PipeChat Digest #5054 - Tuesday, January 4, 2005
 
durufle's epiphany prelude
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Question(s)
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: Question(s)
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
Follow-up to my "Question(s)" post
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: Question(s)
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: Question(s)
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: Question(s)
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Question(s)
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Forgotten and/or lesser-played treasures WAS Questions (2 part discus)
  by "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com>
Scholarship Question on Ornaments
  by "mpm1927op4933" <mpm1927op4933@yahoo.com>
 

(back) Subject: durufle's epiphany prelude From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 10:54:04 EST   does anybody know what the chant is durufle used in his prelude for the introit to the epiphany?  
(back) Subject: Question(s) From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2005 09:40:01 -0800   Hello fellow organophiles....   I assessing my plans for the new year, I've been doing a lot of = thinking...   I spend quite a bit of my spare time researching unfamiliar music, = recording it, and sharing the results on these forums. In checking my server logs, I find that often several HUNDRED of you will download stuff when I post it...   That is very gratifying to note....   What I am wondering, though, is if you all actually find these pieces interesting...   Have you been stimulated to: - explore an unfamiliar composer - buy some music, etc. as a result?   I'll continue to research and record for my own enjoyment and enlightenment in any case, but it would be nice to hear some further comments. (BTW, I don't do this just to get comments or recognition, I do it to help you all hear some music you've likely never heard, seen, nor can you find a recording of it anywhere else.)   What say ye?   Cheers from a cold and rainy California   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Question(s) From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 20:17:47 +0100   Dear Jonathan, your request reminds me that I am often wondering when I browse through = catalogues of sheet music, why nobody made recordings of this available stuff. The more or less complete organ works of i. e. Lefebure-Wely, boely, = Lasceux, etc. etc. are available but if you browse through the CD catalogues you'll find barely an antology of 2, 3 CDs. But again and = again Bach complete organ works, Reger, Vierne, Rheinberger, Dupre and the countless organ works you get on a single CD like = Mendelssohn, Durufle, Schumann, Brahms etc. In the sheet music catalogues you'll also find a lot of interesting = programed selections i. e. pieces only for the pedals. So I encurrage you to keep on recording such music. I enjoy it.   Greetings   Arno    
(back) Subject: Follow-up to my "Question(s)" post From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2005 12:20:06 -0800   I've gotten several nice comments, but a couple of you have made very good suggestions....   Not everyone has a high-speed connection, so 2 things would be helpful:   - give the size of the file - offer a smaller (obviously lower-quality) file   so, in the spirit of that, I've done a test run for you dial-up folks... give it a try, and if it seems lots better for you, I'll change my website to also offer the LQ links:   From the most recent offering (Jacquemin) http://evensongmusic.net/audio/LQ/Jacquemin_Symphonie_mvt_1LQ.mp3 = (1.19mb)   My recent Toccata on Good King Wenceslas: http://evensongmusic.net/audio/LQ/WenceslasLQ.mp3 (634kb)   Steve Bests's 3 Festive Pieces: http://evensongmusic.net/audio/LQ/CelefanLQ.mp3 (494kb) http://evensongmusic.net/audio/LQ/grandLQ.mp3 (582kb) http://evensongmusic.net/audio/LQ/WestminsterLQ.mp3 (917kb)   Let me know if this is helpful!   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Question(s) From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 15:50:32 EST   Jonathan,   comment   comments     more comments   of course we are all freeloaders and MUCH PREFER you do the work and we = get the glory.......   :-)     back up to average of 50 on Sundays, sounding better and wanting to do = "good" stuff, not Courtney and medema...... hmmmmmmm   they know that Clydesdale is coming....... double <G>   Happy New Year   dale in florida   BTW, GKW, ever write anything in a "straight" time?   LOLLOLLOL   trios do NOT count  
(back) Subject: Re: Question(s) From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Mon, 03 Jan 2005 13:45:19 -0800   Keys4bach@aol.com wrote:   > Jonathan, > > comment > > comments > > > more comments > > of course we are all freeloaders and MUCH PREFER you do the work and > we get the glory....... > > :-) > Yeah, but do you LIKE the stuff? Is it HELPFUL? <grin>   > > back up to average of 50 on Sundays, sounding better and wanting to do > "good" stuff, not Courtney and medema...... hmmmmmmm > > they know that Clydesdale is coming....... double <G> > Heh.... I've got a big splashy Psalm setting you might like.... kinda sounds lik Cecil B. Demille meets King David <chuckle> You can have a PDF of it if you promise to make a reasonably decent recording of it with your choir <chuckle>   > Happy New Year > > dale in florida > > BTW, GKW, ever write anything in a "straight" time? > Oh yeah..... did I ever give you the Hymn arrangements volume I did? There arre several things therein that are "straight"   > LOLLOLLOL > > trios do NOT count   Pshaw. Do too! <g>   -J   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Question(s) From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 17:51:34 EST   Jon:   Keep up the good work! Your recordings bring new ideas for music, and the selections are up beat, very playable, and enjoyable to listen to. There are simply more "Gordon Young" type composers out there that write exceedingly well for the greatest number of organists out there. These are the guys who will make a living selling their wares. Gordon did very well. Those who write for that small inner circle die in poverty because so few can play these works or even finding people willing to listen to them. Even Bach was smart enough to do that. Arioso, Jesu Joy, The G string have probably sold more copies in actual money than his more difficult works.   