PipeChat Digest #5059 - Thursday, January 6, 2005
 
Re: Jazz theory for the church organist
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
new swell chest
  by "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com>
Organ and harp recital
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
Re: Organ and harp recital
  by "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com>
Re: Organ and harp recital
  by <BlueeyedBear@aol.com>
RE: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Organ and harp recital
  by "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net>
1801 George Pike England Organ, St. Margaret's Lothbury, London
  by "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com>
String chorus???
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
RE: Jazz theory for the church organist
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Seattle Cathedral - was String Chorus
  by "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com>
Re: 1801 George Pike England Organ, St. Margaret's Lothbury, London
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Renaissance Allen Digital Organ
  by "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com>
Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Renaissance Allen Digital Organ
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Fwd: 1940s CBS Radio music broadcasts
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: Seattle Cathedral - was String Chorus
  by "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net>
Re: 1940s CBS Radio music broadcasts
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Randy Runyon's Aria
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: 1801 George Pike England Organ, St. Margaret's Lothbury, London
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Jazz theory for the church organist From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 05 Jan 2005 23:36:43 +0000   On 1/6/05 3:50 AM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > Did you get my explanation of sans-culottes OK, Alan?   Oh, did I EVER! Can't believe I didn't acknowledge. There are two cafes (=B2bistros=B2?) of that name in Manhattan (same ownership, I think). Tonight was my first visit to either one=8Bwith Will Light of this list, and his wife= , Ros. I was all prepared to come off as the wizard on the subject, but, sophisticates that THEY are, I got the impression that they were familiar with all of it, and EYE was the only dunce in the room.   Well, except =B3no more,=B2 thanks to you!   Alan   P.S.: The food was EXCELLENT. Appetizer (unlimited meets/cheeses), entr=E9e= , desert, $22. I had canard in cherry sauce. Yum! (Skipped desert.)  
(back) Subject: Re: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 00:33:43 +0000   On 1/6/05 3:52 AM, "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> wrote:   > Glad you like it, Alan. But I'm still trying to figure out this connecti= on. >=20 Oh! (Reasonable question.) Well, I was maybe 15 or 16 at the time. As little as I know about organs and registration NOW, I knew even less then, if that=B9s possible. But I was in such AWE of what I now suppose to have been oceans of string chorus. A sound I've ever since associated with "proper" Anglican music=8Bbut NOT at ALL characteristic of Lutheran organ music that was MY language. But SUCH a lush sound!   Your =B3Aria=B2 (as recorded) utilizes that sound.   That's the best I can do to explain it.   I can kind of date it because it was in 1943 that we lived near St. Mark=B9s. I was only 11, but had a bicycle, and would cycle down to that huge concret= e pile now and then. During the war, the cathedral was owned by the federal government (I think they held the mortgage, and the diocese of Olympia couldn=B9t keep up); then, for a while, it housed a huge Red Cross facility o= f some sort. So it went back to the Church only after about 1945 or 1946, I think (maybe later), by which time I=B9d traded in my bike for a $50 1936 Plymouth=8Bno, that was 1950! Anyway, all that is ancient history, and everybody but me knows about the current organ at St. Mark=B9s. Flentrop?=8Bmore Lutheranish, I suspect, than what had been there.   Alan  
(back) Subject: new swell chest From: "GB" <gblack@ocslink.com> Date: Wed, 5 Jan 2005 23:41:26 -0600   Hi List, I received my brand new swell chest of 7 ranks made by Howell = Pipe Organs of Sterling, Illinois last Thursday. Pipes are on the chest now and winding will be done soon. Can't wait. = Gary    
(back) Subject: Organ and harp recital From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 06:18:04 -0500   Dear listers,   I'm only aware of a few pieces for organ and harp. The Grandjany "Aria in Classic Style", there's a Charles Callahan "Legend", there are various lighter arrangements of things by Daniel Burton.   Can you help with other pieces suitable for a short (30 minute) recital? This is for a pretty sophisticated crowd, I'd like to give them some new and interesting things.   Chuck Peery St. Louis    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and harp recital From: "M Fox" <ophicleide16@direcway.com> Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 07:08:53 -0800     ----- Original Message -----=20 From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 3:18 AM Subject: Organ and harp recital     > Dear listers, > > I'm only aware of a few pieces for organ and harp. The Grandjany "Aria i= n=20 > Classic Style", there's a Charles Callahan "Legend", there are various=20 > lighter arrangements of things by Daniel Burton. > > Can you help with other pieces suitable for a short (30 minute) recital?