PipeChat Digest #5057 - Wednesday, January 5, 2005
 
Re: Ornaments
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Alleluias in Lent!!
  by <DERREINETOR@aol.com>
Re: Alleluias in Lent!!
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Ornaments
  by <RonSeverin@aol.com>
Recital at Woolsey Hall, Yale University this Sunday (Cross posted)
  by "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net>
RE: Looking for Richard Purvis "Four Prayers in Tone" [Spam][71.1%]
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Hymns for January
  by "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com>
Re: Hymns for January
  by "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com>
Re: Question(s)
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Email Addresses
  by "wesley" <wcool@bellsouth.net>
Re: Recital at Woolsey Hall, Yale University this Sunday
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Email Addresses
  by "Berdie Bowlsby" <fasttoccata@sbcglobal.net>
Alleluias snuck into Lent
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Replacing Alleluias
  by "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Forgotten Treasures?
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re:   Hymns in January
  by "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com>
Re: Recital at Woolsey Hall, Yale University this Sunday (Cross posted)
  by "Malcolm Wechsler \(Mander Organs\)" <manderusa@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Ornaments From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 16:57:26 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I'm still in the box Ron!   Bach not writing the Gigue Fugue.....have I missed something?   Who else could have written it?   Great composers not qualified?   Vaughan Williams certainly was, Reger certainly was, Guilmant was a remarkable scholar, Widor was a great academic, Hindemith was an amazing theorist.   I suppose there is the general theory that "you can't keep a good man down".....Beethoven, Bach etc.   I was self taught more or less, and I'm quite sure that far greater minds than mine, have been quite capable of extending this to outstanding composition.   Even those without great paper qualification, nevertheless earned their stripes with great musicians. Mendelssohn had a very privileged upbringing and the best teachers. The English Virginalists all went through a kind of extended apprenticeship in the choir schools, and working alongside remarkable organists of the day.   I suppose that if one's name is Mozart, and you've written all the works from your middle period by the age of 24, then formal qualification are, to coin a phrase, somewhat academic.   Broadly speaking, it would be a big mistake to assume that great composers did not receive a great education; one way or another.   As for the poor closeted student worrying about the next ornament, I guess C P E Bach and Couperin didn't know what they were talking about, but they both left instructions.   A problem I FAILED to mention in Bach's music, were the MISSING ORNAMENTS.   I've mentioned this before, but the 1st Eb Trio Sonata is a classic example, where the first section is almost perfectly inverted. Without ornamentation, the inversion sounds strange, but there isn't a single one written down!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK     --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Hi Kip: > > I guess we got people to thinking outside the box, > and that's > a good thing. Every time this subject come up some > student > is cowering in his closet wondering about the > correct execution > of ornaments. Who puts this fear into them in the > first place. > Hey, two dishonorable doctorates works for me. Now > who wrote > Bach's eight Little Preludes and Fugues, Gigue > Fugue etc. > Bach couldn't have written them, but His name is on > them. > Amazing! This person ANONYMOUS must have lived a > long time. > Several Centuries in fact. Shall we proclaim he > wrote them for > another dishonorable doctorate. It's amazing again > that none > of the great composers specifically had one. Should > we correct > this also? Was this an English invention at Oxford? > Several > Virginalists seem to have one. I think I just > coined a new word.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Re: Alleluias in Lent!! From: <DERREINETOR@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 20:05:45 EST   No, Alan, we wouldn't use them, but "could get away with them". Really, we =   couldn't, not at St. Anglo-Catholic's Martyr of St. Sebastians and St. = Truman Capote. BUT, one COULD make a case for it. I was just pushing buttons.   cheers, Bill H.  
(back) Subject: Re: Alleluias in Lent!! From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 20:14:26 +0000   On 1/5/05 1:05 AM, "DERREINETOR@aol.com" <DERREINETOR@aol.com> wrote:   > No, Alan, we wouldn't use them, but "could get away with them". Really, w= e > couldn't, not at St. Anglo-Catholic's Martyr of St. Sebastians and St. Tr= uman > Capote. BUT, one COULD make a case for it. I was just pushing buttons. >=20 > cheers, > Bill H.=20   Yes, yes. I understand. Total agreement. And I=B9m old enough to enjoy the Truman Capote allusion. (Think of the poor guys who never heard of him, etc.)   Alan, thoroughly with you Har, and har har har.  
