PipeChat Digest #5173 - Wednesday, February 23, 2005
 
Christa Rakich at Second Congregational Church Hartford
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
Bach and Skinner
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
musicianship
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Recording the Organ (and Choirs too!)
  by "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com>
Glenda's recital
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Alan and Sunrise Services
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Allen Organ Advertisment
  by "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca>
Re: Allen Organ Advertisment
  by "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net>
Re : "authorities"
  by "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr>
RE: Bach and Skinner
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
Marche Triomphale - Karg-Elert
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
SAVILLE SOVEREIGN ORGAN AVAILABLE (x post)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
RE: to repeat or not to repeat...
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
WurliTzer Hour at Radio City Music Hall
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
 

(back) Subject: Christa Rakich at Second Congregational Church Hartford From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 09:28:13 -0500   Just to keep my previous report of this concert complete, I have learned the name of the composer of the encore piece Ms. Rakich played, thanks to her.It was Nocturne by Germaine Tailleferre. A lovely piece I might = add.   Cheers, Mack  
(back) Subject: Bach and Skinner From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 09:07:45 -0600   Ross wrote:   =20   >I wonder if the same is true in the USA? From my own very limited experience of American instruments, I >wonder if Skinner has been grossly over-rated tonally? He certainly contributed nothing to ordinary organs >for the classical music of the organ, as far as I can judge, but tried to create something symphonic of >very little real musical use, orchestral if you like but hopeless for Bach or even for accompanying choirs >or congregations.=20   =20   Ross,   =20   Despite the fact that I am far from expert on Skinner organs-or indeed anything at all-I would like to make a reply in response to this part of your posting. =20   =20   It is my understanding that one of the reasons that Skinner excelled was because he designed organs that worked well in the drier acoustics of American churches and auditoriums. I don't think that you could expect any organ by Cavaille-Coll, Silberman, or Lewis to be as effective in a comparatively less reverberant acoustic. In addition to being responses to musical ideas of their times and places, organs by these masters were responses to buildings and acoustical situations-and necessarily so. The same goes for Skinner. He responded both to the musical ideals of his time (and far be it from me to deem those ideals "unmusical") and to the acoustical situations typical for the installation of the majority of his instruments.=20   =20   It would be my hope that in today's times we would have learned from both the successes and mistakes of Skinner, and indeed, all builders. No, you can't play Bach on a Skinner, but then, you couldn't play Lemare on a Silberman. But then again, aren't we placing ourselves in boxes already again? I'll bet you CAN play Bach on a Skinner!   =20   Daniel Hancock   Springfield, Missouri   =20  
(back) Subject: musicianship From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 09:10:03 -0600   >One of the most satisfying aspects of organ playing for me is finding the >beautiful (or most musical) sounds each instrument offers. Finding >pleasing sounds on a generic or mundane organ says as much about >musicianship as technique, sometimes more. Just my opinion...   Well said, and a good approach! True creativity at work can surmount many obstacles, even if you have to break "the rules" to do it--and usually, you do!   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Recording the Organ (and Choirs too!) From: "Jerry Richer" <jerry@ChirpingBat.Com> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 10:12:50 -0500   For convenience in portable audio recording I use my laptop with my Edirol UA-25 or Tascam US-122 and Sony stereo microphone or my Radio Shack stereo condenser lavaliere mics. This makes me totally portable and unobtrusive with an easy but high quality setup. The Edirol UA-25 and Tascam US-122 are high quality small USB powered microphone preamps that will accommodate two XLR or 1/4 microphones and provide 48 Volt phantom power. The Edirol UA-25 costs $225.00, includes USA shipping at Chirping Bat and can be found at: Http://www.chirpingbat.com/edirol.shtml The Tascam US-122 costs $189.00, includes USA shipping at Chirping = Bat and can be found at: http://www.tascam.com/Products/US-122.html   Chirp|Chirp|Chirp: It's the Bat, Chirping Bat .Com    
