PipeChat Digest #5184 - Sunday, February 27, 2005
 
Re: Desiree's love of organs
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Different strokes for different folks  Was: Wicks In Columbus
  by <Wuxuzusu@aol.com>
Re: Wicks in Columbus
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Re:  Desiree's love of organs
  by "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net>
Re: Wicks in Columbus
  by "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net>
Trackers in Liturgical churches
  by "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Tracker in Columbus
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Trackers in Liturgical churches
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
NO ARIAS FOR ORGAN???   Re: Desiree's love of organs
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
FW: Re: Trackers in Liturgical churches
  by "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de>
My faults...? Re: Wicks in Columbus
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
WWBD
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
RE: My faults...? Re: Wicks in Columbus
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Desiree's love of organs From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 07:10:39 -0600   Desiree' wrote:   "Don't call an organ piece an Aria...Arias are not written for = organs...and using that term might have people question my credibility."   Really? No Arias for organ? Me thinks Pachelbel just might disagree with =   that statement. He wrote ARIAs for organ, and I doubt anyone would = question his credibility.   Of to play the ARIA in D .....   Cheers,   Tim    
(back) Subject: Different strokes for different folks Was: Wicks In Columbus From: <Wuxuzusu@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 08:29:49 EST   IApPSywgT0shISEKIApBdCBsZWFzdCBjaGFuZ2UgdGhlIHN1YmplY3QgbGluZSBvbiB0aGlz IG5ldyB0aHJlYWQhISEKU3RhbiBLcmlkZXIKIApJbiBhIG1lc3NhZ2UgZGF0ZWQgMi8yNy8y MDA1IDE6MzU6MTQgQU0gRWFzdGVybiBTdGFuZGFyZCBUaW1lLCAgCmFjZnJlZWQwOTA0QGVh cnRobGluay5uZXR3cml0ZXM6CgoKCk9uIDIvMjYvMDUgNjo0OCBQTSwgIkRlc2lyZWUnIiA8 bmljZW11c2ljYUB5YWhvby5jb20+ICB3cm90ZToKCj4gSSBoYXZlIHRvIHNheSB0aGF0IFBh dWwgRnJpdHRzIG9yZ2FucyBhcmUgaW4gbm8gd2F5ICJzcXVlYWsgIGJveGVzIi4KCkkgc2hh cmUgeW91ciBvcGluaW9uLCB0aG91Z2ggaXQncyBub3QgYmFzZWQgb24gYSBMT1Qgb2YgIGV4 cGVyaWVuY2Ugd2l0aCB0aGVtClBhdWwgSElNU0VMRiB3YXMgYSDCs3NxdWVhayBib3jCsiB3 aGVuIEkgZmlyc3QgbWV0ICBoaW3igLlidXQsIHRoZW4sIGhlIHdhcwpwcm9iYWJseSBvbmx5 IDE4IG1vbnRocyBvbGQgYXQgdGhlIHRpbWUuICAgIChJIERJRCB3aGlzcGVyIGluIGhpcyBl YXIgaG93IHRvCmJ1aWxkIGEgZmluZSBwaXBlIG9yZ2FuLCBvZiBjb3Vyc2U7IGhlICBhcHBh cmVudGx5IHJlbWVtYmVyZWQgdGhhdCBhZHZpY2UuKQoKCgoKCg=3D=3D
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks in Columbus From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 07:30:09 -0600   Why Scott? Tracker action show all your faults? Not having a "swell = box" and having to actually REGISTER an organ to hard for ya? Give me a = break.   Tim ----- Original Message -----=20 From: ScottFop@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Saturday, February 26, 2005 6:02 PM Subject: Re: Wicks in Columbus     In a message dated 2/26/05 3:10:37 PM Central Standard Time, = michaelandmaggy@comcast.net writes:     Anyone who thinks they=E2=80=99re throwing out a perfectly fine = Skinner should take a look at the specification at: <snip>=20 That must be the only =E2=80=9CSkinner=E2=80=9D with a IV - = 2/3=E2=80=99 mixture on the =E2=80=9CGrande Orgue=E2=80=9D , a V - = 1=E2=80=99 mixture on the =E2=80=9CPositif Orgue=E2=80=9D, and a III = =E2=80=93 =C2=BC=E2=80=99 mixture on the =E2=80=9CRecit Orgue=E2=80=9D. While Fritts might not be my first choice for a liturgical church = (not sure why they didn=E2=80=99t ask me) it looks like they=E2=80=99re = getting a lot of real 32=E2=80=99 ,16=E2=80=99, and 8=E2=80=99 gravitas = and quite a bit of sheer musicality. I=E2=80=99d like to hear it. I = might even be impressed with the way it sounds.     OK, let me rephrase, and I thought we went through this about 10 years = ago-=20   I DONT LIKE TRACKERS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   There.   -Scott     Scott F. Foppiano=20 Organist and Director of Parish Music Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Memphis, TN=20 In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum.  