Yes, keep them coming, we'll listen and buy too   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Re: Question(s) From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 18:20:12 EST   In a message dated 1/3/2005 5:52:12 PM Eastern Standard Time, RonSeverin@aol.com writes:   > The G string   my favorite for Anti-Porn Sundays......   or if this were another list................     dale hoping to start something it has been dead for 2 days  
(back) Subject: Forgotten and/or lesser-played treasures WAS Questions (2 part discus) From: "T.Desiree' Hines" <nicemusica@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 21:04:33 -0800 (PST)   Arno mentioned the lack of recordings of organ music by composers that = were fresh in their time, and still are nice to hear today, such as = Lefebure-Wely and Boely. This opens the path to a nice conversation on pieces of organ music that = we don't seem to hear very much, if at all. One thinks about what Nancy = Grannert called her CD... and says they pave "Roads Less Travelled". Of = course, as most organists do, I enjoy learning those pieces that are = pretty standard in the course of study. But, nothing is more interesting = to me than those pieces in the repertoire that are unfamiliar to the = younger generation, and sometimes, disregarded as musical by yesteryears = organists. One example is the piece that I am learning with my teacher, = the Marche Nuptial by Alphonse Catherine. It's a French march, relatively = short in nature but filled with very beautiful harmonies.We hope to couple = it with the Marche from the Widor 4th. I had never heard of it until I = spotted the book it is in. My teacher even mentioned that other than the = Marche upon Lift Up.... by Guilmant, that the bigger French Marches that = are not programmed as often as he would like to see. He mentioned the other two larger Widor Marches (Syms One and 3), as well a = a few others. (an interesting sidenote on the beautiful Marche = Pontificale.. I THINK that Yamen or UAE, or another Meditaranian country = has it as their national music) Other examples: Some of the lesser played independant Preludes and Fugues = of Bach that fall in with the Legrenzi and Correlli influenced fugues. = Does anyone ever see them programmed before there is an "I Learned All = Bach's Organ Music" Fest? Felix Hell is playing the robust and beautiful = Prelude in G Major frequently with very good reviews. Then, there's the = OTHER Bach Fantasy in G Major that would make a nice little opener to a = section where one would make the keys flow from IV to I or V to I. Its = almost Buxtehudian in nature, and would be a nice piece before some = lyrical chorales and the Buxtehude D Major. To bring it all together, Arno's post prompted a thought...Why are certain = pieces not heard very much? Who is going to do the other recordings of = beautiful organ rep. by composers that is lesser known or played? Examples = of recordings that are out there: Calvert Johnsons recording Flo. Price's = music and Nancy Grannert's recording. I assume that Jonathan O is doing some recording of this nature as well. = Business has kept me unattentive the past several posts.If thats correct, = kudos to him. It's nice to renew interests in things forgotten. For us = younger organists, we need to try to preserve and learn some of that = music. It should not be beneath us to do that. --------------------------------- ANOTHER question that is somewhat related to the topic at hand: Who plays = and enjoys the Reger 30 Short Chorales? WONDERFUL music! A Reger = Specialist even did a workshop at AGO LA on them calling them a "Romantic = Orgelbuchlein" Did anyone attend that? SLEEP TIME! And Happy Belated NY to all listers. I think we all deserve a = month of vacation!! TDH   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com
(back) Subject: Scholarship Question on Ornaments From: "mpm1927op4933" <mpm1927op4933@yahoo.com> Date: Mon, 3 Jan 2005 21:57:19 -0800 (PST)   As a beginning organist, one of the things that I find confusing is the discrepancies in ornaments in various organ books. A fair amount of books I've found contain the table of ornaments that Bach did for his son Wilhelm Friedemann. The Stainer/Kraft/Thedore Presser edition contains it on p. 99, for instance. My research indicates that it was done for Wilhelm Friedemann (1710-1784) when he was age 9, so that would be around 1719. Then there's the ornaments that were passed down through the Dupre method and can be found on p. 69 with a whole series of performance rules found on the pages surrounding. When you compare them, there are some differences. What Dupre calls "Le Mordant" does not exist in Bach's table, as one example. It's hard to argue with Bach's own handwriting, but it seems to me that Dupre's table and rules are more persuasive. Considering that Bach's table was done in 1719 and that there were 31 years left in his life, what's the possibility that he changed his thinking somewhat about ornaments over the last 3 decades of his life and that what Dupre has passed down could potentially be more consistent with what Bach's views on ornaments may have been at the end of his life? If any of you have wrestled with these consistency issues, I would appreciate hearing any feedback.   Thank you, Scott           __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250