(back) Subject: Glenda's recital From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 09:13:56 -0600   Glenda wrote: People will hear Bach and Mendelssohn like they've never heard it before, and probably hope never to again.     First of all, congratulations, Glenda! I daresay this change in your life is entirely well-thought out, and will position you for greater success and happiness.   It is always of great interest to me to hear from others on the list that have day-jobs in other professions, and yet manage to keep up a repertoire on the organ. I applaud your hard work, and wish you the best for your recital.   By the way, that one-liner of yours above was simply great.   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Alan and Sunrise Services From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 10:32:41 +0000   On 2/23/05 3:14 AM, "First Christian Church of Casey, IL" <kzrev@rr1.net> wrote:   > I think I see where you're coming from now re: Sunrise Services. However= , I > suspect very few of the churches which energetically endorse and do Sunri= se > Services have a Vigil service; they tend to fall in different theological > traditions, so the Sunrise crowd isn't already exhausted from a long vigi= l. > Around here I rarely hear of a vigil outside the Catholic tradition. Whe= n I > lived in a city with forty+ Lutheran churches, only the flagship ELCA > congregation had a vigil--and it was a 30 minute early evening service.   Yes, Pastor. You've got it perfectly. What I couldn=B9t seem to convey in ten paragraphs you=B9ve summarized beautifully in a couple of sentences.   It=B9s a whole =8Cnother theological tradition. And your description of that other city (possibly Detroit?) is not surprising at all=8Bespecially if it wa= s ten or twenty years ago.   Today it may be somewhat different. My first Vigil was about 1963, in rura= l North Dakota, and maybe ran ten minutes, just =B3tacked on=B2 to the front end of the Sunday morning service. But NOW, in Manhattan, the ELCA churches ar= e quite blunt about being militantly and explicitly IN the catholic tradition= , and it=B9s pretty obviously true. Major Vigils, done to a T, and no sunrise anything. =20   Twenty or thirty years ago the phrase =B3more catholic than the pope=B2 was sai= d in humor. Now, there are quite a few communities where it has come true. (On the other hand, there are quite a few RC preachers who can out-preach the neighboring Lutheran preacher!)   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organ Advertisment From: "Russ Greene" <rggreene2@shaw.ca> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 09:43:21 -0600   Hi Paul, My problem with Allen is that I'm electrically savvy enough to know=20 that the processed reverb effect is complete at the time it is sent to=20=   an amplifier and then to a speaker; similarly, the antiphonal signal is=20=   complete at the time it is sent to an amplifier and then to a speaker.=20=   There is no reason that both signals cannot be sent to a mixer, then to=20=   a single (or stereo pair) amplifier, then to a single (or single pair)=20=   of speakers.   Since the extra cost of a separate set of speakers and amps which Allen=20=   insists must be dedicated to antiphonal use is several thousand dollars=20=   and the benefit marginal, I'm not willing to go that route. We'll see=20 how it all shakes down; it's enough of an issue (I LOATHE being taken=20 for a fool) that we could well end up with some other brand of organ in=20=   spite of me being an Allen booster for many, many years.   Russ Greene     On Feb 22, 2005, at 3:24 PM, Paul Valtos wrote:   > Dear Russ, > =A0=A0=A0=A0 I will bet that the system that would send the signal to = the=20 > antiphonal speakers is just the reverb effect and not the entire=20 > signal generated by the organ. You have that same choice when using=20 > Alesis where you can adjust the amount of true signal versus the=20 > reverb effect through the channels you choose to use the Alesis on. I=20=   > would bet that the Acoustical Portrait system does not allow the true=20=   > signal to process past the "black box." Just a guess though. Just ask=20=   > for two more channels, a switching mechanism and an extra set of=20 > speakers to parallel the suggested system. > =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0= =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0= =A0=A0=A0=A0=A0=A0 Paul=  
