PipeChat Digest #5169 - Monday, February 21, 2005
 
Re: Social Clubs vs. Houses of Worship
  by <TubaMagna@aol.com>
Felix Hell in Marmoutier/France. Concert Announcement
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
Preachers List-ers
  by "Ned Benson" <nbenson@stjohnschurch.org>
American Oddities
  by "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net>
Re: Social Clubs vs. Houses of Worship
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
PipeChat IRC this evening,
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Glatter Goetz
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
RE: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours?
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Boston area
  by "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com>
Finances
  by "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com>
Re: Finances
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours?
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Pipechat IRC
  by <AEolianSkinner@aol.com>
Re: Pipechat IRC
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
RE: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours?
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: sunrise services
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
RE: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours?
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
Re: Finances
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Social Clubs vs. Houses of Worship From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 13:07:25 EST     Religious institutions (originally conceived as houses of worship) = have been class-based for generations, if not centuries. In every city I have visited, there is always "THE" church to attend within a particular = denomination. One hears, "they're loaded," or, "anybody who is ANYBODY 'goes' there." I = have yet to hear somebody say that "they conduct the most dignified and moving worship service, and are such a warm and welcoming community." Before continuing, it is obvious that this is a generalization. Yet generalizations frequently come from repeated observation (or more likely, =   perception) of actions or conditions (all opera singers are self-centered, = all axe-murderers have an axe to grind, all homosexuals are artistic, all = French people are great cooks, all babies act infantile, et cetera). So we OBSERVE that people "go to church" to belong to a group, and = they want that group to be acceptable -- and then MORE than acceptable, and = then desirable, and eventually enviable. Once we are part of the enviable = group, we look at the other fish in the pond, and wish to be better dressed, arrive = in a better car, be accompanied by a better-looking spouse, because we have = driven in a better car from a much bigger house (and somehow, we will make sure = that everybody KNOWS that). None of this is limited to the Christian denominations. I have seen enough front pew holders arrive late for synagogue on High Holy Days -- = and let the fashion show begin! Unfortunately, Americans are in denial about the fact that we still describe what was supposed to have been a democratic republic as such. We = now, in fact, live in an increasingly crippling theocracy, in which our = Constitution means less and less in such small increments that we are grateful for the = slow erosion, lest we have to face the facts. Americans seem not to object to = living in a tightening right-wing theocracy because this is what they have = chosen, either by direct choice, or by choosing to let it happen. So we really cannot object to religious institutions as social clubs = when we ourselves have created them or permitted them to galvanize. Terms like "Crusade" are used by politicians (we used to have leaders and statesmen) = who may not even really know what the Crusades WERE. "Army Chaplain" doesn't seem oxymoronic when billions are paid in salaries for men who kill other men = -- yet it is, for all intents and purposes, illegal for men to love other men. So those of us whose lives are devoted to the mechanisms and = activities of praise search for the root of what drew us to religion. We join our own =   groups (this and other chat lists) to assure ourselves that there are = others like us who really DO want to be equal in the eyes of The Almighty, DO wish to = be better people, DO regret the hurts they have caused, willingly or without knowledge. We look around, on Saturday or Sunday, for others like us, = within the closed communities of our churches and synagogues, who, although probably = there for a teeny-weeny bit of status, are also there for the primary purpose: focusing on a force much greater than ourselves, with the hopes of = refining our emotions, feelings, and thoughts.   Sebastian M. Gluck New York City http://www.glucknewyork.com/   ..  
