PipeChat Digest #5058 - Thursday, January 6, 2005
 
RE: Alleluias in Lent!!
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
RE: Replacing Alleluias
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Re: Ornaments
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Alleluias and French Horns
  by "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com>
This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
RE: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "Russ Parker" <rparker@heightscpc.org>
Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Question(s)
  by "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de>
Weird Hieroglyphics in messages to the lists
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
RE: Hymns in January [Spam][63.7%]
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com>
Re: Question(s)
  by "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net>
Trent Sims Plays Rochester 4/23 Wurlitzer on Jan. 16 (cross-posted)
  by "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Jazz theory for the church organist
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Jazz theory for the church organist
  by "Robert Bell" <bobbell@optonline.net>
Re: Jazz theory for the church organist
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Randy's Aria
  by "Robert Bell" <bobbell@optonline.net>
Re: Jazz theory for the church organist
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Randy's Aria
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
RE: Jazz theory for the church organist
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Jazz theory for the church organist
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
 

(back) Subject: RE: Alleluias in Lent!! From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 13:49:44 -0000   Not too subtle a distinction at all Alan. People stop whatever they have given up on Sundays.   Dominic       _____   From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of = Alan Freed Sent: 04 January 2005 19:14 To: PipeChat Subject: Alleluias in Lent!!     On 1/5/05 12:00 AM, "DERREINETOR@aol.com" <DERREINETOR@aol.com> wrote:   That's what we'd do at St. John's. Besides, one COULD get away with "alleluia" on Sundays during Lent as they are "Sundays IN Lent", not = "Lenten Sundays", as you well know.     Right. Though generally we do not use "Alleluia" even on Sundays in Lent. (Perhaps too subtle a distinction?)   Alan    
(back) Subject: RE: Replacing Alleluias From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 13:49:44 -0000   I say if it fits, go for it. I've known people to replace 'England's mountains' to 'Scotland's mountains' in Parry's 'Jerusalem'!   DS     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Alicia Zeilenga Sent: 05 January 2005 04:56 To: PipeChat Subject: Replacing Alleluias     Hello,     I want to know what everyone would think if I took the hymn Creator   Spirit by Whose Aid (tune LASST UNS ERFREUEN) and took out the Alleluias   and replaced them with "Praise to You, Lord". The number of syllables   is correct and it's so lovely for Confirmation, even if we are doing   Confirmation during Lent.     Alicia Zeilenga         ******************************************************************   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!"   PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics   HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org   List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org   Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org   List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org>   List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org>   List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: Ornaments From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 06:13:02 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   We have some misconceptions about academia. The status of musicians in, say, the 18th century (and artists generally) was always regarded as that of a skilled artisan and tradesman: employees who were required to perform certain duties and remain firmly in their social place.   Some will immediately recall the problems Bach and Mozart had with church authorities and aristocrats.....what grovelling letters they wrote to their "superiors".   The idea of the modern university was completely strange to past ages; though by the 18th century, there was a growing interest in the sciences and mathematics. For the most part, the universities were very much centres of theological and legal study, and were one of the few places where precious books could be found and compared in some quantity.   Being quite lowly souls, musicians learned their trade by way of apprenticeships and articles; often in the great cathedrals, where they would probably start as boy choristers. Thus, the CHURCH was the music college and university of the day.   Music and the employment of musicians, was entirely supported by religious and aristocratic patronage.   Generally speaking, I can't think of many churches that confer degrees, but I can think of a few which have contributed more to musical art than most of the world's universities put together.   If, after a long and demanding "apprenticeship", a musician was appointed as a cathedral organist, we can take it for granted that they were not only competent, but VERY skilled and VERY educated.   I suspect that until the 19th century "powerhouses" of learning, most students of almost anything, "rode on the backs" of others.........sometimes quite literally by all accounts!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- RonSeverin@aol.com wrote:   > Colin: > > I'm sure Beethoven learned composition > at his own knee, > Mozart also gifted did great things in spite of his > horrible father. > Never heard he completed a university degree, but a > lot of wanabe's > rode these people's backs to write their doctoral > thesis.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Alleluias and French Horns From: "David Baker" <dgb137@mac.com> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 11:19:38 -0500   IIRC, when Canon West was running things at St. John the Divine in NYC, Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence was ALWAYS the offertory hymn, even in Lent, alleluias and all.   Also, on the French Horn issue, there is a French Horn in the Solo Division (I believe) of the Skinner/Harrison at St. John the Divine. David Baker   On Tuesday, January 4, 2005, at 07:57 PM, PipeChat wrote:   > That's what we'd do at St. John's. Besides, one COULD get away with > "alleluia" on Sundays during Lent as they are "Sundays IN Lent", not > "Lenten Sundays", > as you well know. They are feasts of the Resurrection. > > touchee, > Bill H.    