= =20 > This is for a pretty sophisticated crowd, I'd like to give them some new= =20 > and interesting things.   The only things I find among my records are:   Suite for Harp & Organ Louis L. White Nocturne in Eb for harmonium, cello & harp Marcel Tournier Serenade for a Christmas Night Conrad Susa Diversions for Harp and Organ Daniel Pinkham Elegy for Harp, Violin & Organ Harold Friedell Sommeil de l'enfant J=E9sus (harp, viola, organ) Henri B=FCsser   MAF   Se  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and harp recital From: <BlueeyedBear@aol.com> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 10:09:06 EST   In a message dated 1/6/05 4:19:41 AM Pacific Standard Time, cepeery@earthlink.net writes:   > I'm only aware of a few pieces for organ and harp. The Grandjany "Aria > in Classic Style", there's a Charles Callahan "Legend", there are > various lighter arrangements of things by Daniel Burton. > > Can you help with other pieces suitable for a short (30 minute) > recital? This is for a pretty sophisticated crowd, I'd like to give > them some new and interesting things.   chuck, if you're going to do the grandjany, i suggest you give the harpist =   the music YESTERDAY! the piece is sight-readable for the organist but a = major bitch for the harpist. (my sis-in-law is a harpist, and she told me that = she and all the harpists she knows hate the piece because it's so hard. in = fact, in a former city i contacted the symphony harpist to ask her if she was interested in performing it, and she replied, "i'm scared of that piece.")   just a warning. if you've already found someone to play, congrats! and = can you give me his/her phone number? (just kidding)   scot  
(back) Subject: RE: This week's MP3: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 04:38:25 +1300   >But I was in such AWE of what I now suppose to have been oceans of = string chorus. =A0A sound I've ever since associated with "proper" Anglican = music=97   You've got me curious, now. Yes, genuinely, because I've never even = remotely associated "oceans of string chorus" with anything even vaguely = Anglican. I don't believe there is in anything in the Church of England, New = Zealand, South African, Scottish, Irish or Australian Anglican traditions that = calls for any string chorus whatever. With that, only rarely are even a pair = of strings called for. String Celestes (be they Salicionals, Gambas or whatever) are really bad news for accompanying voices, and the Anglican tradition is about accompanying voices, be it choir or congregation.   As for choruses of strings, there are none in New Zealand at all, in any = of our eight cathedrals, and I can think of only a very tiny handful in the entire UK.   So, please enlighten me how your feelings came to be what you have = stated, in the USA.=20   Ross    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ and harp recital From: "Charles Peery" <cepeery@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 10:42:40 -0600 (GMT-06:00)   Could not copy the message to the digest, there was no plain text part
(back) Subject: 1801 George Pike England Organ, St. Margaret's Lothbury, London From: "Daniel Hancock" <dhancock@brpae.com> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 11:08:46 -0600   I recently heard word from my organ instructor, Dr. Earline Moulder of Dr= ury University, Springfield, that she will be playing the 1801 George Pik= e England Organ of St. Margaret's, Lothbury in London on January 13 for a= GALA. This is reportedly that same organ that Mendelssohn once played.=20   Curious to learn about it, I looked to see what I could find, and found t= he following site:   http://www.stml.org.uk/stml_organ.html   Though it credits the organ as being 1801, and "restored" in 1984 by John= Budgen, on the specification it asterisks stops containing pipes from th= e 1801 organ. =20   I don't understand exactly what this means. Does it mean that the organ = had been modified over time, and John Budgen restored it to as near origi= nal as possible, using the original pipes and reconstructed ones?   Or, does it mean that John Budgen "restored" the 1801 instrument, modifyi= ng, repitching, and revoicing original ranks? In which case, it wouldn't= be a restoration at all?   What's the story on this instrument?   Daniel   Timothy Daniel Hancock Springfield, Missouri =A0 "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful committed citizens can chan= ge the world - indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."=A0 --Margaret= Mead  