(back) Subject: Re: Ornaments From: <RonSeverin@aol.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 20:18:20 EST   Colin:   It seems some great scholar opined that Bach didn't write it either, the Gigue that is. I went after ornaments from the angle of necessity and musical tunings.   I didn't say Bach didn't get a good education he was gifted. As I understand it Fernando Germani was self taught, and look where he played for most of his career St. Peter's Basilica, and look at all the fine students he taught. He must have been gifted too. I'm sure Beethoven learned composition at his own knee, Mozart also gifted did great things in spite of his horrible father. Never heard he completed a university degree, but a lot of wanabe's rode these people's backs to write their doctoral thesis.   Ron Severin    
(back) Subject: Recital at Woolsey Hall, Yale University this Sunday (Cross posted) From: "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 17:38:11 -0800 (PST)   You are cordially invited to attend a Master of Music degree recital by my = former student, Frederick Teardo, at Woolsey Hall, Yale University. The = recital will take place at 8:00 p.m. this Sunday, January 9. The organ is = the famed Newberry Organ built in 1928 by the Skinner Organ Company. = Woolsey Hall is located at the corner of Grove and College Streets in New = Haven, CT. The program will be as follows: Finlandia, Op. 26 (trans. Fricker) - Jean Sibelius Sonata in E-flat - Edward C. Bairstow Fantasie ueber den Choral "Halleluja! Gott zu loben", Op. 52, No. 3 - Max = Reger Symphony No. 6 in B major, Op. 59 - Louis Vierne The Sibelius and the Reger works will be performed from memory. Normally = Fred performs recitals entirely from memory, but the length and = difficulty of this program are such that he has decided to play only two = works from memory. Fred studied with me from the time he began organ until he graduated from = high school. He earned his Bachelor of Music degree at the Eastman School = of Music, where he studied with David Higgs. Fred is currently a second = year student of Thomas Murray at Yale, where he was recently admitted to = the Master of Musical Arts degree program. Fred is organist of Battell = Chapel, the main Yale university chapel. I know that some may criticize this program as being long and very = challenging for the listener, as well as for the performer. That is = certainly true, but a degree recital at one of the world's premier = universities is not the same as a recital for a general audience in a = church. The purpose of a degree recital is for the performer to = demonstrate his skill and musicianship, which this program certainly does = in spades. Fred has told me that he has learned a tremendous amount from = Thomas Murray about many things, but especially about color and = registration, which I am sure will be in evidence throughout the program, = but particularly in the Sibelius transcription and the Bairstow Sonata. = Anyone who has heard Thomas Murray play the Finlandia at Woolsey, or has = heard his fabulous CD <The Transcriber's Art> will know that in the hand = of a real master like Thomas Murray, such transcriptions can be riveting = on a symphonic organ like the Newberry. I'm sure that Fred will give a = fine accounting of himself in these works, too. If you're there, please do = say "hello". Stephen Roberts Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT USA  
(back) Subject: RE: Looking for Richard Purvis "Four Prayers in Tone" [Spam][71.1%] From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 19:31:50 -0600   A friend on this list found it for me through inter-library loan.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of T B Sent: Tuesday, January 04, 2005 9:53 AM To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Looking for Richard Purvis "Four Prayers in Tone" [Spam][71.1%]   Last week, I was fortunate to hear a New Year's Eve organ recital at the   Christian Scientist Mother Church Aeolian-Skinner organ, here in Boston.   What moved me most was the organists rendering of "Supplication," from Richard Purvis' "Four Prayers In Tone." I understand this is long out of print and have discovered it was published by Witmark in 1951. Does anyone know who holds the copyright to Witmark's publications and if they may photocopy out of print titles for a nominal fee. Of course, if anyone has this in their collection and would like to sell, I would be happy to get it off your hands. Thanks!        
