PipeChat Digest #5055 - Tuesday, January 4, 2005
 
Re: Forgotten and/or lesser-played treasures WAS Questions (2 part discus
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
Re: Scholarship Question on Ornaments
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Forgotten Treasures?
  by <RMB10@aol.com>
Re: Forgotten Treasures?
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Forgotten Treasures?
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Scholarship Question on Ornaments (LONG)
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: durufle's epiphany prelude
  by <Matthew_Siess@groove.net>
Hymns for January
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Re: Hymns for January
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Looking for Richard Purvis "Four Prayers in Tone"
  by "T B" <maestrotim@hotmail.com>
Re: durufle's epiphany prelude
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
Re: Hymns for January
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
RE: Hymns for January
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
RE: Hymns for January
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Re: Hymns for January
  by <Gfc234@aol.com>
Re: Hymns for January
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
RE: Hymns for January
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: Hymns for January
  by "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net>
Re: Scholarship Question on Ornaments
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: durufle's epiphany prelude
  by "Malcolm Wechsler \(Mander Organs\)" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
Re: Hymns for January
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Re: Forgotten Treasures?
  by "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu>
Re: Scholarship Question on Ornaments
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Forgotten and/or lesser-played treasures WAS Questions (2 part discus) From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 11:29:10 +0100   Hi, your mail reminds me to another example I forgot to mention in my previous = mail. Some years ago I bought some volumes of Barbara Owen's Anthology of = American Organ Music. I am not an organist so I just typed in the pieces in a sequenzer to = listen to this really nice little pieces. I know selections of this historic American music was available on LP, = single pieces are available on CD, but I'll never understand why nobody will record the complete volumes on CD. It's available as sheet = music. So somebody thinks, the music is worth to play (I do!), but it seems there are nobody who thinks it's worth to tape it. = That's really strange to me.   Greetings   Arno    
(back) Subject: Re: Scholarship Question on Ornaments From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 06:28:29 EST   Dear Scott- There are two books you must get-they are both available through = Amazon.com 1. Organ Tecnhnique Modern and Early by George Ritchie and George = Stauffer 2. L'Art de Toucher le Clavecin by Francois Couperin   DO NOT follow Marcel Dupre's fingerings, pedalings, or ornamentation in Bach-they are not correct and were not practiced by Bach or any of his = students. (ok-shoot me now) However-the Dupre book is superb for getting your chops together-   Get a teacher from a university, and some recordings of Bach-I find the = most refined, gracious, and historically informed playing to be done by Hans Fagius-my next favorite is Marie Claire Alain. They have both recorded = the complete works-on fine organs-if you search on EBAY-chances are that you = will run across one of these box sets-and that you will win it for less than half = of what you would pay at a retail store .   What town are you located in? Perhaps there is a qualified listmember = near you that would be happy to get you pointed in the right direction. If = you happen to live in Chicago, the invitation stands.   Cheers and Happy New Year! gfc           Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Forgotten Treasures? From: <RMB10@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 07:12:26 EST   The are lots of recordings out there of the "trashy" gems, however a recording packed solidly full of Lefebure-Wely, Boely, and the like is = akin to going to a confectioner and gorging ones self. I for one, do love some of that music, BUT, a little goes a loooooong way. There is a recording by David = Britton, at Trinity Cathedral, Portland, OR, entitled "Gargoyles and Chimeras" that = has a Saint-Saens prelude and Fugue, a Bach work, as well as the Sowerby = Carillon and the Lefebure-Wely Bolero de Concert.   I also have a CD, that I'm looking for as I type this, recorded at Huddersfield Town Hall (I think). It features all Victorian organ music, = and has works such as Will o' the Wisp, Cloister Garth, there's also a tuba tune on = there, if I remember. It is really saccharine--good in small doses. The playing = is superb and the organ is wonderful, but a little of that music not balanced = out with some other works is just a little too stilted for me. I don't think = that it has to be balanced out with Froberger or Scheidt, or even Bach, but = just balance it out with some of the "beef" of that era. I haven't listened to = that CD in a long time, so I don't remember all that is on there, so there may = be a large work on there that I am forgetting.   The fact that I always found interesting about Lefebure-Wely is that he sought to reform organ music and church music in France from the abyss = that it was in. However, if we look at some of his compositions as a step towards progress, the works being played must have really been pretty horrid. = I've read accounts of organists playing all sorts of ditties, much to the horror of = the priests, and to the delight of the congregants. I can only imagine what = some of the "purist" musicians would think of the music back in the early part of = the 19th century...the would have had apoplexy! HA!     Monty Bennett  