(back) Subject: String chorus??? From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 12:46:24 +0000   Ross, I'll try. Maybe I've got this entirely wrong. Remember, it was nearly sixty years ago; I=B9d never touched an organ. (I was barely pubescent.)   First, I associate the sound NOT with singing at all, but with "communion" or =B3traveling=B2 music, etc. The organ (then) in St. Mark's had this great big cubical BOX (beautiful filigreed wood work against the harsh concrete walls) just north of the chancel. The sound was very much under expression= , VERY much in use. Certainly not a reed sound, nor flutes at any pitch. Is it just a 1920s Skinner sound? Narrow scale, multiple stops; surely celestes at work; rich harmonics. Paucity of mixtures, if ANY. Gentle 16= =B9 or even 32=B9 Bourdon or Violone? anchoring everything in the bottom octave o= f the pedal. No obvious =B3structure=B2 or =B3form.=B2 Quite possibly more improvisatory than composed. It=B9s the FARTHEST thing from a Lutheran/baroque sound. This is NOT L=FCbeck! But MOST uplifting, in a different way. =20   Ten years later, just out of college, I heard that sound again, often, from Richard Purvis at Grace Cathedral, San Francisco. Rarely if ever elsewhere= , except on much smaller instruments in much smaller venues, where there were only attempts to imitate it. Maybe at St. John the Divine in the 60s=8Bbut b= y then it had become =B3what I expected=B2 in an Anglican cathedral, so it grabbe= d my attention less.=20   C=B9mon, somebody. Translate my ignorance then (and now) into the right language, if you can!   My thanks to whoever can do it!   Alan   On 1/6/05 3:38 PM, "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:   >> But I was in such AWE of what I now suppose to have been oceans of strin= g >> chorus. =A0A sound I've ever since associated with "proper" Anglican music= =97 >=20 > You've got me curious, now. Yes, genuinely, because I've never even remot= ely > associated "oceans of string chorus" with anything even vaguely Anglican.= I > don't believe there is in anything in the Church of England, New Zealand, > South African, Scottish, Irish or Australian Anglican traditions that cal= ls > for any string chorus whatever. With that, only rarely are even a pair of > strings called for. String Celestes (be they Salicionals, Gambas or > whatever) are really bad news for accompanying voices, and the Anglican > tradition is about accompanying voices, be it choir or congregation. >=20 > As for choruses of strings, there are none in New Zealand at all, in any = of > our eight cathedrals, and I can think of only a very tiny handful in the > entire UK. >=20 > So, please enlighten me how your feelings came to be what you have stated= , > in the USA.=20 >=20 > Ross >=20    
(back) Subject: RE: Jazz theory for the church organist From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 09:47:05 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   Well of course George Malcolm played the best "Bach goes to town". He was, after all, permanently pixolated AND syncopated.....as "high as fiddler's fist", as "tight as a boiled owl",...."spitz poodled", in fact, but miraculously never "tangle footed!"   However, Ross points out the error of my ways, and I shall NEVER perform this fine work again with added inegality, subtractive inegality, or any other sort of inegality. In fact, I shall drop it from my repertoire list completely!   Pass me another pastiche, and I'll have another pint of that "Scuttered Nun" with which to wash it down.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       --- TheShieling <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote:     > > We might, perhaps unkindly, suggest that Templeton > wrote what he intended > and that to be "stylistically correct" his > intentions need to be followed. I > know of no post-WWII composer who would expect the > player to alter his > timings dramatically.   > I still reckon the best performance of "Bach Goes to > Town" is the > harpsichord performance of George Malcolm.       __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - now with 250MB free storage. Learn more. http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250  
(back) Subject: Seattle Cathedral - was String Chorus From: "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 12:19:33 -0600   String chorus???Alan, the organ you heard at St. Mark's in Seattle was a = 1902 3/33 tubular-pneumatic Kimball which had been moved from the = previous building in 1931 This was replaced in 1965 by the Flentrop.   Sand. =20  
(back) Subject: Re: 1801 George Pike England Organ, St. Margaret's Lothbury, London From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 10:16:22 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   The George Pike England organ of St.Margaret's, Lothbury, London, has been rebuilt/enlarged several times.   In spite of this, the tonal traces of the original England organ can still be heard. The stops marked with an asterisk are those found in the original instrument of 1801.   The original specification was as follows:-   Great   Open Diapason 8 Stopped Diapason 8 Principal 4 Twelfth 2.2/3 Fifteenth 2 Sesquialtera (Bass) 3rks ? Sesquialtera (Treble) Trumpet 8     Swell   Open Diapason 8 Stopped Diapason 8 Principal 4 Fifteenth 2 Trumpet 8 Hautbois 8   Choir   Stopped Diapason 8 Added ? Dulciana 8 Added? Principal 4 Added? Flute 4 Added? Cremona 8   Pedal (GG compass)   Unison bass 10.2/3 (open pipes)   I'm not quite sure what the Choir Organ "added" stops means, unless they were added by England at a later date.     Hope that makes sense.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK         --- Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote:   > ......St. Margaret's, Lothbury in London...... > This is reportedly that > same organ that Mendelssohn once played. > > Though it credits the organ as being 1801, and > "restored" in 1984 by John Budgen, on the > specification it asterisks stops containing pipes > from the 1801 organ. > > I don't understand exactly what this means   __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Renaissance Allen Digital Organ From: "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 18:22:16 -0000   Dear All,     If anyone has ever used the above mentioned Allen Digital Organ, then = could they tell me when they would ever use the Zimbel stop? It is a foot stop = and creates the most horrible Santa's Sleigh Bell noise.     I've always wanted to have a laugh with it and use it inplace of the altar boy's bell, but I presume that's not what it's for.     Could someone enlighten me?     Dominic    