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns for January From: "Jim McFarland" <mcfarland6@juno.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 20:36:52 -0500   Typo: Proscribed, instead of prescribed as I meant.       You wrote: "Again, my uptight, Anglican tuppence-worth."     I say: "Exactly my point."     Jim,             On Tue, 4 Jan 2005 18:02:01 EST DERREINETOR@aol.com writes: Jim wrote:   "Isn't it tragic that we are not supposed to sing in celebration of the birth of Christ except at the very few times proscribed by some official centuries ago?"   If it were "proscribed", it would have been banned, prohibited. Roman, Anglican and Lutheran prayerbooks and hymnals give quite a bit of attention to the Incarnation throughout the liturgical year, especially in the broad selection of Eucharistic Prayers. Hymns such as "Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence" (suitable as a Communion/Post-Communion Hymn in all three traditions at any Eucharist at any time) speak to the Incarnation and are common to all three traditions. At least Roman and Anglican (and Orthodox) Traditions recognize the early Ecumenical Councils that brought us that "Centuries Ago" stuff--brought to you by the same people that brought you "The Bible"--the Canon of Scripture--as we know it. It would be probably easier to name an "official" that decided the date of Christmas than it would be to name everyone that attended the Ecumenical Councils that resulted in our Bible--and don't freak, but they were all CATHOLIC.   "I don't know about all of you, but I have mellowed in my old age. If a group of people in my church felt like celebrating the birth of Jesus by singing a Christmas Carol in February, I would say "play on!" "   See my reference to "Let All Mortal Flesh" and Prayerbooks in the above response.   "Most congregants could care less."   To that, I would say that "Most Congregants" should receive better Christian Education--both as Adults and as Children.   In traditions that celebrate the Eucharist with regularity and solemnity, the Incarnation and Christ's Oblation, his Sacrifice, is celebrated often--regardless of what hymns may be sung.   Again, my uptight, Anglican tuppence-worth.   Pax, Bill H.   Pax, Bill H. SJE Boston                 "Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you fall down an open manhole cover and die." --Mel Brooks
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns for January From: "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 19:53:12 -0600   Alan Freed wrote, WRT the "Alleluia" in LAMFKS, :   >Nor do I. But if somebody's really hyperscrupulous about it, we can = always >substitute "Kyrieleis." It works. > > to which I would observe that my personal preference would be "Miserere", rather than "Kyreieleis". I am aware of an instance when a choir was to scheduled to sing the Messiaen "O Sacrum Convivium" on Holy Thursday, and that same substituion, of "Miserere" for "Alleluia" was necessitated.   ns  
(back) Subject: Re: Question(s) From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 17:55:16 -0800   Arno Schuh wrote:   >Dear Jonathan, >your request reminds me that I am often wondering when I browse through = catalogues of sheet music, why nobody made recordings of >this available stuff. > > I think there are several reasons folks shy away from recording as you've mentioned above: - They don't have the funding - The music is too hard - They're worried no one would buy such obscure music - They themselves are afraid to step out and try an unfamiliar composer   >Dupre and the countless organ works you get on a single CD like = Mendelssohn, Durufle, Schumann, Brahms etc. >In the sheet music catalogues you'll also find a lot of interesting = programed selections i. e. pieces only for the pedals. >So I encurrage you to keep on recording such music. I enjoy it. > > > Well, thanks for your kind words! I enjoy discovering it myself!   >Greetings > >Arno > >   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Email Addresses From: "wesley" <wcool@bellsouth.net> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:06:22 -0500     Hello, Does anyone have any contact information for Mr. Robert Hebble? Thanks!   Wesley      
(back) Subject: Re: Recital at Woolsey Hall, Yale University this Sunday From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 21:47:10 +0000   On 1/5/05 1:38 AM, "Stephen Roberts" <sroberts01@snet.net> wrote:   > You are cordially invited to attend a Master of Music degree recital by m= y > former student, Frederick Teardo, >=20 I wish I could be there, even were I stone deaf. I=B9m not, but the trip is out of the question for me. But I would be honored to have my name listed among those extending most heartfelt congratulations on the occasion.   Much honored to have been invited,   Alan Freed =20    
(back) Subject: Re: Email Addresses From: "Berdie Bowlsby" <fasttoccata@sbcglobal.net> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 19:05:32 -0800 (PST)   Before I give out information on Robert Hebble, what is the reason for = needing to contact him, if I might ask? Berdie   wesley <wcool@bellsouth.net> wrote:   Hello, Does anyone have any contact information for Mr. Robert Hebble? Thanks!   Wesley       ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: List-Digest: List-Unsubscribe:    
(back) Subject: Alleluias snuck into Lent From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 22:19:26 +0000   On 1/5/05 1:53 AM, "Noel Stoutenburg" <mjolnir@ticnet.com> wrote:   > Alan Freed wrote, WRT the "Alleluia" in LAMFKS, : > >> Nor do I. But if somebody's really hyperscrupulous about it, we can = always >> substitute "Kyrieleis." It works. >> > to which I would observe that my personal preference would be > "Miserere", rather than "Kyreieleis".   Well, for you "contemp" types, that might be OK. Latin is FAR too modern for us. We're being liberal when we use a bit a Greek.   Tee hee, and loving the whole thing.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Replacing Alleluias From: "Alicia Zeilenga" <azeilenga@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 04 Jan 2005 22:56:18 -0600   Hello,   I want to know what everyone would think if I took the hymn Creator Spirit by Whose Aid (tune LASST UNS ERFREUEN) and took out the Alleluias and replaced them with "Praise to You, Lord". The number of syllables is correct and it's so lovely for Confirmation, even if we are doing Confirmation during Lent.   Alicia Zeilenga      
