PipeChat Digest #5177 - Friday, February 25, 2005
 
Ernest M. Skinner
  by "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com>
Blended Worship
  by "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net>
Re: American Oddities
  by "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net>
Karg-Elert
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
Re: Ernest M. Skinner
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
Wanamaker Pipe Organ Hour
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
June, 1988 "Diapason"
  by "Richard Ditewig" <rwditewig@msn.com>
RE: Blended worship music
  by "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>
RE: MOVEMENT IN CHURCH
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
Catholic vs non-catholic Ave Marias??
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
Family Day at Church [marginally on-topic]
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Re: Karg-Elert
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Karg-Elert
  by "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk>
orchestral voices in the organ
  by "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net>
Re: Catholic vs non-catholic Ave Marias??
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Wanamaker Pipe Organ Hour info sought
  by "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net>
RE: Blended worship music
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
Re: Blended Worship
  by "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com>
 

(back) Subject: Ernest M. Skinner From: "Will Scarboro" <whs1325@yahoo.com> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 05:24:50 -0800 (PST)   Dear list, The rational behind E.M. Skinner's orchestral voices is quite simple. = Skinner was a music lover. He enjoyed all kinds of music with a passion. = At the end of the 19th century he looked at the organ and saw an = instrument devoid of the color, timbre and musical expression that he = heard in the orchestra and thought the organ should benefit from the = addition of these voices. So he spent years conducting experiments with = different types of organ pipes and voicing techniques until each of his = orchestral voices was a true representation of the orchestral instrument. = His reasons for adding orchestral voices to the organ were purly musical = ones. The organ as an instrument has always been associated with the = orchestra, even before Skinners time there were orchestral voices in the = organ. Some people might say that this association between the organ and = orchestra is a stigma but I say that it is one of the instruments greatest = assets. Many of the great composers of organ music wrote for the intrument because of this asset. Now as for E.M and Bach, Skinner always said that if Bach were alive in = Skinner's day he would have embraced the Skinner organ. He mentions that = Bach was unsatisfied with the organ of his time and usually augmented it's = sound with orchestral instruments. Bach may or may not have added = orchestral instruments for the reasons Skinner mentioned but it is a fact = that Bach wasn't totally happy with the organ of his time. Surly if Bach = had lived in Skinner's day he would have written for the organ in a very = different way. In fact, Louis Vierne once said after playing Skinner = organs during his tour of the U.S. in the 1920's that if he had had that = type of instrument when he was a young man it would have totally changed = his style of composition. Lastly, I just can't understand why organists can't be glad for the = instrument they play on and adapt the music they play accordingly. Why are = we like this? Always wishing for something else. You wouldn't go into an = art museum and look at a Monet and say "gee, that's nice but I wish it = were a Gauguin instead". I just don't understand this habit that we = organists have of always wishing for something different then what we = have. Oh well, I feel better now having vented so I'll step off my soap box. = Back to school work now.... Sincerely, Will Scarboro     Will Scarboro   -musica pro populus- --------------------------------- Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Helps protect you from nasty viruses.