(back) Subject: Re: Allen Organ Advertisment From: "Paul Valtos" <chercapa@enter.net> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 11:10:28 -0500   Dear Russ, Maybe you could talk Allen (at the company level) to put in a = control that sends both signal and reverb effect to the antiphonal = channels. I've thought of that by rewiring the Alesis units and putting = a switch (probably stop tab) at the console to go to full signal from = the units. My ideas and my fortitude in follow through are not the same. = That would require me to cut a slot in the stop rail to accomodate it = and the rethinking and rewiring of the Alesis units. I would like to = have used this channel,channels to make a separate trumpet channel but = there are other stops on that channel so it would also require me to = remember what else was there and not use those stops when I wanted to = have a so called antiphonal trumpet. Considering that I am 63 my Allen = Theatre III is probably the last organ that I will purchase so "leave = well enough alone." I went from 5 channels when I bought the organ to 9 = channels, two antiphonal. The first two channels were created to get the = strings out of the reed channel. Made a huge difference. Oh well. Good = luck but I would talk to the boys in tech services at Allen directly.=20 Paul ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Russ Greene=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Wednesday, February 23, 2005 10:43 AM Subject: Re: Allen Organ Advertisment     Hi Paul, My problem with Allen is that I'm electrically savvy enough to know = that the processed reverb effect is complete at the time it is sent to = an amplifier and then to a speaker; similarly, the antiphonal signal is = complete at the time it is sent to an amplifier and then to a speaker. = There is no reason that both signals cannot be sent to a mixer, then to = a single (or stereo pair) amplifier, then to a single (or single pair) = of speakers.   Since the extra cost of a separate set of speakers and amps which = Allen insists must be dedicated to antiphonal use is several thousand = dollars and the benefit marginal, I'm not willing to go that route. = We'll see how it all shakes down; it's enough of an issue (I LOATHE = being taken for a fool) that we could well end up with some other brand = of organ in spite of me being an Allen booster for many, many years.   Russ Greene     On Feb 22, 2005, at 3:24 PM, Paul Valtos wrote:     Dear Russ, I will bet that the system that would send the signal to the = antiphonal speakers is just the reverb effect and not the entire signal = generated by the organ. You have that same choice when using Alesis = where you can adjust the amount of true signal versus the reverb effect = through the channels you choose to use the Alesis on. I would bet that = the Acoustical Portrait system does not allow the true signal to process = past the "black box." Just a guess though. Just ask for two more = channels, a switching mechanism and an extra set of speakers to parallel = the suggested system. Paul
(back) Subject: Re : "authorities" From: "John Foss" <harkat@kat.forthnet.gr> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 18:26:04 +0200   Well Ross and list members,   It's a pity Colin is not here to join in this discussion!   "I am not keen on Willis organs, even from the blessed (joke) Father = Henry, for without the reeds they'd be not much at all, not even beginning to measure up to the flues of T.C.Lewis, Harrison & Harrison or even Walker = or Hill, to name a few, whatever Willis's technical cleverness and workmanship."   I have played a lot of organs in the UK, including instruments by = Harrison, Walker's, Hill, Hunter etc. The best Walker organs are first rate - Romsey =   Abbey (1858) and others - particularly between 1960 and 1970 - St John's, Islington, The Italian Church, Clerkenwell, Brompton Oratory and so on, though others are less inspired - I don't particularly care for St Columba's, Pont Street, and of the two organs I learnt on at school, I preferred the Harrison to the Walker. We can say that about all good = quality builders. Some of their instruments are better than others - location or whatever.   I cannot remember having played a bad organ by Harrison's, and my = experience of Willis organs is obviously happier than yours. I am afraid that I = cannot agree that Willis did not make good flue work. Willis organs which I have played regularly and have given me considerable pleasure include Oxford = Town Hall (IV/35) where I used to practise when I was auditing the accounts of the Oxford UniversityPress ( see "Why accountancy is not boring ....." ) = The flue choruses are excellent, voiced by the hand of a master. The same goes =   for St Dominic's Priory, Haverstock Hill 1883 (III/35) and a strange = church in Hackney which seems to change its name from time to time, currently called, I think, The Church of the Good Shepherd, a beautiful 1896 (II/14) =   which just sings! Union Chapel, Islington 1877 (III/37) ..... the list is =   endless. No, Father Willis built magnificent organs and some of those by his successors are not too bad either!   Reminiscing about Noel Bonavia Hunt, he came on one occasion to Harrow School Speech Room to a recital - I think it may have been The Organ Club = or the London Association of Organists when I was at school there. Alfred Champness, one time organ scholar at a college in Oxford (I should = remember which - I was a guest of Alfred's for dinner last year - he has a 2 manual =   tracker action organ in his living room by William Blake of Buckfast of = the type I always hate playing! It's invariably after a good meal and several glasses of wine in front of a "ditinguished" audience!) Anyway, he made a bee-line for N B-H and his words have stuck in my memory to this day "It = is a pleasure to meet someone with whose ideas I could not disagree more!"   