(back) Subject: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 12:23:05 -0600   Hello, Ross, Randy, et al: > You've got me curious, now. Yes, genuinely, > because I've never even remotely > associated "oceans of string chorus" > with anything even vaguely Anglican. . . . I was recently introduced to a beautiful IV/102 organ that has seven different celestes in Keller, Texas. A fellow was exploring the organ for the first time, and set up to play all of them (among other stops) at the same time. The tonal result was exactly what Randy just described: "oceans of string chorus." If you can imagine eating your very most favorite dish of exquisite food, you couldn't ask for more. This organ would represent Virgil Fox's "Komm Susser tod" in very fine fashion. AND, no it was not in an Anglican church, but could easily be described as excellent for Southwestern American cultures in Texas and surrounding areas. Not all ensembles have to be for accompaniment of the human voice, especially in an organ this large. My friend Burton Patterson can tell you much more about it than I. This is a fine organ, and I am pleased that it is so abundant in tonal colors, for whatever occassion, whenever needed, desired, or commanded.   F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Renaissance Allen Digital Organ From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 13:46:04 +0000   On 1/6/05 6:22 PM, "Dominic Scullion" <dominicscullion@email.com> wrote:   > I=B9ve always wanted to have a laugh with it and use it inplace of the alta= r > boy=B9s bell, but I presume that=B9s not what it=B9s for. >=20 I don=B9t think it=B9s out of the question, unless it really sounds gross. (Though some Sanctus bells don=B9t sound very wonderful either, so it may be appropriate.) We have a decent Zymbelstern, and use it (toe stud reversible) as a Sanctus bell all the time.   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 13:53:46 +0000   On 1/6/05 6:23 PM, "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote:   > The tonal result was exactly what Randy just described: "oceans of = string > chorus."   If that troublesome phrase, perhaps thoroughly inept and rightly discredited, turns out to be legitimate after all, then I'm glad to have Randy credited with it. But if it turns out to be a real loser, I'll have to take the blame for it.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Fwd: 1940s CBS Radio music broadcasts From: "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 12:54:20 -0600   We received the following question at the Administration Address. If anyone can help him please respond to him at the address below since he is not on the list   David ***************************************************************************=   >Reply-To: "Peter Tietjen" <petertietjen@earthlink.net> >From: "Peter Tietjen" <petertietjen@earthlink.net> >To: <admin@pipechat.org> >Subject: 1940s CBS Radio music broadcasts >Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 13:34:23 -0500 > > >Hi: > Not entirely sure that I'm in the right place, but I wonder >whether you might be able to help me nonetheless. Many more years >ago than most people can remember, there was a brilliant organist in >New York named Andrew Tietjen. As I understand it, he was something >of a prodigy, having been named assistant organist at St. Thomas >Church on Fifth Avenue at age 15, but playing recitals even before >that age. > In 1942, having auditioned eight or nine organists for a >possible nationwide ("coast-to-coast" was the term, I believe) >program of organ music, CBS launched the program in the spring, with >Tietjen as the organist. But the U.S. Army drafted him and CBS >planned to scuttle the program until a wealthy New England patroness >of the arts, Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, assured CBS Radio's Music >director, James Fassett, that she would underwrite all costs of >continuing the broadcasts if CBS would agree to have Edward Biggs >become the organist for the program and that the broadcasts >originate in Boston. CBS agreed, and the program continued. > Still, I wonder what might have become of the tapes that were >routinely made of CBS music broadcasts. Any idea of where they might >be? You see, Andrew Tietjen was my dad, and I'd truly like to find >first-rate copies of those 1942 radio broadcasts. But I have >absolutely no idea of where to search. > Any suggestions?     -- **************************************** David Scribner Owner / Co-Administrator PipeChat   http://www.pipechat.org mailto:admin@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 13:55:29 +0000   On 1/6/05 6:23 PM, "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> wrote:   > This organ would represent Virgil Fox's "Komm Susser tod" in very fine > fashion. AND, no it was not in an Anglican church, but could easily be > described as excellent for Southwestern American cultures in Texas and > surrounding areas.   That's a good clue. Would Virgil Fox have played it on the Wanamaker?   Alan    