(back) Subject: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 09:15:31 -0800   Hello Friends...   This week I present to you Randy Runyon's Aria: http://evensongmusic.net/audio/Aria.mp3 (5.12mb high quality) or http://evensongmusic.net/audio/LQ/AriaLQ.mp3 (871kb low quality for dial-up users)   This is not a difficult piece, but I find myself listening to it over and over..... Randy's harmonies are lush and beautiful, the melody also.   Enjoy!   -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: RE: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "Russ Parker" <rparker@heightscpc.org> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 10:48:12 -0700   This is a beautiful piece. Do you know where it is published? A search = at my usual retailers turned up nothing. Thanks, Russ Parker   -----Original Message----- From: Jonathan Orwig [mailto:giwro@adelphia.net] Sent: Wednesday 05 January 2005 10.16 To: undisclosed-recipients Subject: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria     Hello Friends...   This week I present to you Randy Runyon's Aria: http://evensongmusic.net/audio/Aria.mp3 (5.12mb high quality) or http://evensongmusic.net/audio/LQ/AriaLQ.mp3 (871kb low quality for=20 dial-up users)   This is not a difficult piece, but I find myself listening to it over=20 and over..... Randy's harmonies are lush and beautiful, the melody also.=20   Enjoy!   --=20 Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net     ****************************************************************** "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>    
(back) Subject: Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 10:16:42 -0800   <chuckle>   This mp3 was a "teaser" It's very likely I'll be issuing it via Evensongmusic website...   I'll keep the lists informed!   -J   Russ Parker wrote:   >This is a beautiful piece. Do you know where it is published? A search = at my usual retailers turned up nothing. >Thanks, >Russ Parker > >-----Original Message----- >From: Jonathan Orwig [mailto:giwro@adelphia.net] >Sent: Wednesday 05 January 2005 10.16 >To: undisclosed-recipients >Subject: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria > > >Hello Friends... > >This week I present to you Randy Runyon's Aria: >http://evensongmusic.net/audio/Aria.mp3 (5.12mb high quality) >or >http://evensongmusic.net/audio/LQ/AriaLQ.mp3 (871kb low quality for >dial-up users) > >This is not a difficult piece, but I find myself listening to it over >and over..... Randy's harmonies >are lush and beautiful, the melody also. > >Enjoy! > > >     -- Jonathan Orwig Evensong Music, Media and Graphics New Choral and Organ Music http://www.evensongmusic.net    
(back) Subject: Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 13:39:00 +0000   On 1/5/05 5:15 PM, "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> wrote:   > This week I present to you Randy Runyon's Aria:   How very, VERY nice indeed! Takes me back to my first visit to St. Mark's Cathedral in Seattle, shortly after the War.   Thank you, Randy and Jon.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 13:07:33 -0600   Hi, Jonathan:   I want this "Aria" to give a friend in printed score.   Will be watching for your announcement.   F. Richard Burt     .. > This mp3 was a "teaser" It's very likely I'll be issuing it via > Evensongmusic website... > > I'll keep the lists informed!      