(back) Subject: Re: Forgotten Treasures? From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 07:38:05 EST     In a message dated 1/4/05 6:14:17 AM, RMB10@aol.com writes:     > so there may be > a large work on there that I am forgetting. >   Probably the Vierne Gargoyles and Chimeras from the Pieces de Fantaisie- gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Forgotten Treasures? From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 07:42:06 EST     In a message dated 1/4/05 6:14:17 AM, RMB10@aol.com writes:     > The fact that I always found interesting about Lefebure-Wely is that he > sought to reform organ music and church music in France from the abyss tha= t=20 > it was > in.=C2=A0 However, if we look at some of his compositions as a step toward= s > progress, the works being played must have really been pretty horrid.=C2= =A0 I've=20 > read > accounts of organists playing all sorts of ditties, much to the horror of=20 > the > priests, and to the delight of the congregants. I can only imagine what so= me=20 > of > the "purist" musicians would think of the music back in the early part of=20 > the > 19th century...the would have had apoplexy! HA! >=20 >=20 >=20   Here is a snip from an old paper that I wrote:   Towards the end of the French Classic period there was a widespread attempt=20 to please the public. French organist-composers used both religious and secu= lar=20 carols as themes for variations. Tunes were simple; each couplet had a=20 different rhythmic treatment, usually progressing from slow to fast. The h= armony=20 was often limited to tonic-dominant motion, and there was usually no=20 modulation. Dandrieu, Daquin, and Corrette were the most celebrated =E2= =80=9CNoelistes=E2=80=9D. The beginning of the 18th century through the 19th century was a secular age= =20 in France. During this period, there was great interest in philosophy and= =20 the rise of the common man, and a drastic decline in the quality of organ=20 music. The goal of the music was to entertain rather than spiritually insp= ire,=20 and was greatly influenced by Italian song, theater, and ballet and was secu= lar.=20 Dances, songs, marches, imitations, patriotic tunes, battle pieces, storm=20 pieces, improvisations on the Te Deum and Judix Crederis were common. =20 According to Correte, one could create storm sounds by placing a board over=20= the=20 bottom octave of the pedal clavier, drawing the trumpet and bombarde stops,=20= and=20 stomping at will. To imitate a clap up thunder, one could strike the lowes= t=20 keys with their elbow. This lower quality of music was prominent until the= =20 middle of the 19th century. Alexandre-Pierre-Francois Boely (1785-1858) was organist of St.=20 Germain-l'Auxerrois, and the first to make an attempt to restore the quality= of French=20 organ music. He was one of the first in France to promote the music of Bac= h, and=20 was also a disciple of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. While at St. Germain,=20 he had the organ fit with a German pedal board, which allowed the performanc= e=20 of Bach and other music with highly active and contrapuntal pedal lines. T= his=20 was a first in France. =20 Boely's efforts were unappreciated by his congregation, and he was ultimatel= y=20 fired for not satisfying their thirst for secular music. Nevertheless,=20 seven collections of Boely's works were published during his lifetime,   gfc   Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Scholarship Question on Ornaments (LONG) From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 05:29:04 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Like many organists, I wish I could give the definitive answer about the playing of Bach's ornamentation, but I cannot. The trouble is, this is not the answer here required; especially if an "academic" approach has to be demonstrated and exam marks depend upon the results.   The problems of interpreting Bach's ornaments manifest themselves on several fronts.   1) Which manuscripts are autographed, and which are second or third hand?   2) If they are copies, or worse still, copies of copies, how can we be sure that ALL the ornaments are copied correctly?   3) Bach often worked by candlelight, and his eyesight began to seriously fail in his later years. Were his directions at this time correctly written?   4) Performing editions are themselves works of improvisation and interpretation.   5) Ornamentation changed from region to region, and even German composers would often write in "Italian" or "French" style.....Bach especially.   