On the topic of Cecil Clutton, I knew Sam well. He had his failings, but = his enthusiasm for organs was real. He asked me to give a recital to = inaugurate the 2 manual Mander organ he had installed in the basement of his house in =   Blackheath. (see ... of the type I always hate playing! above!!) and I = made some recordings for him at St Mary, Rotherhithe - another wonderful organ = - for a BBC broadcast on Historical British Organs. In view of this I cannot =   dispute your saying that he "had a good ear"!   Perhaps I should modify my comment on the "type I always hate playing", by =   saying that generally speaking, tracker action organs in small rooms are very demanding on the player! Given plenty of time to practise they are usually very good for you, but not in front of an audience after a good dinner!   John Foss http://www.organsandorganistsonline.com/ http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/orgofftop/      
(back) Subject: RE: Bach and Skinner From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 08:27:39 -0800   Daniel's comments about Skinner's organs being well-designed for drier acoustics is indeed correct.   John Hendriksen, now simi-retired but for many years during the Harrison/Whiteford eras at Aeolian-Skinner he served as head flue voicer, and he told me that during the late 60's-70's many builders mistakenly started relating pipe scales to building size. He proved to me by example that in small dry rooms, a large scale Diapason would be much more supportive and build a better foundation for a principal chorus with = mixture than a narrow "neo-baroque" Principal would.   I have a perfect example of a situation such as you described above. = There is a large Presbyterian church in Memphis Tennessee that had a famous 1927 E. M. Skinner. When I played the organ it had gone through some moderate tonal changes in the late 40's by Aeolian-Skinner (mostly reed revoicing,) and Moller had replaced the EMS great which had no upperwork and several large-scale Diapasons with a new American Classic style great.   At the point I experienced the organ there were ensemble issues due to divergent styles opposing each other. However, the organ still had the original (very large) Skinner swell (save for revoiced reeds, still very English in style,) with Geigen Diapason 8, and on up to a beautiful, = subtle V Chorus Mixture, and fabulous reeds. It was a 4/50'ish and there were = many beautiful tones and I can easily see with that swell and even the original upperwork-less great, you could indeed play Bach. The pedal Trombone was fabulous!   The room was not dead, nor was it reverberant. Several years later a very stylish French-Romantic style instrument was installed with Barker-lever = and it was reported that the scales and voicing treatments were exact copies = of the French example. That instrument was played by a nationally known recitalist at a regional AGO convention, and the effect to me (and others) was similar to a badly finished neo-baroque organ or a digital instrument where the sounds come "AT" you. I remember being upset that the Skinner = was not sympathetically rebuilt before hearing the new organ, and at the = concert on the new, I felt justified. I am not dashing the workmanship of the new organ there, and perhaps a successor to the organist who mistakenly pushed that thing through has had the voicing modified so that it sounds better - that could be accomplished I am sure, as the negative effects were almost totally due to the screechy mixtures and brash reeds. The "fonds" were = quite lovely.   I know of another location here locally where I heard the organ in a = totally uncarpeted, unpadded original setting and thought it sounded pretty good. The pews needed replacing and when that happened the new ones were totally padded. I turned the organ on, played a verse of a hymn, turned it off = and never looked back. I worked at that church as facilities manager for two years due to the need for medical benefits. It would have been normal for me to spend a few minutes a day at the organ just as a "break," but it was so bad it was literally too much trouble to fight the roll-top and turn = the thing on.   Thankfully, I think we are generally past the era such as the Memphis = organ being replaced at incredible cost with something much less successful. = I'm not sure we will ever get enough people educated to prevent such incidents as minor building renovations being carried out without regard to the resulting effects on acoustics/etc.   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California        
(back) Subject: Marche Triomphale - Karg-Elert From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 17:17:14 -0000   Dear all, does anyone have a PDF file of the above piece which they could send me?   Thanks.    
