PipeChat Digest #5064 - Friday, January 7, 2005
 
Re: Putting an end to Evil
  by <Keys4bach@aol.com>
Re: "More Souls Have Been Saved..."
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Oceans of Strings
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
RE: Oceans of Strings
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca>
Re: Putting an end to Evil
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
Re: Audsley and pipes
  by "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk>
Re: Putting an end to Evil
  by "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu>
Re: Putting an end to Evil
  by "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com>
RE: Oceans of Strings
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
Re: Putting an end to Evil
  by "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net>
Re: Replacing Alleluias
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Putting an end to Evil
  by "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net>
PIPE ORGAN IN "GONE WITH THE WIND" ???
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Oceans of Strings
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
Re: Oceans of strings
  by "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au>
RE: Oceans of Strings
  by "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz>
String Organ v. Full Slush
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
Subject: RE: Jonathon's Remarks on Worship
  by "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com>
 

(back) Subject: Re: Putting an end to Evil From: <Keys4bach@aol.com> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 17:11:48 EST   In a message dated 1/7/2005 5:10:17 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, TubaMagna@aol.com writes:   To those who would use coupled strings in a worship service to try to destroy this great nation, I say: BRING 'EM ON!!!!       preach it brother........... have a good shabbat dale in florida  
(back) Subject: Re: "More Souls Have Been Saved..." From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 14:16:51 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I'm repeating myself, but it is often said that Handel's Messiah, has gained more converts than all the sermons of the world put together.   Actually, worship really counts for nothing, other than as an expression of shared faith. It certainly isn't Christianity!   Oh no! That's FAR more demanding and personal.   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK       __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: RE: Oceans of Strings From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 14:21:38 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I recall listening to a "Pipedreams" programme.   There was the American "Ocean of strings" and the organist playing the well known "Air on the G string" .....all wobbly and ethereal.   I LOVED IT, and I'm usually regarded as a Baroque enthusiast.   Absolutely no apologies!   Regards,   Colin Mitchell UK             __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone. http://mobile.yahoo.com/maildemo  
(back) Subject: RE: Oceans of Strings From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2005 17:33:45 -0500   Now that Colin has admitted to the fact that he likes the "All American Syrup", I suppose that puts an end to my comment that I have never heard so-called organ strings that sound even remotely like Norse hair being dragged over a cat's gut!   Each to his own, I fear!   Bob Conway     At 05:21 PM 1/7/2005, Colin wrote: >Hello, > >I recall listening to a "Pipedreams" programme. > >There was the American "Ocean of strings" and the >organist playing the well known "Air on the G string" >....all >wobbly and ethereal. > >I LOVED IT, and I'm usually regarded as a Baroque >enthusiast. > >Absolutely no apologies! > >Regards, > >Colin Mitchell UK > > > > > > > >__________________________________ >Do you Yahoo!? >Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Get it on your mobile phone. >http://mobile.yahoo.com/maildemo > >****************************************************************** >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> >List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> >List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org>      
(back) Subject: Re: Putting an end to Evil From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 17:36:01 -0500   Sebastian, You sounded like "W" just then. Kind of remeniscent of 'Ferris Buellers Day Off' "Ed, you sounded like Dirty Harry Just then. . . thanks, Grace"   Cheers,   Nicholas F. Russotto     On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 17:11:48 EST, Keys4bach@aol.com <Keys4bach@aol.com> = wrote: > In a message dated 1/7/2005 5:10:17 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, > TubaMagna@aol.com writes: > To those who would use coupled strings in a worship service > to try to destroy this great nation, I say: BRING 'EM ON!!!! > preach it brother........... > > have a good shabbat > > dale in florida     -- Organist, Early Instrument Enthusiast  