(back) Subject: Felix Hell in Marmoutier/France. Concert Announcement From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 19:08:40 +0100   Dear listmembers and friends,   this is to announce Felix Hell's upcoming recital in Marmoutier/Alsace, performing on the one of probably only two remaining, relatively unaltered Andreas-Silbermann-organs.   Location: =C9glise Saint-Etienne, Marmoutier/Alsace Date/time: March 6, 2005, 4 pm Organ: Andreas-Silbermann of 1709/1710   PROGRAMM   Pierre du Mage (1674-1751) =84Grand Jeux=93 aus Livre d=92Orgue   Johann-Sebastian Bach (1685 =96 1750) Fantasy G Major (piece d=92orgue), BWV 572 =84O Mensch bewein dein S=FCnde gro=DF=93, BWV 622   Francois Couperin (1668-1733) Messe pour les couvents de religieux et religieuses I. Plein Jeu II. Fugue sur la Trompette IX. Basse de Trompette XVII. R=E9cit de Cornet XX. Dialogue sur les Grand jeux   Nicolas de Grigny (1672 - 1703) from Livre d=92Orgue: R=E9cit de Tierce en Taille   Louis Clerambeault (1676-1749) Suite du 2=E8me ton Plein jeu Duo Trio Basse de Cromorne Flutes R=E9cit de Nazard Caprice   Johann-Sebastian Bach (1685 =96 1750) Prelude and Fuge Eb Major, BWV 552   If you are in Europe by chance, or are located close by in France or the SW of Germany, in particular the Palatinate/Germany, Felix would feel honored if you could attend. The Alsace is a wonderful area, and Marmoutier is a ancient town and a lovely place to spent a weekend with great food and wines. After a few glasses you will not even realize that the organ is tuned on 440 Hz one note lower than the Kammerton a :-)   Hans-Friedrich Hell        
(back) Subject: Preachers List-ers From: "Ned Benson" <nbenson@stjohnschurch.org> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 10:09:33 -0800   I don't want to enter any fray about preaching, canned or otherwise, but do want to caution Listers that some ministers do read this List and you never know who knows whom.   -- Dr. Ned H. Benson St. John's Presbyterian Church 1070 West Plumb Lane Reno, Nevada 89509 http://www.stjohnschurch.org    
(back) Subject: American Oddities From: "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 12:20:36 -0600       Subject: RE: sunrise services From: "Will Light" <will.light@btinternet.com> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 10:21:54 -0000   I certainly have got the gist of this. But what puzzles me is how I've = been a member of this group for several years now, and this peculiarity has = never been mentioned until now. What other liturgical oddities have you = Americans got up your sleeves that you haven't mentioned yet?   >>>>>>>>>>>>>When I used to play in a Catholic church, I had to deal = with a phenomenon known as the "Polka Mass." A local polka band would provide music for the Mass. The words to the hymns were reprinted in a = "bulletin." All the tunes were polka tunes. I was normally just told, "Um, you = won't have to play for Mass on such-and-such a day. We're having a polka = Mass." I wouldn't go anywhere near the place that day, but I was always told it = was a capacity crowd. =20   Bob Nickel Sturgeon Bay Moravian Church (And, yes ... we have an Easter sunrise service in a local cemetery. = It's part of Moravian heritage to have an Easter sunrise service in a = cemetery. I find the liturgy for that service very moving. Hymns are led by a = church band.) =20          
(back) Subject: Re: Social Clubs vs. Houses of Worship From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 14:39:44 -0500     On Feb 21, 2005, at 1:07 PM, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Unfortunately, Americans are in denial about the fact that we still > describe what was supposed to have been a democratic republic as such. > We now, in > fact, live in an increasingly crippling theocracy, in which our > Constitution > means less and less in such small increments that we are grateful for > the slow > erosion, lest we have to face the facts. Americans seem not to object > to living > in a tightening right-wing theocracy because this is what they have > chosen, > either by direct choice, or by choosing to let it happen.   This is one of the heresies to which I was alluding, to have replaced the church universal with the American national religion. Well said, Mr. Gluck!   Randy Runyon    