(back) Subject: Blended Worship From: "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:15:07 -0600   At Sturgeon Bay Moravian Church (Sturgeon Bay, WI), we primarily use the Moravian Book of Worship. Because we have a strong church camp = tradition, there is that body of hymnody that holds a special place in the hearts = of many young and old Moravians. I have found the book RENEW: Hymns and = Songs for Blended Worship to be a useful supplementary. I know that many denominations have gone to a contemporary supplement, and this one has served us well. I am fortunate to be the one to select the hymns, so I control just how blended we get. I know that the true definition of "blending" is much more complicated than my take on it. My idea of = blending is to simply offer a variety of hymnody styles. For instance, this = Sunday we will sing one traditional hymn known to many denominations, one traditional hymn from the Moravian heritage, and the contemporary hymn = "As the Deer." I feel comfortable leading the contemporary hymns on the = organ or piano, and I have found the congregation to welcome either = instrument. Perhaps this plan means that I am guilty of trying to please all of the people all of the time, but it seems to work for us. =20   Bob Nickel       > Someone on the Ship of Fools had a good suggestion yesterday (tried=20 > and true somewhere in Canada): "Blend" by starting the worship with an =   > informal sing-a-long, complete with guitars, praise band, whatever=20 > floats their boat for ten or fifteen minutes; then begin the liturgy=20 > and keep the proceedings strictly traditional throughout the remainder =   > of the service. Does anyone here have experience with that approach?   --    
(back) Subject: Re: American Oddities From: "John Seboldt" <rohrwerk@seboldt.net> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:17:51 -0600   Somebody wrote: >When I used to play in a Catholic church, I had to deal with a > > phenomenon known as the "Polka Mass." A local polka band would provide > music for the Mass. The words to the hymns were reprinted in a = "bulletin." > All the tunes were polka tunes. I was normally just told, "Um, you = won't > have to play for Mass on such-and-such a day. We're having a polka = Mass." > I wouldn't go anywhere near the place that day, but I was always told it = was > a capacity crowd. > > Bob Nickel   Ah, yes. In most of the Catholic places I dealt with, it faded away. But not everywhere.   I do remember a rather interesting statement on "Polka Masses" from the worship office of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis. They chose not to make any real strong pronouncement of "good" or "bad" or "inappropriate," but re-stated some principles of liturgy drawn from all the usual documents and scholars. Such as: "Is the music to be sung familiar enough for everyone to join in the singing?" "Are all the most important parts of the liturgy sung in a setting all can join in on?"   And the one that made me laugh the most: "Is the vesture of the liturgical ministers appropriate?" In other words, do you really want these outlandish sequined polka kings' jackets up near the altar?   According to one source, this idea came from the Minnesota "Iron Range" territory, from some priest up there in the 70's. This is not one of those true ethnic Polish things - far from it, according to one dyed-in-the-wool Polish-American priest (Paul Jaroszewski) I worked with, and then he proceeded to sing one of those wonderful Polish devotional hymns he grew up with (now THERE'S the true ethnic tradition).   John Seboldt Milwaukee, WI www.seboldt.net/choralevensong  
(back) Subject: Karg-Elert From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 08:47:24 -0600   "A Cycle of Eight Short Pieces," op. 154, concludes with a one-page "Corale" which goes from ff with 6-voice chords to ffff with 9 and 10 voices. The chord progressions could fairly be called 'dramatic.'       MAF     Yes--that is the piece I'm looking for...any idea on a publisher or where to get it? I've been unsuccessful looking at the websites of Kalmus, Schott, etc., but perhaps with the collection name and opus number I can have better luck.   Thanks--   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri  
(back) Subject: Re: Ernest M. Skinner From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 09:36:51 -0600   Supporters of a more classical style of organ should not be under the = illusion that there was anything new about conceiving organ voices = orchestrally like this. In eighteenth-century England voluntaries for = solo voices, such as Flute Pieces, Cornet Voluntaries, Horn Voluntaries = and Trumpet Voluntaries were universally conceived as orchestral pieces. = In those days, for example, the valveless orchestral horns could only = play in D major and F major, and the valveless trumpets could only play = in C and D. Organ voluntaries for Horn and Trumpet are almost = invariably in these keys. (I know of only one exception -- Francis = Lindley's Trumpet Voluntary in A major. Lindley was blind and may not = have read the standard treatises on the subject, though Stanley also was = blind and clearly had!) Even accidentals were mostly impracticable, and = so Trumpet Voluntaries avoided accidentals as far as possible and never = modulated. Where it was deemed desirable