(back) Subject: Re: Desiree's love of organs From: "Octaaf" <octaaf@charter.net> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 07:33:26 -0600   Gees, get a room people.   ----- Original Message ----- From: <RMB10@aol.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Saturday, February 26, 2005 4:55 PM Subject: Desiree's love of organs     > Desiree' wrote: >>Now...as musch as I love all organs of worth, EP or >>Tracker, oe even a toaster, 2 manuals or 5, Yesterday, >>or YesterYear, I have to say that Paul Fritts organs >>are in no way "squeak boxes". Even people comment on >>the organ at PLU without even hearing it. It DOES have >>a very large Swell division, and can play all periods >>of repertoire beautifully. > > You have said before that you don't like trackers and that you prefer > electric action organs, and you have also voiced your love for Ruffatti > organs (not > that you've played one of their new ones) to several of us in personal > emails, > even dedicating a book of your hymn intros to my church (unbeknownst to = me > or > my church) because we are getting one. We on the list also know of your =   > love > for Rodgers organs, because you were waging a campaign to get your = priests > to > throw out a pipe organ at St. Turibius Church in Chicago to replace it > with a > Rodgers, AND not even have any of the existing pipes connected to it, = even > with the possibility of having new windchests built. > > What are the factors that determine if an organ has worth in your > eyes/ears? > It seems as if there is no rhyme or reason, except that if Diane Bish > played > it. There is more to an organ than just being able to play loud music, > fanfares on a chamade and toccatas. Large instruments are fun to play, > and I'm > blessed that I've been able to play one regularly before, and even more > blessed > that I've gotten to design one for my church, but I realize that these = are > not > the staples of the organ world. I've never read a post of yours making = a > positive comment about a 4 rank unit organ, an early organ-reform = movement > tracker, > or even a wonderful example of early American organ building. While I > wouldn't want to have to play one of these every week, there are some = gems > out there. > > I've played a fantastic Kney tracker here in South Carolina. In New > England > I've played some great Johnsons, Hutchings, and Hooks. There are > wonderful > Beckeraths, Flentrops, Noacks, and Fisks that are fun to play and make = you > really watch your technique. Of course, I do love Aeolian-Skinners, > Kimballs, > Murray Harrises, and organs of that genre, but I have an appreciation = for > organs > of other styles, because I am a complete organist and I understand > organbuilding, due to the fact that I am a musician and can make music = on > anything that I > have to sit down at. I wouldn't want to have to play a screechophone > every > week, or an organ without modern day conveniences, but I have learned = how > to > appeciate organs that are not normally my cup of tea and can't play my > normal > style of music. > > The Ruffatti at my church is going to incorporate the best styles of the > Romantic and Orchestral styles of organbuilding, taking inspiration from =   > American, > English, French and Italian schools of building. I have done lots of > research with organ builders, as well as playing organs of all styles > across this > country, to get ideas for what I wanted, finding what worked and what I > felt > didn't work. In our application, a tracker just wouldn't have worked, > because we > needed a moveable console, the pipes are divided on two sides of the > baptistry > (stacked over 5 levels) and also needed an antiphonal division, so > electric > action was the only possibility. > > I do find it interesting that Desiree' has already decided that she = wants > to > make a CD on our organ, when she hasn't played or heard a new Ruffatti, > nor > has she been in our new sanctuary (none of our church staff has either, > since > it's just a bunch of steel being erected right now), and we're not sure > when the > organ will even be finished (due to the the fact that it's going into a > brand > new building)--summer 2006 is the projected time for installation. > > Please explain why you love my church's organ when it's only in > construction > right now, why you love Rodgers to the point of throwing out a pipe = organ, > and > why you suddenly are so in favor of trackers when you have never liked > them > before. > > Monty Bennett > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Wicks