(back) Subject: Re: Audsley and pipes From: "Colin Mitchell" <cmys13085@yahoo.co.uk> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 14:49:39 -0800 (PST)   Hello,   I'm your man for this one Nathan.   Only 20....nay....16 miles away from me, are the famous cylindrical flutes of the equally famous Schulze organ of St.Bart's, Armley, Leeds, here in the UK.   Unfortunately, I can't find any photographs of them, but the web site of the church has some rather good images and information.   http://www.armley-schulze.freeserve.co.uk/   Oh yes! Those flutes sound absolutely exquisite.   Regards   --- Nathan Smith <erzahler@sbcglobal.net> wrote:   > Hi list... > > As you all know, Audsley gives a page or two in > The Art of Organ Building > to wooden, cylindrical, orchestral flutes. I would > like to know if any of > these still exist, and if anyone has played or heard > them     __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? The all-new My Yahoo! - What will yours do? http://my.yahoo.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Putting an end to Evil From: "Randolph Runyon" <runyonr@muohio.edu> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 18:00:48 -0500     On Jan 7, 2005, at 5:09 PM, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote:   > Coupled strings are merely another step in the moral > disintegration of > the human race, and we must be resolute in our resolve to be resolved > to bring > coupled strings to justice....   Right on! I propose we introduce a constitutional amendment, to be called "The Sanctity of the Organ Act," that would outlaw such unnatural couplings.   Randy Runyon Zion Lutheran Church Hamilton, Ohio runyonr@muohio.eduj    
(back) Subject: Re: Putting an end to Evil From: "N. Russotto" <ravenrockdesigns@gmail.com> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 18:04:45 -0500   Donate some $$ to Halliburton. . . that should guarantee such a bill being passed!   Cheers,   Nicholas F. Russotto         On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 18:00:48 -0500, Randolph Runyon <runyonr@muohio.edu> = wrote: > > On Jan 7, 2005, at 5:09 PM, TubaMagna@aol.com wrote: > > > Coupled strings are merely another step in the moral > > disintegration of > > the human race, and we must be resolute in our resolve to be resolved > > to bring > > coupled strings to justice.... > > Right on! I propose we introduce a constitutional amendment, to be > called "The Sanctity of the Organ Act," that would outlaw such > unnatural couplings. > > Randy Runyon > Zion Lutheran Church > Hamilton, Ohio > runyonr@muohio.eduj > > > ****************************************************************** > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > List-Subscribe: <mailto:pipechat-on@pipechat.org> > List-Digest: <mailto:pipechat-digest@pipechat.org> > List-Unsubscribe: <mailto:pipechat-off@pipechat.org> > >     -- Organist, Early Instrument Enthusiast  
(back) Subject: RE: Oceans of Strings From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 8 Jan 2005 12:17:48 +1300   >I do not disagree entirely, but i think a little slush here and there is quite nice.   I guess I'm speaking: no, I actually am speaking, from a NZ context, as = you are speaking from yours. I'm sure your country, though, is not too = different from NZ in that most churches wouldn't have an adequate organ of any kind, and only a few would be big enough and wealthy enough to have an organ = that could afford slush as well as a couple of choruses of principals, a few flutes, and a couple of reeds. Here, getting any interest at all in the organ, of any kind, is an up-hill battle these days. Where 45 years ago we young ones (as we were then) used to argue about tracker vs electric = action, and straight vs extension, and the merits of stopped vs open flutes, these days it's darned near impossible to raise a reaction for any kind of organ whatever. It's becoming the survival of any kind of organ that is the = major battle. Where, 45 years ago, there used to be a queue of people wanting = any kind of organ job (you know, 2 services a Sunday, 49 Sundays a year, for just an annual total stipend of $300), these days it's almost impossible = to find anyone to apply for any but the most senior of posts.   >The congregation seems to like it. I think that should count for something.   I wonder how much it's a matter of "I like what I'm used to" rather than anything else, here as in your organ culture?   >I probably agree with you more than it appears to either of us... its really your blanket statements I'm having trouble = with.   I understand this, but we are speaking from different cultural viewpoints: NZ is not a clone of the USA and never has been, and you are not a clone = of NZ culture. And that's one of the few facts in this wonderful discussion we're having. >> I believe the clergy do, to be brutally honest. At least in the = Anglican >> church, the Vicar is responsible for all that happens within the >> church, and that includes the music.   >As far as in the church, I absolutely agree. However, I'm not certain = that   >all clergy in all denominations necessarily would share your views.   Oh, absolutely. And even in an Anglican Church like ours here in NZ, the clergy are idiots if they don't have a worship and/or liturgical committee and work in with them.   >I apologize.   Thanks for that. I'm not really offended, as it's extremely difficult to have a serious discussion cross-culturally with a group through emails. We need, really, to be face to face and get to know each other as people. If only we could. Sigh. I'd really love to visit the USA organ and church = music scene and visit and hear your churches and organs, including everything you'd want to fling at me! I value enormously highly the time I've spent = in the San Francisco area and could in two minutes devise a list of 150 = organs across your country I'd love to hear and buildings I'd love to see. And = I'd come a.s.a.p., too, if I had the money......Sigh.   Ross        
(back) Subject: Re: Putting an end to Evil From: "F. Richard Burt" <effarbee@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 17:16:16 -0600   Hello, PipeChatters: I think Seb just said something in "politico speak." This probably justifies a detailed textual analysis to determine its derivition, coloquial similitudes, and potential predident for future considerations when we may need to pull the "wool" over the eyes of future unsuspecting neophites. NBC is portending such behavioral trends and traits on Wednesday evenings, and they call it "West Wing." Pucinni may have pre-emptied the whole politico speak situation by havingGianni Schicci inquire of Buosso Donatti's family, "What can such things be portending? Of course, most of us would not catch the import of the question for he was singing in Italian, and the audience is down-home coutryfied west Texas people. I'm sleepy. Going to take a nap. Ya All Enjoy, F. Richard Burt ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Replacing Alleluias From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 18:36:02 EST   In a message dated 1/4/2005 11:57:35 PM Eastern Standard Time, azeilenga@theatreorgans.com writes: I want to know what everyone would think if I took the hymn Creator Spirit by Whose Aid (tune LASST UNS ERFREUEN) and took out the Alleluias and replaced them with "Praise to You, Lord". I'm so confused. Is it just Hebrew (and its derivitives "Alleluia") that we're not supposed to sing in Lent? Translating the Hebrew into English = is OK? Seems to me that a "lenten discipline" ought to have more substance than avoiding a certain language, but I'm willing to be further educated.     Steven Skinner Minister of Music First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Putting an end to Evil From: "Keith Zimmerman" <kwzimmerman@alltel.net> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 18:43:40 -0500   Seb,   Did you forget to take your Lithium or Haldol this morning?   Dr. Keith   Subject: Putting an end to Evil From: <TubaMagna@aol.com> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 17:09:43 EST   Coupled strings are merely another step in the moral disintegration of the human race, and we must be resolute in our resolve to be resolved to bring coupled strings to justice. Coupled strings hate us because we love = freedom, and we must be resolved and resolute in our resolution to bring the evil-doing coupled strings to justice. Until the evil that is coupled strings is brought to justice, people will continue to couple strings all over the world, but it is better that we fight coupled strings on foreign soil, lest people continue to couple strings in our "Heimat." Those who couple strings hate our freedom, and they hate us because we want to bring liberty to the neoclassical clarified plenum by bringing the evil that is coupled strings to justice. We will smoke out the string couplers like the ferrets they are, and bring them to justice, and we must be strong and resolute in our pursuit of the liberty of the = true organ in worship. To those who would use coupled strings in a worship service to try to destroy this great nation, I say: BRING 'EM ON!!!!    