(back) Subject: Re: Question(s) From: "Arno Schuh" <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 22:28:12 +0100     From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> > Arno Schuh wrote: > > >your request reminds me that I am often wondering when I browse through = catalogues of sheet music, why nobody made recordings of > >this available stuff. > > > > > I think there are several reasons folks shy away from recording as > you've mentioned above: > - They don't have the funding   Imho. not really a reason. There are so much music available on CD where = I'm asking meself: Who payed for this? Nobody is forced to put a 20 page booklet in 3, 4 languages into the jewel box. I don't know if Brilliant Classics is known in the US. However, I'm = primarly interested in the music, listen to the music, and so a single sheet, a folded sheet, including a track list and possibly the = specification is enough.   > - The music is too hard   Imho. also no reason. There are so much trash available on CD. So I = suppose, especially in the organ scene, there are enough organ buffs around interested in anything that's played from a special artist = and/or played on a special organ, and/or interested in a special programe etc.   > - They're worried no one would buy such obscure music   Imho. also not really a reason. Why do you think somebody publish such = music as sheet music when nobody would buy it? Why should somebody buy such music as sheet music, but nobody wants listen to it? = Play it for yourself in an empty church? Or at home? Only to read it, study it by reading, not playing? I can't believe that.   > - They themselves are afraid to step out and try an unfamiliar composer > There are so much stuff available on CD I am not interested in. But the = organist, producer or who ever is very proud of his release, thinks somebody like it. Or why should they release it. Some labels = specialiced in publishing such "world premiere recordings". Often music that's not available as sheet music.   Greetings   Arno    
(back) Subject: Weird Hieroglyphics in messages to the lists From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 18:19:33 -0500   I am writing this reminder to all those who seem to have lapsed into writing their messages to both the lists in anything but plain text.   As a person who has to resort to a screen reader, it makes it impossible = to sort out what the messages are saying due to things like =3D20 or = =3DE80=3D99.   it would be annoying even if I were able to see well enough to read the messages with my own eyes, but for those of us who need the help of a screen reader, the technology isn't there to decode all the hieroglyphics that comes with these messages.   Can I make a plea for straight text, - please?   Bob Conway    
(back) Subject: RE: Hymns in January [Spam][63.7%] From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@direcway.com> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 18:28:06 -0600   I agree with Kenneth, except that I must point out that the season of Epiphany celebrates several Biblical 'epiphanies' or manifestations of Jesus as the Christ. These are generally celebrated one each Sunday. The Wise Men's visitation, the wedding at Cana, the baptism of Christ, Christ's announcement that he is the Messiah, his first miracles, and the transfiguration are all examples singled out during this season. So we are past Christmas and heading headlong toward Lent and Easter.   Glenda Sutton gksjd85@direcway.com     -----Original Message----- From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org] On Behalf Of Kenneth Potter   First, "We Three Kings" isn't a Christmas Carol, but an Epiphany carol. There are carols for Easter and every other season of the year. In the Episcopal Church (my chosen flavor) we celebrate the Epiphany season from January 6 - The Feast of the Epiphany - right up to Lent. The Church Musicians Handbook is liberally sprinkled with epiphany hymns right up to that time. Last Sunday I played at Grace Church in White Plains and we did We Three Kings and other epiphany related texts though it was really Christmas II in the liturgical year. Some churches will be emphasizing the epiphany next Sunday. Depends on how the clergy feel about it. Larger churches would have a service on Thursday to celebrate the actual day.        
(back) Subject: Re: Question(s) From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 18:07:34 -0800   On Wed, 5 Jan 2005 22:28:12 +0100, Arno Schuh <arno.schuh@in-trier.de> wrote:   > > From: "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> >> Arno Schuh wrote: >> >> >your request reminds me that I am often wondering when I browse >> through catalogues of sheet music, why nobody made recordings of >> >this available stuff. >> > >> > >> I think there are several reasons folks shy away from recording as >> you've mentioned above: >> - They don't have the funding > > Imho. not really a reason. There are so much music available on CD where = > I'm asking meself: Who payed for this?   <chuckle> Well... we will have to agree to disagree on this... OLD music (pre-1922 in the USA) does not have the cost to release CDs that modern music does... for modern music one has to pay Mechanical License fees BEFORE ever selling even one CD (and even if one's stock of Cds is NEVER sold!) These fees are calculated according to the length of a piece, and can run =   into quite a bit of money on a 70+ minute CD...   Nobody is forced to > put a 20 page booklet in 3, 4 languages into the jewel box. > I don't know if Brilliant Classics is known in the US. However, I'm > primarly interested in the music, listen to the music, and so a > single sheet, a folded sheet, including a track list and possibly the > specification is enough.   I would agree for the most part, although I _do_ appreciate learning more about the composers, especially if I am unfamiliar with them   >> - The music is too hard > > Imho. also no reason. There are so much trash available on CD. So I > suppose, especially in the organ scene, there are enough organ > buffs around interested in anything that's played from a special artist =   > and/or played on a special organ, and/or interested in a > special programe etc.   <chuckle>   I'll disagree again - let me explain: There are plenty of folks who _can_ play this music, but there is no guarantee of sales... Some of the works are VERY daunting to learn, and it is hard = to justify learning it with no promise of any profit. (which is actually a very stupid reason... one does not usually make much money on organ CD sales - just ask someone who knows!)     >> - They're worried no one would buy such obscure music > > Imho. also not really a reason. Why do you think somebody publish such =   > music as sheet music when nobody would buy it? Why should > somebody buy such music as sheet music, but nobody wants listen to it? > Play it for yourself in an empty church? Or at home? > Only to read it, study it by reading, not playing? I can't believe that.   Oh Arno... TONS (KILOGRAMS?) of music has been written and published that NO ONE buys. Let me explain again:   Most music publishers have a "new issue" policy - in order for a music retailer to receive a good discount on their regular orders, they must agree to buy = copies of this new music... Therefore, the publishers are GUARANTEED to sell enough of the music to make a profit. I worked in a music store, and we had STACKS of this new stuff that we never sold... at the American Guild of Organists convention this summer, I bought 33 pieces of music for ONE US DOLLAR EACH! These were in 6 or 8 large bins, and much of it looked like it had =   been around for YEARS. I said to one of the clerks "Looks like you have about 30-40 years of new issue there!" To which he replied "Yes, nearly ALL of that is unsold New Issue". I got there after the organist feeding =   frenzy had taken place, so there was not as much music left as earlier in =   the week, but I estimate there was between 1000 to 2000 scores there.... =   After tax, my music cost under $39 US... if I had bought it at regular market price, it would have been cloe to a THOUSAND dollars of music       >> - They themselves are afraid to step out and try an unfamiliar composer >> > There are so much stuff available on CD I am not interested in. But the =   > organist, producer or who ever is very proud of his release, > thinks somebody like it. Or why should they release it. Some labels > specialiced in publishing such "world premiere recordings". > Often music that's not available as sheet music.   Maybe they are like myself - they realize that not very many people might buy the music, but they want to make the recording anyway. Often these recordings are sponsored by a State cultural entity, Bank or wealthy private individual... so, it doesn't really MATTER if anyone buys the CDS   Cheers,   Jonathan     -- Using Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2/  
(back) Subject: Trent Sims Plays Rochester 4/23 Wurlitzer on Jan. 16 (cross-posted) From: "Kenneth Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 22:00:36 -0500   The Rochester Theater Organ Society is very pleased to present Ohio's = Trent Sims for his encore performance at our 4/23 Wurlitzer pipe organ. This = event will be held in the NEW Auditorium Theatre, 875 East Main Street, = Rochester, NY 14605 on Sunday afternoon, January 16 at 2:30 PM.   Tickets at only $15 each will go on sale at the box office one hour before =   the concert start.   You are invited to visit our website at http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/ for concert details, driving directions and much more. Attend this concert =   to learn why his first Rochester performance in 2003 won him so many fans insisting on his return to our console for an encore performance.   Submitted by: Ken Evans, RTOS Director (past-President), kevans1@rochester.rr.com      
(back) Subject: Jazz theory for the church organist From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 22:39:28 +0000   But FIRST: Reporting that Will and Ros Light and I had a wonderful supper together tonight, and then went to Epiphany Eve service. And MORE eating after that, in the parish lounge. A WONDERFUL time was had by all, in = spite of lousy weather crippling the attendance, and a WORSE forecast that darn near KILLED the service. (It was still fine, sitting next to Ros; that = lady can SING!)       Here's everything the contemporary church organist needs to know about Jazz theory.   Yogi Berra explains Jazz: An interview   Interviewer: Can you explain jazz?   Yogi: I can't, but I will. 90% of all jazz is half improvisation. The other half is the part people play while others are playing something they never played with anyone who played that part. If you play the right = part, it might be right if you play it wrong enough. But if you play it too right, it's wrong.   Interviewer: I don't understand.   Yogi: Anyone who understands jazz knows that you can't understand it. = It's too complicated. That's what's so simple about it.   Interviewer: Do you understand it?   Yogi: No. That's why I can explain it. If I understood it, I wouldn't know anything about it.   Interviewer: Are there any great jazz players alive today?   Yogi: No. All the great jazz players alive today are dead. Except for the ones that are still alive. But so many of them are dead, that the = ones that are still alive are dying to be like the ones that are dead. Some would kill for it.   Interviewer: What is syncopation?   Yogi: That's when the note that you should hear now happens either before or after you hear it. In jazz, you don't hear notes when they happen because that would be some other type of music. Other types of music can = be jazz, but only if they're the same as something different from those other kinds.   Interviewer: Now I really don't understand.   Yogi: I haven't taught you enough for you to not understand jazz that = well.   <end forward>   It reminds me of one I heard about an old dictionary definition of syncopation: "staggering unevenly from bar to bar."    