(back) Subject: PipeChat IRC this evening, From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 16:04:53 -0500   All members of PipeChat are invited to join us in the PipeChat IRC any Friday and Monday evening - beginning at 9.00 PM Eastern Time.   To find out more about the Chat room, or how to get into it, go to PipeChat-L web page at http://www.pipechat.org/   You will find out all you need to know to join us.   Tonight at 9.00 PM, - I hope that we will see you there.   Cheers,   Bob Conway     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Glatter Goetz From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 22:17:42 +0100   Hi list,   referring to various publications in Germany it seems that the organbuilder Glatter-Goetz, Owingen, Germany, had declared insolency/ . According to another source, the whole inventory of their shop in Owingen had been put up for public auction already last week, the declaration on insolvency must have happened already quite a while back. Does anybody know, whether this had to do with this huge Disney-Hall project? And, if Caspar Glatter Goetz was one of the contractors (or even the main contractor), who is now jumping in regarding any open obligations.   Anyway, a sad story again, after a somewhat interesting development after the brothers GG had separated.   HFH      
(back) Subject: RE: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours? From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 21:48:59 -0000   Good evening.   I do not look at the Gospel Readings or anything like that. I play seasonally. The Little Organ Book is naturally very useful for this.   I like to play a lot of arrangements, for example as its Lent, I am = playing some of the chorus' appropriate to lent from the Messiah (GFH) and some excerpts from St. M. Passion (JSB)   -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Desiree' Sent: 21 February 2005 04:38 To: PipeChat Subject: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours?   How do you plan your voluntaries? For February , I have been doing all French for Prelude and Postlude. In January I did as much Bach as possible. For March, Im doing Marches and Arias, with many of the arias being lyrical settings of Lenten hymns.   How do you plan yours?             __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Helps protect you from nasty viruses. http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Boston area From: "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 17:51:48 -0500   If you're going to be in the Boston area this Saturday, you might want to check out the Mini-Convention being held by the Merrimack Valley Chapter of the A.G.O. This is a very popular annual event. It will take place between 8:30 am and 4 pm, at the First Calvary Baptist Church (intersection of Route 125 and Massachusetts Avenue), North Andover. This is a short trip, not more than a half hour, from Boston. Events include a seminar on Brahms' organ and choral music; Martha Peabody, Vocal Techniques in the Context of Choir Practice; Enid Oberholzer, The TSCM Voice for Life choral scheme; and Dr. Joe Utterback, Applying Jazz Techniques to Familiar Hymn Tunes. For information email Barbara Owen at owenbar@juno.com. The cost is a modest $48 for the full day or $32 for a half day. INCLUDING lunch!   Hope to see you there.   David Baker    
(back) Subject: Finances From: "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 18:05:07 -0500   In addition to practicing music, I practice law. My primary emphasis is consumer bankruptcy. Organists/choir masters and people who work for religious institutions (or otherwise rely on them financially in some fashion) often live close to the line, financially speaking (right, Bud?). For them, and for thousands of people in all walks of life, the American bankruptcy system has provided a lifeline that has helped them save their homes from foreclosure and get a "fresh start" on their financial life.   I tend not to pay too much attention to what's happening in Congress because my philosophy is to cope with whatever is presented. Presently pending before Congress, however, is a major overhaul of the bankruptcy system that has been foisted on Congress - and all of us - by the big credit card companies. If the present bill is passed, it looks like it could be the end of a fair and equitable system - one that balances the needs of consumers to get financial help, with that of creditors who justly want to be paid what they legally are entitled to be paid. One commentator has suggested that the pending bill would push the country towards a major depression, if not actually into one.   If you have financial problems or know someone who does, you need to learn about this bill and decide for yourself whether to get involved and let your congressman know. The religious foundation of bankruptcy is surely familiar to us all - check out Deuteronomy 15 - so I hope this posting is not too far off topic.   I should say - as a matter of full disclosure - that while I think the bill is probably a bad thing, one good thing that might come out of it is that my fees would skyrocket! That, of course, is both good and bad. I don't mind charging higher fees; on the other hand, the bill might result in truly needy people being forced to do without the legal relief that they need.   Just thought the list should be made aware of this issue. Anybody with questions is free to email me off list.   David Baker    