(back) Subject: Re: Forgotten Treasures? From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 23:05:01 -0600   Hello, Karl, et al: > I can't think of more worthy "forgotten treasures" than > Sonata V in c by Guilmant or the Sonata in E-flat minor > by Horatio Parker. I'm glad you mentioned Horatio Parker. He was a good composer and an American, at a time when nothing good seemed to come from the "colonies." I was impressed with the recording I made of his concerto for organ and orchestra. If some of his other organ solo literature is of this stature, maybe we ought to bring some of those pieces around again. F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Hymns in January From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 21:26:00 -0800 (PST)   > Date: Tue, 4 Jan 2005 16:09:27 -0000   Thanks for that.   That's me got some 'amo' to use against the priest!   Cheers.   Dom     Dominic,   First, "We Three Kings" isn't a Christmas Carol, but an Epiphany carol. There are carols for Easter and every other season of the year. In the Episcopal Church (my chosen flavor) we celebrate the Epiphany season from January 6 - The Feast of the Epiphany - right up to Lent. The Church Musicians Handbook is liberally sprinkled with epiphany hymns right up to that time. Last Sunday I played at Grace Church in White Plains and we did We Three Kings and other epiphany related texts though it was really Christmas II in the liturgical year. Some churches will be emphasizing the epiphany next Sunday. Depends on how the clergy feel about it. Larger churches would have a service on Thursday to celebrate the actual day.   I don't think I would write your "ammo" statement on the internet. It's amazing how church members/clergy/etc will Google their organists name or e-mail address out of curiousity. I know one extraordinarily talented organist who has posted much on these lists who lost a job because he wrote some really damning stuff about the minister of his church, figuring she would never see it on this little organ list. A friend told me well before he was fired that that was going to happen because a church consistory member was lurking on the organ lists and had been giving his postings to the minister for ages. Suddenly he was having all kinds of difficulties at his church (which he reported to us) and then was fired. I don't think he ever had a clue why things went sour. Things you write live on forever in the archives. Music search committees regularly google candidates names to find out what isn't in their application materials.   There are many things worth fighting for. Which Sunday we celebrate Epiphany on doesn't seem like one of them to me. I would state my own feelings on the matter, but if my priest objected, I'd go with his preference. The ideal is to work in a situation where you are wonderfully in agreement with the clergy on matters. I have enjoyed that in almost every job I have held, but if it isn't to be, look for another job. If it's just a disagreement over Epiphany, well, suck it up. And don't carry your disagreements onto the internet.   Best,   Ken     =3D=3D=3D=3D=3D The National Government will regard it as its first and foremost duty to = revive in the nation the spirit of unity and cooperation, It will = preserve and defend those basic principles on which our nation has been = built. It regards Christianity as the foundation of our national = morality, and the family as the basis of national life." --Adolph Hitler, February 1, 1933 (what goes around comes around)  
(back) Subject: Re: Recital at Woolsey Hall, Yale University this Sunday (Cross posted) From: "Malcolm Wechsler \(Mander Organs\)" <manderusa@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 00:31:09 -0500   Having posted about Andrew Henderson's concert at St. Ignatius on Sunday = at 4, I saw Fred Teardo's first posting about his own Woolsey recital = that same day without an indication of the time, and groaned a little = groan of frustration. However, I thought most Woolsey Sunday events were = at 8 p.m., which Fred confirmed in his second posting. I can do this! As = the last notes of <Dieu parmi nous> fade away, I can race down the nave = aisle flapping my arms and shouting "God IS among us, " leaping out of = the west doors and into my illegally parked car, and heading for the = Parkway north. This will be about 4:30, giving me more than two hours to = be in New Haven, supercharger whining away. It can be done. If you have = the stamina, try to hear both Andrew Henderson at St. Ignatius Loyola, = NY at 4 and Fred Teardo at Woolsey Hall at 8. It will be an amazing day. = Even if you can only hear one, you will be well rewarded. These guys, = whose friendships I value highly, are strong and stylish players, and = each concert is an important event, and I will hate it if for any reason = I have to miss. I hope to see some of you.   Happy New Year,   Malcolm Wechsler www.mander-organs.com =20 ----- Original Message -----=20 From: Stephen Roberts=20 To: PipeChat ; PIPORG-L@listserv.albany.edu=20 Sent: Tuesday, January 04, 2005 8:38 PM Subject: Recital at Woolsey Hall, Yale University this Sunday (Cross = posted)     You are cordially invited to attend a Master of Music degree recital = by my former student, Frederick Teardo, at Woolsey Hall, Yale = University. The recital will take place at 8:00 p.m. this Sunday, = January 9. The organ is the famed Newberry Organ built in 1928 by the = Skinner Organ Company. Woolsey Hall is located at the corner of Grove = and College Streets in New Haven, CT.   The program will be as follows:   Finlandia, Op. 26 (trans. Fricker) - Jean Sibelius Sonata in E-flat - Edward C. Bairstow Fantasie ueber den Choral "Halleluja! Gott zu loben", Op. 52, No. 3 - = Max Reger Symphony No. 6 in B major, Op. 59 - Louis Vierne   Stephen Roberts Western Connecticut State University, Danbury, CT USA