6) Is a work "early" or "late".....North German inspired, or French inspired....but then, didn't the Italian musicians visit Kiel during Buxtehude's time, and wow audiences with their spontaneity and inventive ornamentation?   I have come across a fine URL with many musical examples, which I would commend:-   http://members.aol.com/kjvisbest/jsb_ornm.htm   Like Greg, I would dismiss Dupre's accuracy, and probably that of the Schweitzer-Widor editions also.   Regarding C P E Bach's indications, it should be pointed out that this has been the subject of intense controversy and extended discussion over many years.   How about the following from C P E Bach? While a student in L=FCneburg, my father had the opportunity to listen to a band kept by the Duke of Celle, consisting for the most part of Frenchmen; thus he acquired a thorough grounding in the French taste, which in those regions was something quite new....   Or perhaps the following:-   Christian Thomasius in his Von Nachahmung der Franz=F6sen of 1687, wrote:- French clothes, French food, French furniture, French customs, French sins, French illnesses are generally in vogue......   -o-o-o-o-o   Personally, I have always had great difficulty with "O mensch bewein", and for years I struggled to find the definitive ornamentation, but finally stopped worrying about it. Instead, I played what "felt right" and the music improved as a result.   Also, there was a baroque tradition of "on the fly" ornamentation.......something spontaneous.....that is the difference between pedantry and music.   But it IS important to know the differences between, say, the Italian composers and a French composer such as Couperin, who required the exact detail of his "table de agreements" to be followed very precisely:-   "I am always astonished, after the pains I have taken to indicate the appropriate ornaments for my pieces, to hear people who have learnt them without heeding my instructions. Such negligence is unpardonable...."   -o-o-o-o-   In addition to the writings Greg recommends, I would add the following:-   Robert Donington's Baroque Music: Style and Performance   Frederick Neumann's Ornamentation in "Baroque and Post-Baroque Music"   -o-o-o-o-o   It is also important to know that Bach was at least as familiar with Italian practice as he was French, and to this end, there must always be the opportunity for improvised ornamentation; even if this seems to re-write the music. Take those majestic "silences" in the C major Prelude & Fugue. Do they work in a small church with a modest acoustic? Almost certainly not!   Fill in with fantastic ornamentation, and this work can just "lift off" into orbit......the Ton Koopman approach to Bach....structured, formal but free as a bird to make REAL music......just so long as you KNOW THE RULES before breaking them, wearing a creative grin.   I'll finish with a wonderful quote from Duke Ellington:-   "If you're going to play good jazz you've got to have a plan of what's going to happen. There has to be intent. It's like an act of murder: you play with an intent to commit something".   Enjoy your studies. You will emerge confused, but a far better musician for it!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- Gfc234@aol.com wrote:   > Dear Scott- > There are two books you must get-they are both > available through Amazon.com > 1. Organ Tecnhnique Modern and Early by George > Ritchie and George Stauffer > 2. L'Art de Toucher le Clavecin by Francois > Couperin       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Re: durufle's epiphany prelude From: <Matthew_Siess@groove.net> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 10:05:37 -0500     According to the liner notes from Todd Wilson's recording of the Durufl= =E9 organ works, the "Pr=E9lude sur l'Intro=EFt de l'=C9piphanie" is based = on the plainchant "Ecce advenit dominator Dominus".   >> does anybody know what the chant is durufle used in his prelude for = the introit to the epiphany? =      
(back) Subject: Hymns for January From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 15:31:22 -0000   I'm next playing at the vigil mass at my church on Saturday. Although the Epiphany will already have been, does anyone think that it would be inappropriate for me to play Christmas Carols, such as 'We Three Kings' = and 'See Amid the Winter's Snow'? I am just asking because I am having a disagreement about this with the Priest.   Thanks,   DS    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns for January From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 10:46:49 EST     In a message dated 1/4/05 9:32:11 AM, dominicscullion@email.com writes:     >=20 > I=E2=80=99m next playing at the vigil mass at my church on Saturday. Altho= ugh the=20 > Epiphany will already have been, does anyone think that it would be=20 > inappropriate for me to play Christmas Carols, such as =E2=80=98We Three K= ings=E2=80=99 and =E2=80=98See Amid=20 > the Winter=E2=80=99s Snow=E2=80=99? I am just asking because I am having a= disagreement about=20 > this with the Priest. > Thanks, > DS >=20 a word to the wise- if you value your job-i strongly suggest that you agree with the=20 preist-unless you are on very friendly and collegial terms with him- my two cents-       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Looking for Richard Purvis "Four Prayers in Tone" From: "T B" <maestrotim@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 15:53:12 +0000   Last week, I was fortunate to hear a New Year's Eve organ recital at the Christian Scientist Mother Church Aeolian-Skinner organ, here in Boston. What moved me most was the organists rendering of "Supplication," from Richard Purvis' "Four Prayers In Tone." I understand this is long out of print and have discovered it was published by Witmark in 1951. Does = anyone know who holds the copyright to Witmark's publications and if they may photocopy out of print titles for a nominal fee. Of course, if anyone has =   this in their collection and would like to sell, I would be happy to get = it off your hands. Thanks! Tim      