(back) Subject: SAVILLE SOVEREIGN ORGAN AVAILABLE (x post) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 12:48:30 -0500   My apologies for the previous blank post. I am writing this on an = unfamiliar computer.   I have a Saville Sovereign organ available for the taking. It was = originally installed in Woodland Presbyterian Church here in Memphis in = the 1970s, and it was installed in my home in early November. I am = offering it now because I have acquired a studio pipe organ. New owner to = remove from my East Memphis home (see below.)   The Saville organ has a full two-manual AGO walnut console, divided = expression (Great/Pedal and Swell), Crescendo Pedal, right combination = pistons with digital readout, music rack and pedal clavier lights and key = switch.   The organ sounds rather incredible, has full couplers and has the = capability of filling a small church or chapel very adequately. Savilles = were not overly unified as Rodgers and Allens of this same vintage were. = The stop list is as follows (typed from memory since I am currently not = home):   GREAT 8 Principal, 8 Bourdon, 8 Gemshorn, 4 Octave, 4 Flute, 2 Super Octave, = Mixture IV, Tremulant, Chimes Great to Great 16, Unison Off, 4 Swell to Great 16, 8 and 4   SWELL 8 Gedeckt, 8 Viola de Gamba, 8 Viola Celeste, 4 Prestant, 4 Flute, 2-2/3 Nazard, 2 Piccolo, 1-1/3 Quint, 8 Trompette, 8 Oboe, Tremulant Swell to Swell 16, Unison Off, 4   PEDAL 16 Violone, 16 Subbass, 16 Lieblich Gedeckt, 8 Octave, 8 Flute, 4 Choral Bass, 16 Bassoon, 8 Trumpet Great to Pedal 8 and 4 Swell to Pedal 8 and 4   The audio includes two pedal resonating "towers" each about 4' high with = 12' sub-woofers. The manual divisions each have a 3' round "disc" to = which are mounted 5 speakers. The new owner may wish to build enclosures = or legs or mount the manual cabinets in some manner.   I did some preliminary voicing when it arrived in November and that made a = VAST improvement over the way it had been regulated and leveled in the = church. The stops are independently capable of being voiced in TWO = separate ways.   * * * THE ORGAN MUST BE REMOVED BY THE MIDDLE OR END OF NEXT WEEK, and = definitely NO LATER THAN Thursday, March 3 or it will be taken away. * * * =   Again, new owner to remove or have moved out of my home.   Please contact me at (901) 682-3077 or (901) 259-3262 as soon as possible = if interested. First come, first served.   Thank you! Scott Foppiano, Memphis, TN  
(back) Subject: RE: to repeat or not to repeat... From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 13:23:07 -0500   Randy Terry writes:   > Pieces like that or some of the Bach CP's always bear repeating. I never fail to play "Wachet auf!" on the first Sunday of Advent, but have never felt any reason the congregation HAD to learn the hymn.   Yes, there are seasonal pieces that I wouldn't mind repeating every year, and most years I do play them. Bach's Wachet Auf is a fine example. But then, so are all four Advent chorale preludes in the Orgelbuechlein, and Bach's ornamented "Nun komm" from the Great 18, Distler's partita on Wachet auf, the first movement of Dupre's Symphonie-Passion. Tournemire has a nice suite for the Third Sunday in Advent, which like all the masses in L'Orgue Mystique should be played only on the day intended. What have I missed? Oh yes, Sowerby's beautiful chorale prelude on "Veni Emmanuel" beckons alluringly for whatever Sunday that hymn is sung. The first piece of Demessieux's book of Gregorian pieces, "Rorate Coeli" is lovely. While I haven't found any organ pieces using "Conditor alme siderum" per se that absolutely bowl me over, it's one of my favorite melodies and deserves to be marked with organ music especially when it is sung. Third Sunday? Fine, go with the Tournemire. Bach's prelude is sterling, of course, but very short. How about the versets by Titelouze? Conditor alme is one of the few melodies he set that many people sing anymore. =20   There just isn't opportunity to play all of these annually. So what to do? To say goodbye to any of them because one has decided to play some of the others *every* year would be rather heartbreaking. And of course, Advent is just a for-instance. Every season has an equivalent embarrassment of riches.