(back) Subject: PIPE ORGAN IN "GONE WITH THE WIND" ??? From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 7 Jan 2005 18:55:31 EST   Hello y'all   I received as one of my Christmas gifts "Gone With the Wind" on DVD. It = is a 4 disc set with many extras, including a beautifully restored picture, = color and sound. Now, the pipe organ I refer to is not the one seen at the left = of the chancel in the church-turned-hospital during the Atlanta scenes. That = one does look like an "instrument" built by the Selznick organization's prop department.   At the end of disc one, where the Intermission music is, I walked to the kitchen for a glass of ice water and stopped dead in my tracks when I = heard very mild foundation-like tones and tremulants. Upon closer listening I = discovered that there were other such stops that had been added (tibias, strings, = mild reeds and diapasons) and that they were indeed tremulated; their beats and = depth regulation were too even and precise to be human orchestral players.   So, if I am not mistaken, might this be the MGM Wurlitzer organ (given Selznick's merge with MGM for the picture's release), or did RKO Radio = have a studio organ as well? I know that MGM had a Wurlitzer on one of the sound = stages.   Anyway, something very interesting to research and learn about. OK folks, =   dig in!   -Scott   P.S. - this 4 disc set would make an excellent addition to any DVD collection.   Scott F. Foppiano Memphis, TN (scottfop@aol.com) Cantantibus organis Caecilia Domino decantabat.  
(back) Subject: Re: Oceans of Strings From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sat, 8 Jan 2005 08:40:00 +0800   Have I got it wrong or have some of the posters who have been targetting Ross mistaken the drift of his complaint.? I also understood Ross to have been referring to New Zealand and not the UK with his remark on the rarity =   of Voxes and strings in church organs.   I understood Ross's complaint to be about the use of an outlandish combination suggested by one poster as being appropriate for a church service, and not against the use of Vox Celestes and Vox humanas as such = in church music. If this is what Ross was on about I whole heatedly agree = with him.   There is not all that much difference between a Vox Humana and a Krummhorn =   or for that matter a Regal, all of which have been used for centuries in organ music. But to mix Vox Humanas up with several Celestes, and strings =   with 16, 8, and 4' couplers, and putting the tremulant on the whole sounds =   to me to be ridiculous and I would agree with Ross.. However there are no =   organs in this state with the resources to try the combination out.   I read somewhere of someone describing the sound of the Vox Humana as the =   bleating of a ninety year old nanny goat (or something like that). There would be only 4 or 5 in the whole of Western Australia, two of those in theatre organs, and I have never heard them used in church services except =   on one organ where I used one myself when I was very young, but it was = used solo in a Chorale Prelude then and not in combination. I know that the = organ music of some of the French composers calls for a Vox Humana (e.g. Cesar Franck, and the much maligned Edouard Batiste). They have their uses. Personally I would choose another stop before I even considered a Vox = Humana but of course in the huge organs in the USA onemay be put in as a matter = of course. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Kenneth Potter" <swell_shades@yahoo.com> To: <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, January 07, 2005 10:25 PM Subject: Re: Oceans of Strings     > Well, Ross's comments about strings have certainly set off a firestorm! > I'm afraid I would not last two days in his church. I would get his > one warning on my first Sunday, and would soon be packing up for > happier times in celeste-land. In America, we love our strings and > voxes and all that stuff. Not a steady diet of them, but for adding > color and variety nothing is better. Wasn't it Virgil Fox (not one of > my heroes, but he did often get it right) who said something like: > "More souls have been saved with Celeste's and Vox Humana's than any > other stops." I think I've heard Fred Swann quote him on that. > > Ross claims that there are only a handful of strings in the UK, but I > don't think that statement is anywhere near true, unless you limit your > search to dreary little parish organs of the more limited variety. > Certainly I recall hearing celestes in most of the great cathedral > organs in the UK. snip Ken       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.6.9 - Release Date: 6/01/2005    