(back) Subject: Re: Seattle Cathedral - was String Chorus From: "Alan Freed" <acfreed0904@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 06 Jan 2005 14:05:38 +0000   On 1/6/05 6:19 PM, "Sand Lawn" <glawn@jam.rr.com> wrote:   > Alan, the organ you heard at St. Mark's in Seattle was a 1902 3/33 > tubular-pneumatic Kimball which had been moved from the previous building= in > 1931 This was replaced in 1965 by the Flentrop. >=20 THANK you, Sand. I would NEVER have guessed it was that early! Queen/Empress Victoria herself could have heard it! (And I=B9d never have guessed that it was a Kimball! Seattle had barely come into existence in 1902!)   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: 1940s CBS Radio music broadcasts From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 13:10:43 -0600   Hello, David, et al: You posted: * * * > * * * I wonder what might have become of the tapes > that were routinely made of CBS music broadcasts. Not in 1942. The "tape" recorder had not been invented yet. The best technology for recording audio at that time was "wire" recorders, and that was possibly mostly used in the Military operations. The broadcast industry was universally locked in the large disc recordings for distributing their "network" broadcasts into areas that were only poorly covered with "good" land lines.   In all probability, the broadcasts were either transmitted on the best telephone lines that could be provided or recorded on 16-inch disks. > Any idea of where they might be? That is a litigimate question, and you would have to ask some really "old timers" for the answer. Good luck on your search. If I were you, I would start with Bob Scarborough, aka "Desert Bob" on the Eorg-L list, also served by the administrators of this list..   F. Richard Burt Dorian Organs ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Randy Runyon's Aria From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 13:12:03 -0600   Hello, Allan:   > > This organ would represent Virgil Fox's "Komm Susser tod" in very fine > > fashion. AND, no it was not in an Anglican church, but could easily be > > described as excellent for Southwestern American cultures in Texas and > > surrounding areas. > > That's a good clue. Would Virgil Fox have played it on the Wanamaker?   I have the LP vinyl disc by Virgil Fox on the Wannamaker organ.   F. Richard Burt     ..      
(back) Subject: Re: 1801 George Pike England Organ, St. Margaret's Lothbury, London From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@swbell.net> Date: Thu, 6 Jan 2005 13:31:49 -0600   The organ as built in 1801 did not (according to Sperling's survey of = around 1850) originally have pedals. These were added by Walker in 1848. In the light of this, I find it hard to believe that the organ was ever played by Mendelssohn, since he always insisted on having a proper pedalboard of at least C-d1 27 notes, and I don't think it went up as far as this even = after Walker had added the pedals. The church website does, however, claim that Mendelssohn once played the organ, so (who knows?) perhaps he did. The organ was rebuilt by Bryceson in 1879, Jones in 1891, and finally by Hill, Norman & Beard in 1938, who electrified the action. By this time about = half of the original pipework was left. The organ was reconstructed (a better word, I think, than restored) by John Budgen (Bishop & Son) in 1983, at which time a new tracker action was provided and the stop list was = returned to something much closer to the original. Cleaning and minor repairs were again carried out by John Budgen in 2002.   John Speller     ----- Original Message ----- From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Thursday, January 06, 2005 12:16 PM Subject: Re: 1801 George Pike England Organ, St. Margaret's Lothbury, = London     > Hello, > > The George Pike England organ of St.Margaret's, > Lothbury, London, has been rebuilt/enlarged several > times. > > In spite of this, the tonal traces of the original > England organ can still be heard. The stops marked > with an asterisk are those found in the original > instrument of 1801. > > The original specification was as follows:- > > Great > > Open Diapason 8 > Stopped Diapason 8 > Principal 4 > Twelfth 2.2/3 > Fifteenth 2 > Sesquialtera (Bass) 3rks ? > Sesquialtera (Treble) > Trumpet 8 > > > Swell > > Open Diapason 8 > Stopped Diapason 8 > Principal 4 > Fifteenth 2 > Trumpet 8 > Hautbois 8 > > Choir > > Stopped Diapason 8 Added ? > Dulciana 8 Added? > Principal 4 Added? > Flute 4 Added? > Cremona 8 > > Pedal (GG compass) > > Unison bass 10.2/3 (open pipes) > > I'm not quite sure what the Choir Organ "added" stops > means, unless they were added by England at a later > date. > > > Hope that makes sense. > > Regards, > > Colin Mitchell UK > > > > > --- Daniel Hancock <dhancock@brpae.com> wrote: > > > ......St. Margaret's, Lothbury in London...... > > This is reportedly that > > same organ that Mendelssohn once played. > > > > Though it credits the organ as being 1801, and > > "restored" in 1984 by John Budgen, on the > > specification it asterisks stops containing pipes > > from the 1801 organ. > > > > I don't understand exactly what this means