to modulate, this would be = done on another manual or with another solo stop, and not on the = Trumpet. The Flute and the Cornet (based on the reedless medieval = instrument and not the later brass instrument) could modulate at will. = For example, William Walond's Trumpet Voluntary (Op. 2 No. 4), has two = pages of Trumpet with not a single accidental, then a page of modulation = on the Flute, and then the Trumpet section repeats. Even the rhythms, = etc., of the pieces reflect the character of pieces written for the solo = instrument. You cannot get any more orchestral than that. The only = difference with Ernest Skinner was that by his day the technology of = reedmaking had improved immensely since the eighteenth century, and his = reeds therefore sounded more like the real thing than those of Byfield = and Snetzler, who would probably have been stunned by the Skinner = product.   John Speller ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Will Scarboro=20 To: Pipechat=20 Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 7:24 AM Subject: Ernest M. Skinner     Dear list,   The rational behind E.M. Skinner's orchestral voices is quite simple. = Skinner was a music lover. He enjoyed all kinds of music with a passion. = At the end of the 19th century he looked at the organ and saw an = instrument devoid of the color, timbre and musical expression that he = heard in the orchestra and thought the organ should benefit from the = addition of these voices.=20    
(back) Subject: Wanamaker Pipe Organ Hour From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 11:47:10 EST   Greetings; For those of us with failing memories, could someone on the list refresh = us as to the time, date, and source of the once a month Wanamaker Pipe Organ = Hour program? Thanks, Stan Krider (I did remember to sign this post, didn't I)  
(back) Subject: June, 1988 "Diapason" From: "Richard Ditewig" <rwditewig@msn.com> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 09:05:18 -0800   does anyone out there have the June, 1988 issue of "The Diapason"? I'm = looking for a letter to the editor by William Wrenn, a student of Claire = Coci.   our public library here discarded all back issues prior to 1989.   thanks,   Richard Ditewig
(back) Subject: RE: Blended worship music From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 12:15:18 -0500   Jan Nijhuis writes:   >The idea is to minimize the number of people movements, so we keep the vocalists/instrumentalists up front at the beginning of worship -- they sing the first hymn, stand for the call to worship and lead the praise choruses. Whoever will play the offertory is expected to remain up front off stage, but at the ready until he/she needs to play.   Interesting, but what's wrong with people moving around in church? Make a virtue of necessity.   Where I live, they can become PROCESSIONS. You know, "Onward Christian soldiers... with the cross of Jesus going on before" (not to mention maybe even tapers and incense). We love'em :-)   Quentin Crisp say: when you start going bald, shave your head!      
(back) Subject: RE: MOVEMENT IN CHURCH From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 09:40:32 -0800   Someone once said when discussing the virtues of [un]carpeted isles:   "The sound of footsteps making their way to the altar ought to be = considered a joyous event!"   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California        
(back) Subject: Catholic vs non-catholic Ave Marias?? From: "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 12:42:43 -0500   Somehow I have the feeling that I've seen or heard this referred to sometime in the last few months, but I've searched all over and can't find =   it. Sorry if I'm asking something that's right in front of my nose. My grandfather-in-law died last Friday, and you know how dumb the resulting whirlwind can make a person. :/   The funeral home's liason was absolutely amazing, a truly gentle man so suited for his job that I cannot say enough praise. During one of the wakes, we were discussing music, and he mentioned a conversation he'd had recently with the funeral director....quote: "He said there are 2 Ave Marias, one by Schubert and one by someone else, and the catholic church only allows one of them, but he didn't know which."   We were clueless...I've always avoided catholicism, and my catholic in-laws can barely tell Amazing Grace from On Top Of Old Smokey.   I'll be sending Aaron a Thank You card early next week, and it would be wonderful if I could do something nice for him by including a quick guide to which Ave Maria is which and why there's a difference. If anybody = knows the answer, it's this group. I'd be really grateful if someone would clue =   me in.   Thanks, Ad        
(back) Subject: Family Day at Church [marginally on-topic] From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 09:53:47 -0800   [sent to me by a non-organist friend -- true story!]     For a special family-day service, I invited my parents to join me at my church. Unlike theirs, mine uses an overhead projector for the words to new hymns to appear on a screen for the whole congregation to see. All through the singing, and even after, I could see my mom beaming. When I asked her how she liked the service, she answered, "It was wonderful, but my favorite part was the karaoke!"    