(back) Subject: Re: durufle's epiphany prelude From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 11:01:08 EST   In a message dated 1/4/05 7:06:15 AM Pacific Standard Time,=20 Matthew_Siess@groove.net writes:   > According to the liner notes from Todd Wilson's recording of the Durufl= =E9 > organ works, the "Pr=E9lude sur l'Intro=EFt de l'=C9piphanie" is based on=20= the > plainchant "Ecce advenit dominator Dominus".   thanks! i had that cd, but it was one of the ones i lost in my last move.  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns for January From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 11:03:28 EST   In a message dated 1/4/05 7:32:11 AM Pacific Standard Time,=20 dominicscullion@email.com writes:   > I=E2=80=99m next playing at the vigil mass at my church on Saturday. Altho= ugh the=20 > Epiphany will already have been, does anyone think that it would be=20 > inappropriate for me to play Christmas Carols, such as =E2=80=98We Three K= ings=E2=80=99 and =E2=80=98See Amid=20 > the Winter=E2=80=99s Snow=E2=80=99? I am just asking because I am having a= disagreement=20 > about this with the Priest.   epiphany is a season, not just a day. at our church, we'll be celebrating i= t=20 until lent.  
(back) Subject: RE: Hymns for January From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 16:07:01 -0000   Thanks.   But do you not think that it is ludicrous to say Christmas is over by the 8th of January?   Dom     _____   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Gfc234@aol.com Sent: 04 January 2005 15:47 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Hymns for January       In a message dated 1/4/05 9:32:11 AM, dominicscullion@email.com writes:             I'm next playing at the vigil mass at my church on Saturday. Although the Epiphany will already have been, does anyone think that it would be inappropriate for me to play Christmas Carols, such as 'We Three Kings' = and 'See Amid the Winter's Snow'? I am just asking because I am having a disagreement about this with the Priest. Thanks, DS     a word to the wise- if you value your job-i strongly suggest that you agree with the preist-unless you are on very friendly and collegial terms with him- my two cents-       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net        
(back) Subject: RE: Hymns for January From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 16:09:27 -0000   Thanks for that.   That's me got some 'amo' to use against the priest!   Cheers.   Dom     _____   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of BlueeyedBear@aol.com Sent: 04 January 2005 16:03 To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Hymns for January     In a message dated 1/4/05 7:32:11 AM Pacific Standard Time, dominicscullion@email.com writes:         I'm next playing at the vigil mass at my church on Saturday. Although the Epiphany will already have been, does anyone think that it would be inappropriate for me to play Christmas Carols, such as 'We Three Kings' = and 'See Amid the Winter's Snow'? I am just asking because I am having a disagreement about this with the Priest.       epiphany is a season, not just a day. at our church, we'll be celebrating it until lent.    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns for January From: <Gfc234@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 11:12:00 EST     In a message dated 1/4/05 10:08:28 AM, dominicscullion@email.com writes:     >=20 >=20 > Thanks. > But do you not think that it is ludicrous to say Christmas is over by the= =20 > 8th of January? > Dom > =A0 >=20 >=20   I think it is ludicrous to lose your income and burn a bridge over a 2 minut= e=20 hymn-also-the priest is probably just trying to please the congregation,=20 whose donations pay your salary and keep the organ working-and the parish=20 afloat--they do love the xmas carols you know. somtimes its better to just g= ive in and=20 have fun! pick your battles wisely- gfc       Gregory Ceurvorst 1921 Sherman Ave. #GS Evanston, IL 60201 847.332.2788 home/fax 708.243.2549 mobile gfc234@aol.com gfc234@nextel.blackberry.net  
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns for January From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 11:12:17 EST   In a message dated 1/4/05 8:08:28 AM Pacific Standard Time, dominicscullion@email.com writes:   > But do you not think that it is ludicrous to say Christmas is over by = the > 8th of January?   not to me -- i'm usually ready for christmas to be over about two weeks before it arrives! LOL.  