in Columbus From: "Roy Kersey" <rkersey@tds.net> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 11:46:14 -0500   Dear Scott and All, I looked at the specs on the St. Joseph website of both the = Skinner/Wicks and the proposed Fritts. If I am counting right, there are = 9 eight foot flue manual stops (excluding celestes) on the Skinner/Wicks = and 10 on the Fritts. There are 17 eight foot manual flues and reeds = (again excluding celestes) on the Skinner/Wicks and 18 on the Fritts. So, = merely on the basis of a head count, the Fritts beats the Skinner/Wicks = for amount of foundation tone. So, I'm a bit confused. As a specification, the Skinner/Wicks looks like a very nice organ. = I'm not sure why the St. Joseph people want to change. However, as long = as the Wicks is not thrown in the street, I guess they do have a right to = get what they want and perhaps the Skinner/Wicks will make someone else = very happy. Judging by other remarks here, the Skinner/Wicks does have = some problems (mechanical troubles, too deep cases). As Joe Friday says [may we have] "just the facts, Ma'am, just the = facts." Best Regards, Roy Kersey Organ Enthusiast and Amateur Trumpeter    
(back) Subject: Trackers in Liturgical churches From: "Jarle Fagerheim" <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 17:54:08 +0100   From ScottFop@aol.com: > MY opinion is that I just DONT like trackers in Liturgical worship = spaces. > They don't have the expression a big EP with multiple swell boxes have = nor do > they generally offer the same colors. From =93What People Ask About The Church=94 by Dale A. Robbins: > "Most churches have some form of liturgy that guides the flow of > service, but a "liturgical church" conducts its services by a strict, > prescribed liturgy =97 a formal structure or order of worship, which has > been passed down from tradition.".   From Jarle:   According to Robbins' definition, most churches around here (Norwegian state Lutheran) are "liturgical churches". I assume a liturgical church must have a "liturgical worship space", so Scott ought to be terribly dissatified by the organ situation here!   Most churches have two manual tracker organs of 15-25 stops, often with an Obo or Krummhorn as the only swell reed, and generally two or three 8' stops on the Hovedverk (Great). Some of these organs are dreadful Rieger-Klosses and various early neo-baroque experiments, but most are very well-built, sometimes exceptionally fine, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, and German instruments, serving their "liturgical churches" flawlessly. Not /one/ EP action organ has been erected here since the early 70's, and few are left from the 1920-1970 period. The quality of those left is generally lower than that of the newer trackers, although there are a couple of gems to be found.   As for multiple swells, my 1/P reed organ has three; one for the bass, another for the treble, and a "pedal moderator" for the two pedal stops. There's also a hitch-down crescendo pedal ;)   So: 1. I love the fine modern trackers in this area, the wonderful 1959 EP organ of Varhaug church distasted by almost every other Norwegian organist (featured on Organs&OrganistsOnline), and my family's two reed organs. 2. I tremendously enjoyed Scott's performance at the Shea's Wurlitzer during the OHS Convention in Buffalo. and 3. I just returned home after participating at the "Get Ahead" day in Newcastle, playing three fantastic organs, all mostly by Harrison&Harrison, with EP action. For the concluding students' recital in Newcastle Cathedral, I played Jon Kristian Fjellestad's Toccata (soon to be published online), using most of the 97 stops, including the magnificent Tuba! That surely ranks among my top experiences as an organist, besides playing the Nidaros Cathedral Wagner and the St-Ignatius Mander :D   --Jarle http://jarle.moo.no  
