry - I just woke up in a pontificating mood.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com (soon to be for rent in a court near you, or not)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Dominic Scullion Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2005 8:36 AM   I recently had a chat with a splendid organist. The man is retired and has been playing for a very long time. Ergo he has a huge wealth of pieces at his disposal. He told me that every time he plays he writes down the voluntaries that he plays throughout the service. The reason he writes them down is so that he does not play them again until he has gone through his repertoire. This could be two or three years later.   Personally I find this practice rather unusual. I find it better to rotate between twenty or so voluntaries and play them for six months then find another twenty and do the same. This way I find the congregation has a sense of familiarity with the music and many enjoy hearing pieces they already know.   Does anyone have any thoughts on either of the two practices?          
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voluntaries From: "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 21:29:49 -0500   I should perhaps clarify what I wrote earlier. I would not play the same piece over and over in the same church either. I would get tired of that too! But I would not be so slavish as to try to avoid playing the same thing twice in two years or something; I find that ridiculous.     =B4=A8=A8)) -:=A6:- =B8.=B7=B4 .=B7=B4=A8=A8)) ((=B8=B8.=B7=B4 ..=B7=B4 -:=A6:-   An excerpt from Robert Giddings "Musical Quotes and Anecdotes", published in Longman Pocket Companions: "There let the pealing organ blow, To the full-voiced choir below, In service high, and anthems clear, As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heav'n before mine eyes". John Milton - Il Penseroso (1632).   Merry Foxworth Open Door Realty Boston, MA 02131 617 469-4888 x207 877 865-1703 toll free http://www.opendoorrlty.com/ ----- Original Message ----- From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2005 8:58 PM Subject: RE: Organ Voluntaries     > Well, I guess the answer all has to do with your philosophy. Sure, most > people are not going to notice what preludes/postludes you play, and you > could get away with playing the same with great frequency. But what > about those worshippers who do pay attention and listen to the music? > Those for whom music plays a large part of their worship? You may not > even be aware of their presence. > I find it extremely heartening that there are those who vary the > repertoire and are always striving to expand it to provide variety > instead of playing the same stuff over and over. And I appreciate those > musicians who strive to make the music and the scriptures, the season > and the themes mesh together. That's the beauty of a liturgical church > and having a lectionary. > > Sorry - I just woke up in a pontificating mood. > > Glenda Sutton > gksjd85@direcway.com > (soon to be for rent in a court near you, or not) > > -----Original Message----- > From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of > Dominic Scullion > Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2005 8:36 AM > > I recently had a chat with a splendid organist. The man is retired and > has been playing for a very long time. Ergo he has a huge wealth of > pieces at his disposal. He told me that every time he plays he writes > down the voluntaries that he plays throughout the service. The reason he > writes them down is so that he does not play them again until he has > gone through his repertoire. This could be two or three years later. > > Personally I find this practice rather unusual. I find it better to > rotate between twenty or so voluntaries and play them for six months > then find another twenty and do the same. This way I find the > congregation has a sense of familiarity with the music and many enjoy > hearing pieces they already know. > > Does anyone have any thoughts on either of the two practices? > > > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voluntaries From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 21:54:35 +0000   On 2/20/05 1:20 AM, "Merry Foxworth" <m.foxworth@verizon.net> wrote:   > Years ago I did an experiment. I played Bach Christ lag in Todesbanden f= rom > the Orgelb=FCchlein soft and slow for the prelude and loud and fast for the > postlude, at the same service! Guess what, nobody noticed!!!   I DO believe it. Easily!   Well, posting from a preacher=B9s point of view, I=B9ll tell about the =B3new pastor,=B2 who delivered a crackerjack sermon. Second Sunday, same sermon. = A few people noticed, but nobody complained. It was good.   Third Sunday: Same sermon. Now the Vestrymen were muttering among themselves.   Fourth Sunday: STILL the same sermon! Now, the vestry met, quietly, to talk about this.   Fifth Sunday: Same sermon. Called the vicar on the carpet. =B3Well,=B2 he said, =B3You haven=B9t acted on THAT sermon so far. Get to work on THAT one, and I=B9ll give you another one.=B2   It COULD be applied to music!   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voluntaries From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 21:57:33 +0000   On 2/20/05 1:58 AM, "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> wrote:   > Sorry - I just woke up in a pontificating mood. > Well, OK. So back to bed, when you feel like it. But you're surely RIGHT ON.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: easter vigil music From: <Justinhartz@aol.com> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 23:55:27 EST   No need to worry about a prelude, since the service starts outside the = church door with the lighting of the fire. Technically, the organ sould not sound until the Gloria. Any festive postlude will be fine. Good luck! I'd much rather play for Vigil than sunrise!   Justin Hartz  
(back) Subject: Re: reservoir ID From: "Richard Schneider" <arpschneider@starband.net> Date: Sat, 19 Feb 2005 23:53:58 -0600 (Central Standard Time)   You wrote: -------Begin Original Message------- is there any way to identify a builder from looking at a reservoir? we = have found a reservoir from our 1905 organ but are unable to find any = indication of the builder on it. can someone please help?   --------End Original Message------   Sometimes, a signature can be found inside the Reservoir by the original builder. However, Reservoirs are oftentimes "supply house" type parts = -even back then! Unscrew a Bung Board and go hunting with a flashlight. You may get lucky! Sincerely, Richard Schneider