(back) Subject: Re: Karg-Elert From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 10:22:51 -0800     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 6:47 AM Subject: Karg-Elert     > "A Cycle of Eight Short Pieces," op. 154, concludes with a one-page >"Corale" which goes from ff with 6-voice chords to ffff with 9 and 10 >voices. The chord progressions could fairly be called 'dramatic.'   The edition I have was published by The Arthur P. Schmidt Co., Boston, Mass., copyright 1934. Catalog number seems to be 14658a-h. The pieces = are: 1. Introitus 2. Gagliarda 3. Melodia monastica 4. Aria semplice 5. Apassionata 6. Canzona solenne 7. Toccatina 8. Corale. The Toccatina = and Corale seem also to have been published as a separate set.   MAF      
(back) Subject: Re: Karg-Elert From: "Bruce Miles" <bruce@gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 18:23:00 -0000   Daniel,   You will find a source here. It's probably the only one.     http://www.karg-elert-archive.org.uk/page4.html   Bruce Miles   website - http://www.gbmuk.fsnet.co.uk/index.html     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 2:47 PM Subject: Karg-Elert     "A Cycle of Eight Short Pieces," op. 154, concludes with a one-page "Corale" which goes from ff with 6-voice chords to ffff with 9 and 10 voices. The chord progressions could fairly be called 'dramatic.'       MAF     Yes--that is the piece I'm looking for...any idea on a publisher or where to get it? I've been unsuccessful looking at the websites of Kalmus, Schott, etc., but perhaps with the collection name and opus number I can have better luck.   Thanks--   Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri      
(back) Subject: orchestral voices in the organ From: "Randy Terry" <randy@peacham.homeip.net> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 11:09:31 -0800   ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Will Scarboro=20 To: PipeChat=20 Sent: Friday, February 25, 2005 7:24 AM Subject: Ernest M. Skinner   Dear list, =A0 =A0The rational behind E.M. Skinner's orchestral voices is quite simple. Skinner was a music lover. He enjoyed all kinds of music with a passion.=A0= At the end of the 19th century he looked at the organ and saw an instrument devoid of the color, timbre and musical expression that he heard in the orchestra and thought the organ should benefit from the addition of these voices.=20 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~= ~   Some of my favorite recordings are Trost organs. Trost was an early Baroqu= e organ builder and included such orchestral sounds as a Glockenspiel (not a cymbelstern but a full compass struck tuned bell instrument,) and that is used to marvelous effect in the easiest setting by Bach of "In dulci jubilo." =A0Another recording of the same organ in another Bach chorale setting uses the Viol da Gamba stop for a moving bass line and it sounds quite like some of our modern early music ensembles playing in the style of the day - just like someone sawing away on a baroque "cello" using no vibrato and gut strings.   I have a DVD of another famous Trost organ in a church/town hall and the organ is glorious. It is a large affair with stop knobs that pull out by the foot, but the sounds of many of the registers can be VERY orchestral. There are flutes that are not "harmonic," but come close to the sound of a transverse flute (as opposed to stopped Gedeckts which sound like baroque recorders.)   I think it is interesting to point out that during the ages what seems to make an acceptable instrument, whether they be from the Baroque or Romantic German eras, to the French and English Romantic schools, is that the full Principal chorus with mixtures is kept in some fashion. This may be the cas= e in only the largest instruments, but it still says something about what was considered complete when money and space were not objects to worry about.   In my DVD of a full Bach recital on that Trost in Altenburg (I think that i= s the city) The organ seems to have tierce mixtures and the organist uses the Sesquialtera registers in the plena of all big pieces. Where did we get th= e notion that these are unacceptable, anyway? Did Bach advocate removing the Seventeenth from mixtures??   +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ Randy Terry Music Minister The Episcopal Church of St. Peter Redwood City, California          