(back) Subject: Re: Oceans of strings From: "Bob Elms" <bobelms@westnet.com.au> Date: Sat, 8 Jan 2005 08:50:34 +0800   I don't think anyone was saying that organ srings are supposed to sound exactly like a bow being drawn across violin strings. The fact remains = that string pipes have what is universally called a "stringy" character just as =   organ flutes have a "flutey" character without sounding like an orchestral =   flute (even though some do imitate that instrument fairly well). There are four families of organ tone - principal (or diapason), string, flute and reed. That is a fact and there is no reference to orchestral in those names. The names merely indicate the family of sound in organ stops. Bob Elms.   ----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Conway" <conwayb@sympatico.ca> To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> Sent: Friday, January 07, 2005 11:31 PM Subject: Re: Oceans of strings     >I have said this before on these lists, - I never can hear a string sound =   >on a pipe organ! > In my view, a noise generated by a pipe being blown by wind pressure, > cannot ever be said to imitate a horse haired bow being dragged across a =   > gut string! There isn't even a similarity of any sort. > But then, I am not an organist, and can never kid myself that there is a =   > wonderful "string" section of any kind.       -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 265.6.9 - Release Date: 6/01/2005    
(back) Subject: RE: Oceans of Strings From: "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> Date: Sat, 8 Jan 2005 13:57:42 +1300   Bob,   Thanks for your posting.   >Have I got it wrong or have some of the posters who have been targetting Ross mistaken the drift of his complaint.? I also understood Ross to have been referring to New Zealand and not the UK with his remark on the rarity =   of Voxes and strings in church organs.   Aye. Strings are not rare here, as I've tried twice to say. Chorus = strings, though, are non-existent in NZ and almost non-existent in the UK.   >I understood Ross's complaint to be about the use of an outlandish combination suggested by one poster as being appropriate for a church service, and not against the use of Vox Celestes and Vox humanas as such = in church music. If this is what Ross was on about I whole heatedly agree = with him.   Yea, verily :-) I'm so pleased you "whole-heatedly" agree with me. That sounds so much more enthusiastic than just "whole-heartedly". May I = use this wonderful new word of yours? I'm all for new terms and words.   >to mix Vox Humanas up with several Celestes, and strings with 16, 8, and 4' couplers, and putting the tremulant on the whole sounds =   to me to be ridiculous and I would agree with Ross..   That's what I was saying.   >I know that the organ music of some of the French composers calls for a = Vox Humana (e.g. Cesar Franck, and the much maligned Edouard Batiste). They = have their uses.   I love the French classics: Couperin, du Mage, Guilain, Clerambault, Dandrieu, de Grigny etc., and it's impossible to play tbeir music without = a good Vox Humana / Voix Humaine. I love the sound of fractional reeds - that's why I admitted in another posting today to having two of them for = my home organ here. Especially, I love the guttural sound of a big-scale Vox Humana on an unenclosed chest. Too, an unenclosed Vox is a wonderful stop for combining with flutes and/or mutations for the cantus in so very many chorale preludes in Bach and the rest of the north European tradition.   >Personally I would choose another stop before I even considered a Vox Humana but of course in the huge organs in the USA onemay be put in as a matter = of course.   The reeds to have in an organ, for me, in order of importance, would be Trumpet, Clarinet/Cremona, Vox Humana, Oboe.   So, you see, I'm not anti-Vox at all, but just the slush/sentimentality mentioned here. As an Australian, Bob clearly understands what I've been trying to get across.   Ross        
(back) Subject: String Organ v. Full Slush From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2005 17:12:10 -0800   Sebastian Gluck wrote,   =3D-> There are a few instruments here in the United States that can very effectively suggest string tone, to the point of convincing imitation. The effect is NOT achieved with sub- and super-coupling. <-=3D     Right. I guess some distinction needs to be made between "massed string tone" and "Full Slush" for those who are comfortably unfamiliar with both.   Surely any of the good romantic builders in the earlier part of the century could, and did, build fine string stops. But a couple took that particular aspect of the art of organbuilding to its highest point, and I'd say two in particular were Austin and E.M.Skinner, with Kimball and Robert Morton running close behind.   