(back) Subject: Re: Finances From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 17:19:53 -0600   Hello, David Baker:   > I should say - as a matter of full disclosure - that while I think the > bill is probably a bad thing, one good thing that might come out of it > is that my fees would skyrocket! That, of course, is both good and > bad. I don't mind charging higher fees; on the other hand, the bill > might result in truly needy people being forced to do without the legal > relief that they need.   What would they do to a person in bankruptcy who actually cannot pay back the money?   Debtor's prison??? Real or imposed on the families with collection activities into death and beyond?   F. Richard Burt     ..      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours? From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2005 07:49:29 +0800   I'm afraid I must confess that I play what takes my fancy on any = particular Sunday but paying some regard to the season of the year - i.e. Christmas = or Easter which are about the only season that we worry much about. Some of = the congregation members tell me they like a particular piece and I play that more frequently. I don't avoid playing a piece again after a few weeks. = Why should I? I like it and/or the congregation has someone that likes it so I =   play it again. We have another organist who plays the same six or eight pieces time after time, mostly from the Eight Little Preludes and Fugues. = I have heard the Little Prelude and Fugue in G minor so many times I almost scream when inevitably she plays it again after playing it last week and = the week before. There needs to be some variety but I can't see anything = against repeating a piece after six weeks or so. If there is a suitable voluntary written on the last hymn sung I may use that as a Postlude. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> To: "'PipeChat'" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Tuesday, February 22, 2005 5:48 AM Subject: RE: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours?     >     -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 266.1.0 - Release Date: 18/02/2005    
(back) Subject: Pipechat IRC From: <AEolianSkinner@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 19:37:53 EST   I know this may sound stupid to a few of you, but I can't seem to find the = room that the IRC is in. I ma mIRC but I can't find out what room yal are = in. Can someone explain?   Best Regards, Gregory Hinson    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipechat IRC From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 18:51:39 -0600   At 7:37 PM -0500 2/21/05, AEolianSkinner@aol.com wrote: >I know this may sound stupid to a few of you, but I can't seem to >find the room that the IRC is in. I ma mIRC but I can't find out >what room yal are in. Can someone explain? > >Best Regards, >Gregory Hinson   Gregory   If you use the following link http://www.pipechat.org/mirc.html you will find detailed instructions on how to set-up mIRC to connect to the PipeChat IRC Chat all courtesy of Adrianne Schutt, one of the "regulars" on #pipechat. She has included screen shots of exactly what to do in order to connect.   If you have problems you might try using your web browser and go to: http://irc.pipechat.org:8080/ and get into the room that way. Hopefully Ad will be around tonight and will be able to answer any questions and guide you if you need further help. She might even see your note to the list and might contact you prior to the start of our IRC chat which begins at 9:00 PM EASTERN time.   i should point out to everyone that the live chats can be accessed via the link above using your web browser if you want to see what goes on. But PLEASE, if you are new, sign in and introduce yourself. We don't bite!! <grin> Everyone is WELCOME.   David -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: RE: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours? From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 18:46:01 -0600   The Choirmaster's Handbook (now called something else, like the Episcopal Musician's Handbook) was very handy. It listed the scriptural readings and appropriate hymns (the latter being less precise than I liked). I used to keep up with my selected hymns and special music in the volume for historical reference. I ALWAYS reviewed the lessons and Gospel for the Sunday, the season, and special dates relating to composers (both in the Organist's Book of Days and my own listings) to select music. I generally placed a small blurb in the bulletin to explain the selections. I felt that was the least a paid musician with my responsibilities could do.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com          