(back) Subject: RE: Jazz theory for the church organist From: "Robert Bell" <bobbell@optonline.net> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 22:48:50 -0500   Alan, That's the best "Yogi" I've heard in a long time! Thank you for sharing.   Bob      
(back) Subject: Re: Jazz theory for the church organist From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 22:50:18 -0500     On Jan 5, 2005, at 5:39 PM, Alan Freed wrote:   > Yogi Berra explains Jazz: An interview > >   This is the funniest thing I have read in a very long time. But surely Yogi didn't really say all of that. Some gag writer made it all up, right?   Did you get my explanation of sans-culottes OK, Alan?   Randy Runyon    
(back) Subject: Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 22:52:16 -0500     On Jan 5, 2005, at 8:39 AM, Alan Freed wrote:   > On 1/5/05 5:15 PM, "Jonathan Orwig" <giwro@adelphia.net> wrote: > >> This week I present to you Randy Runyon's Aria: > > How very, VERY nice indeed! Takes me back to my first visit to St. > Mark's > Cathedral in Seattle, shortly after the War. >   Glad you like it, Alan. But I'm still trying to figure out this connection.   Randy R.    
(back) Subject: Randy's Aria From: "Robert Bell" <bobbell@optonline.net> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 22:56:19 -0500   Randy,   I heard the mp3 of "Aria" on Jonathans site. Beautiful piece of music. Enjoyed listening to it several times. Thanks,   Bob      
(back) Subject: Re: Jazz theory for the church organist From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 19:58:37 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   That's wonderful Alan! Hee hee!   Much as I hate the piece, I used to jazz up the jazz, so to speak, by playing Templetons "Bach goes to town" with added (and I might suggest, stylistically correct) inegality.   This had the effect of killing all the syncopation, at which point, I discovered this to be a truly awful piece of music!   Actually, inegality has to be one of those art-forms which totally defy analysis or scoring, just like Jazz in fact.   Perhaps that's why no-one understands it.....they just feel it.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK   --- Alan Freed <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> wrote:     > Here's everything the contemporary church organist > needs to know about Jazz theory.     __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Randy's Aria From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 22:59:00 -0500   Thanks very much, Bob!   Randy     On Jan 5, 2005, at 10:56 PM, Robert Bell wrote:   > Randy, > > I heard the mp3 of "Aria" on Jonathans site. > Beautiful piece of music. Enjoyed listening to it several times. > Thanks, > > Bob > > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> >    
(back) Subject: RE: Jazz theory for the church organist From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 17:27:43 +1300   >Much as I hate the piece, I used to jazz up the jazz, so to speak, by playing Templetons "Bach goes to town" with added (and I might suggest, stylistically correct) inegality.   We might, perhaps unkindly, suggest that Templeton wrote what he intended and that to be "stylistically correct" his intentions need to be followed. = I know of no post-WWII composer who would expect the player to alter his timings dramatically.   >This had the effect of killing all the syncopation, at which point, I discovered this to be a truly awful piece of music!   Sure, altering the note values dramatically from what the composer = intended has a habit of killing a piece of music. That doesn't make it truly awful, but merely someone's deliberately-distorted interpretation of it. I s'pose Leroy Anderson's "The Syncopated Clock" would sound "truly awful", too, if the synocpation was removed. The whole thing just might, possibly, at a peradventure, conceivably, lose the whole point of the thing.   I still reckon the best performance of "Bach Goes to Town" is the harpsichord performance of George Malcolm.   Harruuummmmppppphhhhhh!!!!!!!!!   Ross      
(back) Subject: Re: Jazz theory for the church organist From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 23:23:49 +0000   On 1/6/05 3:48 AM, "Robert Bell" <bobbell@optonline.net> wrote:   > That's the best "Yogi" I've heard in a long time! Thank you for sharing.   I wish I could credit the source. But I received it anonymously, with a notation that the source MIGHT become available. If it does, I'll pass it on.   Alan