(back) Subject: Re: Tracker in Columbus From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 13:18:33 EST   Roy, Scott et al:   I can see both sides of this issue. Electric actions of all types allow the organist more choices than unison couplers as registration aids in tone painting the organists like Scott like to do. Yes, I know there are exceptions even on the electric side where only unison couplers are provided. Trackers run the gambit from stiff to normal, normal being 4 oz. approximately to operate the keys. It all depends on the circumstances of the layout and the number of stops on the chests. Electric actions are more consistent and trackers more resistant as couplers are used. As we age this becomes more of an issue as to how long we will be able to continue playing without pain and injury.   Now having said that, I do like Paul Fritz work as well as Martin Pasi, and Bond. Their work is not screechy and they use mild unequal temperaments which add tonal dimensions to organ works from ancient to modern that are impossible with the status quo equal temperament. To tell the honest truth at Seattle 2000 I was actually ready to throw rocks at trackers. Boy was I in for a sonic surprise and my favorite was the St. Boneface organ by Paul and also the big organ at PLU. I also decided that I didn't like dead rooms especially University = Presby- terian which was carpeted wall to wall including the walls. The ceilings were also heavily treated. No grandeur to the music there.   There are no guarantees that tracker actions will be superior to any of the modern electric ones. The Holy Cross Flentrop is a bad example there in Chicago. There is good and bad in a lot of different projects. St. Mary's Cathedral in SF is not a stellar example of the electric. Ted Worth scaled it all wrong, and choruses are out of balance. The pedal Principal 16' actually voiced out as a 16' Dulciana requiring an electronic voice to pick up the slack. The 32' Bombard swallows up the whole organ. There are expensive mistakes on both sides of the issue. I'm just balancing out the perspectives. I hope you see that.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Trackers in Liturgical churches From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 19:32:53 +0100   I fully second Jarle in this regard. In another week we will experience a wonderful liturgical space of =C9glise Saint-Etienne in Marmoutier/Alsace. The organ: the 1710-Andreas-Silbermann. If I recall correctly, it's a tracker :-) The recent discussion of the Gabler organ in Weingarten left one point open. The organ is in wonderful harmony with a great liturgical space. But I don't think there was any misunderstanding that Gabler built trackers. What about all the Cliquots in France. Aren't they trackers? And aren't the locations great liturgical places.? Yes, old ancient times. OK, let's go to NYC. Isn't the Mander a tracker? And, isn't St. Igantius Loyala one of the most beautiful liturgical places in NYC, architecturally and musically? Is Kent Tritle handicapped in any way to contribut to an exciting liturgical experience by the fact, that his organ is a tracker? Hundreds, probably thousands of wonderful sacred spaces in Germany and Europe would fall under the "non liturgical" classification, if it would be true that a tracker organ and a liturgical space would be mutually exclusive.   Lot's to think about.   Hans-Friedrich Hell   -----Original Message----- Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 17:54:08 +0100 Subject: Trackers in Liturgical churches From: Jarle Fagerheim <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>   From ScottFop@aol.com: > MY opinion is that I just DONT like trackers in Liturgical worship spaces. > They don't have the expression a big EP with multiple swell boxes have nor do > they generally offer the same colors. From =93What People Ask About The Church=94 by Dale A. Robbins: > "Most churches have some form of liturgy that guides the flow of > service, but a "liturgical church" conducts its services by a strict, > prescribed liturgy =97 a formal structure or order of worship, which has > been passed down from tradition.".   From Jarle:   According to Robbins' definition, most churches around here (Norwegian state Lutheran) are "liturgical churches". I assume a liturgical church must have a "liturgical worship space", so Scott ought to be terribly dissatified by the organ situation here!   Most churches have two manual tracker organs of 15-25 stops, often with an Obo or Krummhorn as the only swell reed, and generally two or three 8' stops on the Hovedverk (Great). Some of these organs are dreadful Rieger-Klosses and various early neo-baroque experiments, but most are very well-built, sometimes exceptionally fine, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, and German instruments, serving their "liturgical churches" flawlessly. Not /one/ EP action organ has been erected here since the early 70's, and few are left from the 1920-1970 period. The quality of those left is generally lower than that of the newer trackers, although there are a couple of gems to be found.   