(back) Subject: RE: Hymns for January From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 10:14:14 -0600 (GMT-06:00)   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns for January From: "Stephen Best" <stevebest@usadatanet.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 11:14:05 -0500   My church never has services on the actual day of Epiphany. Depending on the pastor, sometimes we celebrate it the Sunday before, sometimes the Sunday after. This year we celebrated it last Sunday, seasonal decorations were removed yesterday, and we're on to something else this week. If you play for a denomination where the priest has ultimate authority, perhaps you should defer to his/her wishes. I'm not sure this is the kind of matter that warrants going to battle -- or even = disagreeing.   Steve Best in Utica, NY   Dominic Scullion wrote:   > I'm next playing at the vigil mass at my church on Saturday. Although > the Epiphany will already have been, does anyone think that it would > be inappropriate for me to play Christmas Carols, such as 'We Three > Kings' and 'See Amid the Winter's Snow'? I am just asking because I am > having a disagreement about this with the Priest. > > Thanks, > > DS >    
(back) Subject: Re: Scholarship Question on Ornaments From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 11:33:59 EST   Scott:   I always like to get at the root, and the question is not how? but why? If you can adequately answer the question WHY? Then you will know the answer to how. Since ornaments spring up during the Baroque period, there has to be an underlying reason musicians needed, yes needed to play ornaments to fool the ear. I believe someone could receive high marks on a doctoral dissertation. Instruments were tuned to comma mean tone schemes by then, and many musicians were pushing the envelope to play music in more than the common keys. My theory is that the ornament purely and simply covered an interval that may have sounded sour, but fooling the ear with trills and mordents saved the day!   Now you also have to ask the question, If Equal temperament had always been used, the next question would have to be, would ornaments have developed with the same amount of use, or not at all. I seriously doubt it. Ornaments are nice enhancements But they certainly wouldn't have developed unless keys were chosen with pure thirds such as quarter comma mean tone and bored musicians wanting to play in all keys.   IMHO one would have to live with an instrument so tuned and the desire to transport your music to distant keys, and covering sour notes with a cute little trill or mordent depending upon the length of the note to be treated.   Food for thought. It won't come from books, but from experiencing first hand the instruments and tuning schemes of the period.   Ron Severin   PS i think an honorary Doctorate should be awarded to me at least for this insight.    
(back) Subject: Re: durufle's epiphany prelude From: "Malcolm Wechsler \(Mander Organs\)" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 11:36:46 -0500   Dear Old Blue Eyes,   As someone has just written, the work is based on the chant "Ecce = advenit" which is the introit to the Mass on the Feast of the Epiphany. = It is on page 459 of my Liber Usualis, although I am not sure that the = pagination is the same for different editions of the Liber. If that is = not easy to come by, I will gladly photocopy this short chant, and fax = it to you - just send me a fax number, and I'll send it right away. May = this enhance your pleasure in this wonderful work.   Cheers, and Happy New Year   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com =20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: BlueeyedBear@aol.com=20 To: pipechat@pipechat.org=20 Sent: Monday, January 03, 2005 10:54 AM Subject: durufle's epiphany prelude     does anybody know what the chant is durufle used in his prelude for = the introit to the epiphany?
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns for January From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 11:43:08 EST   Dominic:   I agree with the others, start sending out resumes for a new job, if you feel the need to battle with the priest. You won't get far, and being settled in a place, it's certainly unproductive to push the issue.   Ron    
(back) Subject: Re: Forgotten Treasures? From: "Karl Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersville.edu> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 11:27:07 -0500   I can't think of more worthy "forgotten treasures" than Sonata V in c by Guilmant or the Sonata in E-flat minor by Horatio Parker.   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: Scholarship Question on Ornaments From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 09:20:23 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   A wonderful, if fanciful idea, considering that ornamentation came not from the baroque, or the renaissance, but from medieval music; predominantly vocal music.   The problem is, it was never written down in earliest times, and modern performances are therefore guesswork for the most part; certainly in respect of medieval music.   With the flowering of the baroque, ornamentation (especially when used in non-expressive instrumental playing such as organ or harpsichord) is the most important means of expression, which in combination the "notes inegale" of the French school, produces moment of extraordinary tension and release.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK           --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Scott: > > I always like to get at the root, and the question > is not how? but why? > If you can adequately answer the question WHY? Then > you will know > the answer to how. Since ornaments spring up during > the Baroque > period, there has to be an underlying reason > musicians needed, > yes needed to play ornaments to fool the ear.   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com