(back) Subject: Re: Catholic vs non-catholic Ave Marias?? From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2005 03:17:38 +0800   Adrianne,   Sorry for your family's loss...   My guess is that the funeral home liason was thinking of Charles Gounod's L= yrics to "Ave Maria" as being Catholic, and Johann Sebastian Bach's music = (Prelude #1 from the "Well Tempered Clavier") as being Protestant.   I cannot imagine that the Roman Catholic church would have a problem with F= ranz Schubert's either. Schubert's music is set to "Ave Maria" by Sir Walte= r Scott (English) translated by Adam Storck (German) -- most often, however= , the Latin text is forced to fit the music.   As for Protestant churches, I doubt there would be an objection to either p= iece of music. (It's the lyrics, veneration of Mary and request for _her_ t= o provide intercessory prayer that get in the way.) The preference would pr= obably be for the Bach though.   Hope this helps,   -- Jan   p.s. "Amazing Grace" can be a very touching piece if sung by a soloist unac= companied. -- Don't play "On Top of Old Smokey" for the in-laws unless you = have a really good jug band. :-)     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Catholic vs non-catholic Ave Marias?? Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 12:42:43 -0500   >=20 > Somehow I have the feeling that I've seen or heard this referred=20 > to sometime in the last few months, but I've searched all over and=20 > can't find it. Sorry if I'm asking something that's right in front=20 > of my nose. My grandfather-in-law died last Friday, and you know=20 > how dumb the resulting whirlwind can make a person. :/ >=20 > The funeral home's liason was absolutely amazing, a truly gentle=20 > man so suited for his job that I cannot say enough praise. During=20 > one of the wakes, we were discussing music, and he mentioned a=20 > conversation he'd had recently with the funeral director....quote:=20=20 > "He said there are 2 Ave Marias, one by Schubert and one by someone=20 > else, and the catholic church only allows one of them, but he=20 > didn't know which." >=20 > We were clueless...I've always avoided catholicism, and my=20 > catholic in-laws can barely tell Amazing Grace from On Top Of Old=20 > Smokey. >=20 > I'll be sending Aaron a Thank You card early next week, and it=20 > would be wonderful if I could do something nice for him by=20 > including a quick guide to which Ave Maria is which and why there's=20 > a difference. If anybody knows the answer, it's this group. I'd=20 > be really grateful if someone would clue me in. >=20 > Thanks, > Ad   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: Wanamaker Pipe Organ Hour info sought From: "mack02445" <mack02445@comcast.net> Date: Fri, 25 Feb 2005 14:20:40 -0500   Stan as far as I can remember it is on WRTI in Philadelphia on the first Sunday of the month at 5:00 PM.   Cheers, Mack   Stan Krider wrote:   >Greetings; > >For those of us with failing memories, could someone on the list refresh = us >as to the time, date, and source of the once a month Wanamaker Pipe Organ = Hour > program? > > > >  
(back) Subject: RE: Blended worship music From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2005 03:31:04 +0800   The way the service is broken up, music nearly always follows after a praye= r ... if people are there to worship, they shouldn't be running around (the= gymnasium) _during_ a prayer. 1. They're not paying attention, 2. they are= distracting people around them as they come out of their chair (invariably= the middle of seven seats across) 3. Stomping on the hollow stage to make = their way to the piano or a microphone.=20   Yeah, we can rehearse the "once-in-a-while choir" to sit together, line up = and walk gracefully toward the front -- together. After the choral anthem w= e don't want it to look like a break from a football huddle though. -- proc= ess all the way to the back of the sanctuary, then quietly take your seat w= ith your family. The pastor will wait...   As for the stink-pots and candles; Oh, man, that's just way to Catholic...   (Got a haircut yesterday, not quite bald yet.)   