As for multiple swells, my 1/P reed organ has three; one for the bass, another for the treble, and a "pedal moderator" for the two pedal stops. There's also a hitch-down crescendo pedal ;)   So: 1. I love the fine modern trackers in this area, the wonderful 1959 EP organ of Varhaug church distasted by almost every other Norwegian organist (featured on Organs&OrganistsOnline), and my family's two reed organs. 2. I tremendously enjoyed Scott's performance at the Shea's Wurlitzer during the OHS Convention in Buffalo. and 3. I just returned home after participating at the "Get Ahead" day in Newcastle, playing three fantastic organs, all mostly by Harrison&Harrison, with EP action. For the concluding students' recital in Newcastle Cathedral, I played Jon Kristian Fjellestad's Toccata (soon to be published online), using most of the 97 stops, including the magnificent Tuba! That surely ranks among my top experiences as an organist, besides playing the Nidaros Cathedral Wagner and the St-Ignatius Mander :D   --Jarle http://jarle.moo.no   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: NO ARIAS FOR ORGAN??? Re: Desiree's love of organs From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 13:40:58 EST   In a message dated 2/27/05 7:11:25 AM Central Standard Time, octaaf@charter.net writes:   > Desiree' wrote:"Don't call an organ piece an Aria...Arias are not = written > for organs...and using that term might have people question my = credibility." > > Really? No Arias for organ? Me thinks Pachelbel just might disagree = with > that statement. He wrote ARIAs for organ, and I doubt anyone would = question > > his credibility. > > Of to play the ARIA in D .....     What about the Flor Peeters ARIA? I recorded it on one of my CDs...I = assure you it exists, and IS called "Aria" as originally titled by the composer.   Scott F. Foppiano Organist and Director of Parish Music Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Memphis, TN In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum.  
(back) Subject: FW: Re: Trackers in Liturgical churches From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 19:41:04 +0100   Sorry for that stupid typo. LOTS to think about, of course Hans     -----Original Message----- Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 19:32:53 +0100 Subject: Re: Trackers in Liturgical churches From: "Hell-Concerts@t-online.de" <Hell-Concerts@t-online.de> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>   I fully second Jarle in this regard. In another week we will experience a wonderful liturgical space of =C9glise Saint-Etienne in Marmoutier/Alsace. The organ: the 1710-Andreas-Silbermann. If I recall correctly, it's a tracker :-) The recent discussion of the Gabler organ in Weingarten left one point open. The organ is in wonderful harmony with a great liturgical space. But I don't think there was any misunderstanding that Gabler built trackers. What about all the Cliquots in France. Aren't they trackers? And aren't the locations great liturgical places.? Yes, old ancient times. OK, let's go to NYC. Isn't the Mander a tracker? And, isn't St. Igantius Loyala one of the most beautiful liturgical places in NYC, architecturally and musically? Is Kent Tritle handicapped in any way to contribut to an exciting liturgical experience by the fact, that his organ is a tracker? Hundreds, probably thousands of wonderful sacred spaces in Germany and Europe would fall under the "non liturgical" classification, if it would be true that a tracker organ and a liturgical space would be mutually exclusive.   Lot's to think about.   Hans-Friedrich Hell   -----Original Message----- Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 17:54:08 +0100 Subject: Trackers in Liturgical churches From: Jarle Fagerheim <jarle_fagerheim@yahoo.co.uk> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org>   From ScottFop@aol.com: > MY opinion is that I just DONT like trackers in Liturgical worship spaces. > They don't have the expression a big EP with multiple swell boxes have nor do > they generally offer the same colors. From =93What People Ask About The Church=94 by Dale A. Robbins: > "Most churches have some form of liturgy that guides the flow of > service, but a "liturgical church" conducts its services by a strict, > prescribed liturgy =97 a formal structure or order of worship, which has > been passed down from tradition.".   From Jarle:   According to Robbins' definition, most churches around here (Norwegian state Lutheran) are "liturgical churches". I assume a liturgical church must have a "liturgical worship space", so Scott ought to be terribly dissatified by the organ situation here!   