(back) Subject: RE: sunrise services From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 19:02:31 -0600   I'm really confused - although I personally don't like sunrise services because I'm lazy, why are they theologically not sound?     Glenda Sutton   gksjd85@direcway.com        
(back) Subject: RE: Organ Voluntaries...how do you plan yours? From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 21:04:10 -0500   David Kenney writes:   >I am of the "camp" that sees each Sunday in Lent as "Alleluia" time, like "little Easters".   True, every Sunday is a little Easter, and daily Lenten disciplines can be relaxed on Sundays. =20   So when I was about age 12, I announced, only jokingly I hope, that I would give up watching the Wonderful World of Disney for Lent. But since it was a Sunday evening TV show, effectively I wouldn't need to give up anything.   Isn't singing Alleluia on Sundays in Lent, on the premise that it is a Little Easter, a similarly Jesuitical rationalization for ignoring the season, especially since most of us don't sing in church on any weekday, and the same tradition that prescribes Lent and Lenten disciplines is explicit that Alleluia is suppressed even on Sundays?   Somber in mood doesn't necessarily mean dreary. There is quite a lot of wonderful organ music whose mood is somber, in fact so eloquently, dramatically so that I would hesitate to play it in any other season. Yet only someone allergic to any music later than Franck would call it dreary. I was going to say, "later than Durufle", but in fact a fine example of what I have in mind IS by Durufle: Prelude from Suite op. 5. A congregant who can't at least acquire a taste for such repertoire will just have to think of it as a Lenten discipline, I'd suggest... :-) The Fourth Psalm prelude (on Psalm 130:1) by Howells... Hommage a Josquin des Pres by Grunenwald.... Elegy by Peeters... Litany by Myron Roberts... are a just a few other examples. This year, for the first Sunday I dusted off (after more decades than I want to think about) the second movement of William Mathias's worthy Partita-- which, in case you're skeptical, can even go in the bulletin as "Lento alla marcia," so there <wicked grin>. =20   Next Sunday's prelude shall be "Attende Domine" by Demessieux, because the choir plans to sing this chant ("The Lent Prose.") It's not dramatic, but it is beautiful.   In general, I look first for pieces based on hymn tunes used in the service and have been known to get a little upset if expected week after week to submit voluntaries before hearing what these are to be. (Nowadays the joy and privilege of picking them is mine, so when this happens I have only my alternate personalities to blame :-) However, I'm not as uncritical or habitual about this as I used to be: such a deluge of more-or-less cheap, sloppy, ephemeral material catering to such a desire has been published recently, and I can't always resist buying and cataloging it, that this objective has usually become absurdly easy to accomplish. If I were worth my salt, I could improvise as well or better than a lot of that stuff, I must think. If one takes every opportunity now that one might have done twenty years ago to "tie the organ music in" like this, one might seldom get around to playing better-written free pieces, and that neglect would be an impoverishing cop-out. There are always other considerations, such as the lections or their collective pastoral theme, or first-rate literature meant for the season in general, or even key associations.   Overall, I try to provide a good balance of schools of composition over a period of time. It's probably a good idea that I don't use often enough, to concentrate on one school for a service (e.g. prelude and postlude in the same school or even by the same composer) but to play from the same school or series regularly for several weeks in succession sounds like too academic an approach for "the handmaid of the liturgy."      
(back) Subject: Re: Finances From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 21 Feb 2005 21:13:42 EST   David,   This bad bill is not new--though it may have some aspects that are new. = They tried to get this out of committee a few years ago. It is very = destructive, very anti-consumer, and indeed, anti-people, as far as I am concerned. As = I understand it, people with ANY future earning power whatsoever would be = forced to work out a payment schedule with say, a credit card company, on a reduced scale but the company could CONTINUE to charge interest and fees. One = could be paying down a debt one could never pay off, for interest and fees. I feel = the same way about the proposed legislation on medical malpractice suits.   This is indeed relevant to our profession. We should all take a look at = this bill, then write our congressmen and senators, whatever side we're on.   Pax, Bill H. Boston