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Emmons, Paul" <PEMMONS@wcupa.edu>   > Jan Nijhuis writes: >=20 > > The idea is to minimize the number of people movements, so we keep the > vocalists/instrumentalists up front at the beginning of worship -- they > sing the first hymn, stand for the call to worship and lead the praise > choruses. Whoever will play the offertory is expected to remain up front > off stage, but at the ready until he/she needs to play. >=20 > Interesting, but what's wrong with people moving around in church? Make > a virtue of necessity. >=20 > Where I live, they can become PROCESSIONS. You know, "Onward Christian > soldiers... with the cross of Jesus going on before" (not to mention > maybe even tapers and incense). We love'em :-) >=20 > Quentin Crisp say: when you start going bald, shave your head!   -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm    
(back) Subject: Re: Blended Worship From: "Jan Nijhuis" <nijhuis@email.com> Date: Sat, 26 Feb 2005 03:53:27 +0800   Robert,   I like the way you blend your service. The hazard with many "contemporary" = churches is that the "blend" will skew to the simpler, modern hymns. (Slipp= ery slope argument?) Having many songbooks in the pews or on the chairs bec= omes a clutter nightmare and people will spend lots 'o time searching for t= he song. (two is probably the limit.) It'd be nice if there were more (new?= ) hymnals published with both traditional hymns and the better of the moder= n ones. Failing that we end up with the "Karaoke" screen or a gazillion bul= letin inserts -- rarely with music and again we go to what is easier to sin= g.   When you mix in your modern blended hymn, do you mention the scriptural tex= t? (e.g. "As the Deer" - Martin Nystrom - Psalm 42:1-2) I know we don't do = it for traditional hymns, but I've made a point of including the scriptural= reference on bulletin inserts for praise choruses. This serves two purpose= s; 1. It wards off the "Jesus is my boyfriend" songs, 2. It shows how small= the scriptural reference can be. There is a lot of "meat" in the other 9 v= erses of Ps. 42 that could be made into a beautiful, modern song. It's just= that people read 3-11 and get depressed. "My tears have fed me day and nig= ht" "Where is your God?" "I'm deeply depressed; therefore I call to you fro= m the land of Jordan."   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Robert Nickel" <rnickel@charter.net>   > At Sturgeon Bay Moravian Church (Sturgeon Bay, WI), we primarily use the > Moravian Book of Worship. Because we have a strong church camp tradition, > there is that body of hymnody that holds a special place in the hearts of > many young and old Moravians. I have found the book RENEW: Hymns and So= ngs > for Blended Worship to be a useful supplementary. I know that many > denominations have gone to a contemporary supplement, and this one has > served us well. I am fortunate to be the one to select the hymns, so I > control just how blended we get. I know that the true definition of > "blending" is much more complicated than my take on it. My idea of blend= ing > is to simply offer a variety of hymnody styles. For instance, this Sunday > we will sing one traditional hymn known to many denominations, one > traditional hymn from the Moravian heritage, and the contemporary hymn "As > the Deer." I feel comfortable leading the contemporary hymns on the organ > or piano, and I have found the congregation to welcome either instrument. > Perhaps this plan means that I am guilty of trying to please all of the > people all of the time, but it seems to work for us. >=20 > Bob Nickel >=20 > > Someone on the Ship of Fools had a good suggestion yesterday=20 > > (tried and true somewhere in Canada): "Blend" by starting the=20 > > worship with an informal sing-a-long, complete with guitars,=20 > > praise band, whatever floats their boat for ten or fifteen=20 > > minutes; then begin the liturgy and keep the proceedings strictly=20 > > traditional throughout the remainder of the service. Does anyone=20 > > here have experience with that approach? >=20 > -- -- Jan Nijhuis nijhuis@email.com   --=20 ___________________________________________________________ Sign-up for Ads Free at Mail.com http://promo.mail.com/adsfreejump.htm