Most churches have two manual tracker organs of 15-25 stops, often with an Obo or Krummhorn as the only swell reed, and generally two or three 8' stops on the Hovedverk (Great). Some of these organs are dreadful Rieger-Klosses and various early neo-baroque experiments, but most are very well-built, sometimes exceptionally fine, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, and German instruments, serving their "liturgical churches" flawlessly. Not /one/ EP action organ has been erected here since the early 70's, and few are left from the 1920-1970 period. The quality of those left is generally lower than that of the newer trackers, although there are a couple of gems to be found.   As for multiple swells, my 1/P reed organ has three; one for the bass, another for the treble, and a "pedal moderator" for the two pedal stops. There's also a hitch-down crescendo pedal ;)   So: 1. I love the fine modern trackers in this area, the wonderful 1959 EP organ of Varhaug church distasted by almost every other Norwegian organist (featured on Organs&OrganistsOnline), and my family's two reed organs. 2. I tremendously enjoyed Scott's performance at the Shea's Wurlitzer during the OHS Convention in Buffalo. and 3. I just returned home after participating at the "Get Ahead" day in Newcastle, playing three fantastic organs, all mostly by Harrison&Harrison, with EP action. For the concluding students' recital in Newcastle Cathedral, I played Jon Kristian Fjellestad's Toccata (soon to be published online), using most of the 97 stops, including the magnificent Tuba! That surely ranks among my top experiences as an organist, besides playing the Nidaros Cathedral Wagner and the St-Ignatius Mander :D   --Jarle http://jarle.moo.no   ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>         ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>        
(back) Subject: My faults...? Re: Wicks in Columbus From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 13:44:48 EST   In a message dated 2/27/05 7:31:14 AM Central Standard Time, octaaf@charter.net writes:   > Why Scott? Tracker action show all your faults? Not having a "swell = box" > and having to actually REGISTER an organ to hard for ya? Give me a = break.     1) Not at all. I can certainly play a tracker along with anyone else. = But I practically had them shoved down my throat in college. Let's just say = OVER exposure...and, no- I do not care for an overabundance of articulation and =   clicking and chiffing. It's annoying.   2) not having at least one expressive division on ANY instrument of = moderate size up is inexcusable. It also shows blatant bad design on the part of = the builder and locks the player into complete inflexibility of registration = and musical expression.   3) People have commented in my theatre organ concerts and classical = recitals how much hand registration I do, even with the pistons.   Next?   Scott F. Foppiano Organist and Director of Parish Music Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Memphis, TN In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum.  
(back) Subject: WWBD From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 27 Feb 2005 13:51:08 EST   What would Bach do? Alright, now- this should be fun:   If JS Bach were here and could play BOTH organs side by side, would he = prefer the sounds and operation Woolsey Hall or the Bush-Reisinger Museum?   Think really hard before answering. AND, also, before you answer, WHY = aren't you writing this by hand on papyrus with a feather quill and an ink well = and hand-addressing it in a self-licked stamped envelope to be sent to = everyone on the list instead of on your COMPUTER?   Scott F. Foppiano Organist and Director of Parish Music Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Memphis, TN In te Domine speravi, non confundar in aeternum.  
(back) Subject: RE: My faults...? Re: Wicks in Columbus From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Mon, 28 Feb 2005 08:20:40 +1300     >But I practically had them shoved down my throat in college.=A0=20   What an extraordinarily lucky man you were. Seriously, you were. Some of = us never had the chance to do any work at a music college of any kind, and there wasn't an organ of any description (not even a harmonium) at the university we attended.=20   What you consider a bad experience, I would consider quite incredibly = good fortune.   And no, this is nothing more than a gentle reminder at how many = blessings we need to count, and to count them one by one.   Ross