Any large Austin would have plenty of strings and many of them also had floating String Organs which, as Sebastian rightly pointed out, would have their own sort of "principal chorus" -- massed sets of unison strings [even Contrabasses in some of them], then both sharp and flat celestes, sometimes even "Vibrato Strings" where the tuning was set pungently enough to suggest vibrato, then strings and (fewer) celestes at octave pitch, then a variety of "harmonically corroborating" upperwork mixtures such as Viol Mixtures, Dolce Cornets, etc., that usually contained 3rd-sounding and sometimes septieme-sounding ranks. Also, a good string organ would have several ranks of Quintadenas at unison pitch to add fundamental and body to the massed string tone. And a really comprehensive section would have unison registers at different dynamic and color levels including sub-choruses of muted string-tone.   What some may not realize is that this type of String Organ was put forth in its fullest form by G. Ashdown Audsley in his voluminous books that, had he been smart, he would have sold by weight! For all the unconventional and, in some ways amateurish ideals that he set forth, he really was pretty much conventionally minded and frequently railed against the "wooly mammoth" organs so in favor in his time. He spoke out for all divisions containing clear and full upperwork - the main difference between his ideas and more current thought was that he also espoused complete enclosure of organs, and in some cases dividing each division into two - with the foundation and unison stops in one box and then upperwork and mixtures in a 2nd box so that the intensity of the upperwork could be regulated independently.   And of course, indeed the utter pinnacle of this art is the 88-rank String Organ at Wanamakers -- which organ had its origins in one designed by Audsley and built by the Los Angeles Art Organ Company for the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair. That organ was then bought and greatly expanded upon by Rodman Wanamaker but still more or less following Audsley's ideals of tonal design.   Reading down the stop list of the Wanamaker String Organ gives no indication whatsoever of what really goes on in that division. People looking at the numerous duplications of 8-foot pitch without hearing it usually ask with great puzzlement, "WHY?" Folks, you just have to hear it to understand.   -------   THEN, "Full Slush" falls somewhere between the String Organ and "Full Wurlitzer Throbulation." It is more a tremulous and "romantic" sound than just orchestral strings as in a String Organ.   But what you have to understand is, you don't start out with EVERY string, flute, harp, couplers, voxes and 32s in the pedal. You start with a few and keep adding, or terrace the level so that you can play a solo line on one manual and accompaniment on another.   THIS "school" of registration was actually taken to its greatest height by Virgil Fox when he was at Riverside. Say what you will about his mannerisms and personal dress code, one area he did excel in FAR above the average organist was registration. He could start with an Echo Flute Celeste, build through the various strings, trems, couplers, harps, voxes, then start adding in mild chorus reeds, then more in the pedal, then stronger unison tone while simultaneously and gradually retiring the trems and celeste ranks and then slowly bringing on more mixtures and upperwork and big reeds until before you knew it he was at Full Organ. Then he'd go the other way - smoothly and seamlessly making his way back to that Flute Celeste wafting down from on high.   And THAT, really, is "Full Slush" in its full glory!   This IS a whole different art form than "High Anglican" and, yes, I can see how it would be totally foreign to someone unfamiliar with it. But as others have said, Please ... don't dismiss it out of hand just because it's not what "y'all do."   ~ C      
(back) Subject: Subject: RE: Jonathon's Remarks on Worship From: "Charlie Lester" <crl@137.com> Date: Fri, 07 Jan 2005 17:18:28 -0800   "TheShieling" <TheShieling@xtra.co.nz> wrote, [excerpted]   =3D-> Let me tell you the truth of the matter in this parish. As I've said before, we have three churches in the parish, two of them having 2m Allens and the other a 1m Ahlborn-Galanti. <-=3D     Well, "frankly my dears," I'd rather play Full Slush on the pipe organs in my two churches than to play High Shriek on an Allen or Galanti.......! But, then, "them's my druthers" --- I'd certainly not begrudge the fine folks in New Zealand the fare they are used to. I just couldn't imagine ... well, never mind.   ~ C