=20   > I don't feel that one should refrain from repeating certain organ voluntaries... If I don't play Vaughan Williams' "Rohysmedre" often enough, I have a church member who asks for it. This is a good thing, I think.   Hmm, you have an interesting point there: people, including me, like what they know (although I also like exploring music that I don't yet know). I have trouble remembering any parishioner ever requesting a voluntary by name because he or she liked it, other than one friend years ago who *loved* Alain's Litanies. To how many of us has this happened, and how often do you repeat a voluntary? It would be worth a scholarly study to determine, if possible, whether there is a meaningful correlation. Whatever you do that causes your people to regard your preludes and postludes as something with more shape and identity than so much water out of a faucet is commendable, and we should all go and do likewise.   In my student days, I used to plan and written records of everything I played to the extent that my classmates thought I was crazy and teased me about it. Since then, I'm afraid I've become lazier at least for the tail end of Communion voluntaries, because one doesn't know in advance what one will have a chance to use. This goes especially when working with a go-getter of a choir director who likes motets, hymns, bell-ringing, you-name-it during the same period. So I have taken to keeping Benoit's book of elevations handy for "fillers"-- going through it and using a paper clip as a book mark. It is close enough to water-faucet music to be relatively little sacrilege to invent a cadence somewhere in the middle of the page if needed. There's no danger of going through the whole book within a year. But sometimes I probably forget to move the paper clip and in the middle of playing a piece think, "hmm, didn't I play this a couple weeks ago?" If I can't answer that question myself, how realistic is it to suppose that anyone else will mind?   My feeling basically with organ music is that there's so much great repertoire out there that we should want to cover it rather than repeat. My attitude with choral music is different: choirs should have repertoires that are ideally large enough to avoid repeating much within a year, but turn over only some 25% from year to year. The greatest cathedral choirs in the world see fit to work this way, even though they can give a polished account of almost anything just by sight-reading. So if the director of the cocks and hens in the chancel choir on Main Street has some kind of compulsion that everything must be new, and repeating any anthem within five years would be a sin, he's probably giving them a succession of schlock. He should get over it and teach them one new piece a month that is challenging and interesting enough to wear well.  
(back) Subject: WurliTzer Hour at Radio City Music Hall From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Wed, 23 Feb 2005 14:08:05 -0500   I just wanted to say thank you to Steve Lawson, who posted this event to the lists, other than Theatreorgans-L, which I am not a member, and the New York Theatre Organ Society for organizing this event.   I have been touting the "Chinatown Bus" that operates between Boston and New York City for some time now, but have never used it. Well this finally changed. I took the Fung Wah Bus from Boston to New York City on Saturday so that I could attend this event. I have some recordings of the main organ but had never heard it live. I must say I was not dissapointed. Bernie Anderson and Dave Koop did an excellent job showing off the organ to an appreciative crowd of about 200 I believe.   It was also nice that those of us with hand-held recording devices were allowed to record the event too, which I took advantage of and now have a current demonstration of the rebuilt organ. Thank you Thank you NYTOS and Radio City Music Hall for making this day memorable for me, at least. I only hope it will not be another 26 years before we hear the organ solo again and hopefully both consoles will be working then.   Cheers, Mack From Boston